Pilothouse For Puget Sound, $40K Or Less

White Lightnin'

Super Anarchist
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Anacortes, Wa
Look for a North Sea 34. Built in Vancouver off a European design (Colvic Victor 34). They only built around 25 back in the late 70's/early 80's. 6'3 head room, true pilothouse, long cord fin keel, lightweight at 13,400. IOR sail plan with tiny main and big jib.

Here's mine with a recently added inner stay for making it a cutter rig.

231-3.jpg

 

Dave J

New member
That looks like a very nice one.  I thought I saw one for sale a while ago but was probably mistaken.  Since then I'd completely forgot about them.  We like to walk the docks at the Cap Sante marina so I'll keep any eye out for it next time we do some boat looking.  Does it sail pretty well?  Looks like it would.

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,750
5,719
Canada
Saildrive zincs- annually unless you have a hot marina.

Keep the leg painted with a good epoxy primer then copper free antifouling.

Change the rubber diaphragm - sometimes. Many of them are 15 years old and still going strong. You don't have to the pull an engine to change them, just the upper part of the drive where it bolts to the engine.

I'm not saying they are trouble free, but they aren't a deal breaker in most cases.

Good how to article here:

https://maxiowners.net/technical/engine/saildrive-gaiter-replacement/

 

sailak

Super Anarchist
2,872
47
AK
As an aside, Rawson 32 pilothouses are awfully popular in the PNW. I've only seen one, ever down here and it did look like a stout, comfy boat, but...slo-o-o-ow?


As a Rawson owner I won't praise their sailing characteristics as being great (better than a Gulf) but all of the boats in this thread are SLOW!  Some a little better than others but not by much.  No replacement for LWL.  Last summer I shadowed a Catalina 40 downwind over the course of a 12 mile run.  Back at the dock her owner was real proud of beating me by about 5 minutes... yeah, um I mean yeah your boat is so much faster than mine ;)   The Rawson does a pretty good job at keeping up with any of the bleach bottle fleet and will tick off 100-120 mile days without any special effort.  But overall most of the boats pictured in this thread will likely sail better in nearly all respects compared to  1959 Bill Garden design with concrete and iron for ballast, and a deck 1.5 inches thick.  If Gulfs and even Pacific Seacrafts are options I wouldn't rule out Rawsons.  Granted this was a newb created thread but for $40k or less there are a lot of $80k or more boats pictured... 

There is a Cooper at my dock owned by a very fastidious dude.  Looks like a nice boat.  Personally I have always like the Corbin 39 but those sell north of the OP preferred price.

 

Bob Perry

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but all of the boats in this thread are SLOW!
You see what you want to see.

Rawson 30's are a special kind of slow. I remember racing against them back in the early '60's.

 
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Dave J

New member
Thanks for the saildrive info and article, Zonker.

My brother had a Rawson 30 many years ago that we enjoyed sailing.  While it's a completely different boat than the 30, it seemed well made.

We'll see how the upcoming Cooper looks that we're going to check out.

 

sailak

Super Anarchist
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AK
You see what you want to see.

Rawson 30's are a special kind of slow. I remember racing against them back in the early '60's.
I wouldn't argue with that!  I wouldn't ever consider any sort of a bouy race as the tacking performance is pretty dismal, but improves significantly with the addition of diesel.   I didn't consider a  less than $40k pilot house thread would include racing, but hey why not?  In Seward the Island Packet crowd was talking about starting their own racing class...  pretty funny.

 

Bob Perry

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Sailak:

An IP racing class is not so stupid. Funny? yes. But you stand the best chance of learning how to get the most out of your boat wit the least effort if you race. I would encourage it. I've raced El Toro's and enjoyed it. I encourage everyone to enter some informal races. Quickest way to learn to sail.

We raced the FD 35 PH model and came second boat for boat in class. Now that was a hoot! I think Donn, the owner, would tell you he learned a lot about the boats capabilities that day.

 

White Lightnin'

Super Anarchist
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149
Anacortes, Wa
Our racing covers Wednesday night buoy races and Saturday distance races. We do it for the fun of it after 25 years of racing more competitive boats. I am slowly rigging the boat the way I want so that I can take a slow boat and go a bit faster. We sail to the layline and tack or gybe. I try and nail my starts cuz that's still fun to do, even in a slow boat. With roller furling and cutter rig we roll the #1 halfway up for the tacks and it goes through smoothly. We have ab Asym in a sock that is easily managed.

Lots of little tweaks still to do.

A pilothouse in the NW just makes sense for us. Plus I enjoy eating my dinner at anchor and watching the world go by.

WL

 

sailak

Super Anarchist
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AK
Trust me I have nothing against racing slow boats!!!  Certainly not stupid, or dumb, or anything like that... but the upwind leg is going to be.... well interesting!  If I was organizing it I would make sure it was reaching only, maybe a close reach, maybe a downwind finish.   If they get off the ground I would probably sign up.   Is there such a thing anywhere?   Getting the most from a boat/design is certainly one of the marks of a good sailor.  I sail around with tell tales affixed to my headsails and main, use outhaul, vang and change my genoa car positions for each tack, tune the rig.  Clean bottom is absolutely critical.   On a Rawson 30... yep. Keeping up with bleach bottles that do none of those things, generally not a problem.   Now what was stupid is when I tried to race my old O'Day 25 keel/center-boarder.  Got totally wiped out on the upwind leg.  All other points of sail were great but going up against Cals and Santanas with a vaguely foil shaped piece of iron or lead was a non-starter for that boat no matter how well it was sailed.  I had a decent set of sails for that boat too.  

 

Norse Horse

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The Rock
Looking forward to your review of the Cooper, Dave.

I saw these listed in your budget range.

This Calkins is really pretty, I thought. Has been kept up. https://vancouver.craigslist.ca/rch/bod/d/1982-calkins-pilothouse-sloop/6343379250.html

I never heard of this model before, the Newport 33PH. Gary Mull. It might only be a DS. Same builder as the Gulf 32 ? http://www.usedvictoria.com/classified-ad/33-Newport-pilothouse-sloop_30481536

http://www.thunderbirdmarine.com/boat-info.php?ID=3764

http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=3289

Gulf 32 http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=1265

 

Dave J

New member
Thanks for the links, Norse Horse.  While the Calkins is an interesting boat, I'm not ready for a wood boat.  My brother has a 30 ft Bolger cat yawl that was designed and built for him about 27 years ago.  It's been pretty reasonable for upkeep but I'd really like to minimize that kind of maintenance at the moment.

I'd forgotten about the Newport 33 pilothouse.  With a raised saloon, it looks airy.  I do like Gary Mull designs.  Possibly an autopilot remote could work from the cabin.  I saw an ad for the 39 foot version of this boat for sale a year or two ago in California.  I think it started out at $110K and was working it's way down past $80K by the time I stopped tracking it.  Not too many were made from what I understand.  I'll have to do some research on the 33.

I've always liked the look of the Gulf 32 but hear varying reports on its sailing abilities.  I talked to an owner about 10 yrs ago that sold his Westsail 42 to a young couple in Alaska provided he'd accompany them on their trip with the boat back to Alaska.  His replacement boat was a Gulf 32.  He said on one stretch, they got into the roughest water he's seen and the Gulf seemed to handle it much better than the Westsail.  I guess that doesn't mean it sails well, though, since they were probably motoring.  Other articles have indicated how when rough, it can punch through the chop sailing where lighter boats slow down.  I guess that doesn't help with the light winds around here, though.

I looked at the Cooper 353 yesterday.  I didn't particularly care for it.  Probably more a case of this particular one.  It seemed too dark inside due to the dark woods, dark fabrics and small ports down below. I had the same feeling when going on an older Gulf 32 pilothouse a month ago. I wonder about spending time down there with our typical gray winter weather.  The lower edge of the forward facing windows were pretty high.  I don't think I'd be able to see anything low in front of the boat for maybe a mile out.  Cracks on the plexiglass side windows.  It also seemed to have a lot of freeboard and with my wife's knees, we broke out a ladder for her.   I wonder about docking in a crosswind with the freeboard and pilothouse height plus just the aesthetics.  It does make for a reasonably large interior.  I liked a raised cockpit platform behind the wheel to allow seeing over the pilothouse.  Unfortunately, the cockpit canvas was too low so I couldn't stand up without hitting my head.  I won't cross it off my list just yet, though.

 




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