Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

Sail4beer

Usual suspect
10,388
3,688
Toms River,NJ
I don’t blame him for avoiding this dump. He doesn’t need the negativity that a few trolls heap on him when he shares anything he’s working on for clients. Top quality man!

 

TwoLegged

Super Anarchist
5,891
2,255
I don’t blame him for avoiding this dump. He doesn’t need the negativity that a few trolls heap on him when he shares anything he’s working on for clients. Top quality man!
Bob is a great guy, and I learnt a lot from his many generously helpful answers to questions I asked of him ...  as well, of course, as his many generous replies to others.

But in the last few years, something changed for Bob in how he approached SA.  He seemed to be pricklier, getting hurt when someone said "not my sort of boat", and seemed to almost seek out people who annoyed him rather than ignoring them or avoiding them.  He got very heavy in the discussion of the Morgans Cloud "Adventure 40" project, and let Brent Swain goad him into a fury.

However, we still have the amazing phenomenon that for over a decade, one of the great yacht designers shared a lot of his time, thoughts, and works-in-progress with this raucous, uncontrolled group of randoms.  That produced some amazing boats, and gave us insight into the development of several others.  I think we should be very grateful for that while it lasted, and not expect it to continue forever

 
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Bob Perry

Super Anarchist
31,943
1,338
I think Legs has it right.

I check SA and CA everyday. If I think I have something to add to the discussion I'll post it.

With over 6,600 fan club members on Facebook now that keeps me pretty busy in terms of playing on the internet. It has proven very productive. I have also been doing some virtual lectures to various clubs including the NYYC. That has been fun.

 

The Advocate

Super Anarchist
I think Legs has it right.

I check SA and CA everyday. If I think I have something to add to the discussion I'll post it.

With over 6,600 fan club members on Facebook now that keeps me pretty busy in terms of playing on the internet. It has proven very productive. I have also been doing some virtual lectures to various clubs including the NYYC. That has been fun.
Do you need another care package of vegimite yet? I know the last one I left on my last visit isn't near 13 year vintage yet, but you might be out.

 

pschwenn

New member
Wow! What do you call that mizzen-staysail-without-a-mizzen? Was she built?
On this 70' boat, the owner constrained the draft to less than 7', hence a longish keel was a possibility (a centerboard or wings could have provided better [at the least] upwind performance.)  A wing with long chord and little span has a center of effort well forward of that of a high aspect ratio wing.  The (heavy) keel cannot simply be moved aft to get the CE back to a usual position, so the CE of the rig with such a keel will be more forward than usual.  To not just the classic eye, this makes for quite an empty space behind the mast.

Nature refusing to move the CE back on the long shallow keel, what could be done to balance the look?

The pilot house, though low, does help to balance the look, but the owner still noted a visual imbalance.  Someone dropped in a Dodge Charger-like cigarette boat wing (yikes) which carries the radar and several antennae.  Still.  The mule helps to visually balance the boat, and provides a relatively low CE sail useful as a steadying sail motoring or no, possibly in lying to, in heavy air paired with a single foresail, off the wind in a broad range of windspeeds, and in light air with lots of sail area.

A magical sail apparently.  And attracting the curious eye.

 
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Bull City

A fine fellow
7,194
2,831
North Carolina
On this 70' boat, the owner constrained the draft to less than 7', hence a longish keel was a possibility (a centerboard or wings could have provided better [at the least] upwind performance.)  A wing with long chord and little span has a center of effort well forward of that of a high aspect ratio wing.  The (heavy) keel cannot simply be moved aft to get the CE back to a usual position, so the CE of the rig with such a keel will be more forward than usual.  To not just the classic eye, this makes for quite an empty space behind the mast.

Nature refusing to move the CE back on the long shallow keel, what could be done to balance the look?

The pilot house, though low, does help to balance the look, but the owner still noted a visual imbalance.  Someone dropped in a Dodge Charger-like cigarette boat wing (yikes) which carries the radar and several antennae.  Still.  The mule helps to visually balance the boat, and provides a relatively low CE sail useful as a steadying sail motoring or no, possibly in lying to, in heavy air paired with a single foresail, off the wind in a broad range of windspeeds, and in light air with lots of sail area.

A magical sail apparently.  And attracting the curious eye.
Linguistics?

 

pschwenn

New member
The connections are obscure but possibly real.

Language is based on innate human facilities (as song is for birds) whose nature is possibly not reducible to existing physics (as gravity, some phase changes, ... may not be). 

Same with aesthetics, invention and problem solving; all part of boat design and engineering.  So for example, the visual imbalance of the 70 footer's rig may be built in to us, a near innate aesthetic.  I don't refer to adherents of rigid expressible doctrines of what things must look like.

The human approach to resolving design and manipulation conflicts, a foundation of boat design, engineering and construction, may also be an innate (even limiting) human skill.  And the endless creation of novel (e.g. sailboats) devices and configurations another.

Also shared (for me): a scepticism about substituting computing for any of these skills, useful as they may be in some aspects.  E.g. a failure to learn to draw by hand has turned many current industrial designs into soulless copies of each other. 

_________________________________________________________________

Now you know what will out if I'm asked about the connection between evolution and boat design (hint: it has to do with the fallacy of progression to perfection.)

 
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Elegua

Generalissimo
I dunno, they seem ok…..

image.jpeg

 

Bob Perry

Super Anarchist
31,943
1,338
Advocate:

I'm doing fine with my stash of Vegemite. Thanks for asking.

Busy trying to teach my fan club members, some of them anyway, that frac rigs on cruising boats won't kill you. It's a nice break from trying to teach them that spade rudders won't kill you.

vegemite.jpg

 

olaf hart

Super Anarchist
Advocate:

I'm doing fine with my stash of Vegemite. Thanks for asking.

Busy trying to teach my fan club members, some of them anyway, that frac rigs on cruising boats won't kill you. It's a nice break from trying to teach them that spade rudders won't kill you.

View attachment 477719
We are in Southern Queensland preparing to sail to Hobart …

Went for a shakedown sail yesterday, everything worked apart from the main autopilot.

Hopefully thats fixed now. Weather up here is rubbish atm, La Nina giving us hot sticky stormy weather, waiting for northerlies.

 

kimbottles

Super Anarchist
8,055
784
PNW
We are in Southern Queensland preparing to sail to Hobart …

Went for a shakedown sail yesterday, everything worked apart from the main autopilot.

Hopefully thats fixed now. Weather up here is rubbish atm, La Nina giving us hot sticky stormy weather, waiting for northerlies.
Olaf failed to mention he is sailing the Bob Perry Designed Valiant 40 s/n 100 (first one ever built.)

In other words, his boat launched Bob Perry’s career as a yacht designer.

Pretty important boat!

Also means it is HIS BOAT that is in the Cruising Sailboat Hall of Fame.

 
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olaf hart

Super Anarchist
Doesn't look that famous at the moment Kim but that will change when she gets home.

She lived up to her lucky boat reputation again last night, we returned to the fix our autopilot and a massive unpredicted tropical storm came through in the night.

We would have been at sea or at anchor if we had pushed on ..

So waiting for the next window and keen to get out of here.

 

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