Pics That Get You...

Voiled

Member
437
312
1662134164739.png
 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
Don't recall when I found this, but liked it so much it's been my avatar for awhile now...

1662136563392.png


sail-world.com

18ft Skiffs: The day the winds blew on Sydney Harbour

On Sunday February 24, 2013 the Australian 18 Footers League hosted one of the most spectacular 18ft Skiff races ever staged on Sydney Harbour. The race was Race 7, which was the final race of…
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unShirley

Super Anarchist
1,702
282
Ventura
Don't recall when I found this, but liked it so much it's been my avatar for awhile now...

View attachment 538498

sail-world.com

18ft Skiffs: The day the winds blew on Sydney Harbour

On Sunday February 24, 2013 the Australian 18 Footers League hosted one of the most spectacular 18ft Skiff races ever staged on Sydney Harbour. The race was Race 7, which was the final race of…
More
.
I feel the same way about this one (except I do know where I found it):

IMG_0204.jpg
 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
6,757
1,126
San Diego

That's a "quadrilateral". Simple concept, hard to execute well. Get rid of the cloth required to go to a single point, it's just drag. And before high tech materials, impossible to construct. The leading 1/3 of a sail does all the work, the rest is drag. So the two clews allow the sail to have just the leading edge. Trimming the sail is a bit of work, but does have advantages: you can easily control the leach profile by changing the tension on the upper sheet.
 

nolatom

Super Anarchist
3,615
649
New Orleans
Okay, photo up above is more heart-freezing than heart-pumping, but a fun challenge Sunday afternoons at 25F, Frostbiting in Marblehead 1977(?). Forty-five boats on the line, five races. Lots of talent, and no one could outspend you in those Interclubs, just good even dinghy racing.
 
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Voiled

Member
437
312
What is going on with that headsail? Two clews?
Coincidentally Endeavour which I posted above your comment originally sported such a headsail. It even is visible in the uncropped version of the picture I posted but I can't find that one at the moment.


04505.jpg


Double-clewed jib

A headsail which was also known as a quadrilateral jib. It was introduced aboard the J-class Endeavour by her owner Mr (later Sir) Thomas Sopwith prior to the 1934 challenge for the America's Cup. It was really an extra-large jib with the clew cut off to form a four-sided sail sheeted with two sheets, with the new fourth side corresponding to the leech of a normal four-sided mainsail on a gaff rig. It was almost certainly the invention of John Nicholson, the son of yacht designer Charles E. Nicholson, who designed Endeavour and whose firm, Camper & Nicholsons, built her. It was believed by the British to be more efficient than the normal triangular jib. It was known to the Americans, who quickly adopted it, as a ‘Greta Garbo’, but it never caught on as a racing sail.
 




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