Pilothouse For Puget Sound, $40K Or Less

Dave J

New member
I read something about Lyle Hess, when much younger, being anchored out on a very small boat as a large yacht slowly came by.  He overheard a man, dressed in a suit , looking down at the small boat say something to the effect that he'd rather be on that little boat than on the yacht.  A pocket cruiser could be a fun thing to explore shallow water around the sound.

On a little larger scale, I've heard about Nautilus 36 pilothouse sailboats being built on a C&C 37 hull.   They look pretty nice and must sail well.  This one is for sale for $30K in Wisconsin.  There are more for sale.  Thoughts?

Nautilus 36.jpg

Nautilus 36 Underbody.jpg

 

blackjenner

Super Anarchist
Dave:

No, not sure where it is. I do remember the boat. A taiwanese owner just bought TOUCAN, a local boat, and sailed it back to Taiwan. He has nothing but praise for the boat after a demanding, heavy air passage. They are fabulous boats,,,,until you want to back up. Bow thruster recommended.  The PH version is one of my best designs. Great layout.

There are PH Tayana 37's around. A PH Baba 35 would suit you just fine as would a Tashiba 36 PH but they are hard to find.

Brigadoon 2 by robert perry, on Flickr

Tricky Pig and I raced with Donn and Keri in the Race Your House race. We finished second boat for boat in our class, beating a lot of bigger more modern designs. We kicked ass.

Brigadoon race 1 by robert perry, on Flickr

Baba 40 ph by robert perry, on Flickr
You are welcome to see Brigadoon in Port Townsend this winter.

 

Dave J

New member
That would be great!   My wife was just saying we should look at some pilothouse boats and narrow them down.  The downside to looking at Brigadoon is that any boat after that probably wouldn't cut it.  But, I'll take the risk...  Thanks.

 

Dave J

New member
Reflex Sailor, do you mean any roller furling main or just this type external to the mast?  I suppose some area is lost due to no battens and the shape probably isn't the greatest.  The quickness and simplicity of roller furling is appealing, though.

 

Ishmael

52,413
12,233
Fuctifino
Reflex Sailor, do you mean any roller furling main or just this type external to the mast?  I suppose some area is lost due to no battens and the shape probably isn't the greatest.  The quickness and simplicity of roller furling is appealing, though.
Hideous flow behind the mast with those things, they look like speed disruptors.

 

Reflex Sailor

Member
248
5
UK
If I had to have vertical furling main, I'd only ever go in mast, not an external furler.  But I'd get rid that as soon as I could in favour of stackpack, lazy jacks and full battens (different thread).

 

Dave J

New member
That does sound like a good way to go.  Even though most pilothouses are cruising boats, it still fun to get the most performance you can.

 

Dave J

New member
I've been keeping an eye on that Islander Freeport.  It has a lot of features we like including the roller furling and heat.  Not low engine hours 2900 something but probably would last us for quite a while. Thanks.

 

steele

Super Anarchist
1,731
229
Land of the locks
The islander looks a little rough so you might get it for less than 28k. I would want to know why all the port frames are painted blue, it would be a big job to replace them if they are going bad.

As an aside you can go to the Perry Rendezvous with a non Perry boat. We did this year and had fun despite our second class status. 

 

Dave J

New member
I wondered about the blue frames, too.  Where do you usually hear about the time and place for the Perry rendezvous?  I sometimes run across a notice in 48 North but it's hit or miss for me.  I bet I'd hear about it on this forum now that I think about it.

 

steele

Super Anarchist
1,731
229
Land of the locks
The Rendezvous was pretty low key but does get mentioned here and on the Perry website,

It seems like you are checking CL often, but in case you missed it, https://seattle.craigslist.org/kit/boa/d/pilot-house-sailboat-with/6351061084.html. The motor is brand new and the saildrive looks to be only 4 years old. With instal it probably cost more than 1/2 the asking price. I have the same motor in my boat, it might be a little underpowered but a sea trial would sort that out.

 

Dave J

New member
Thanks Steele.  I appreciate the link.   That's the one I looked at a week and a half ago.  It looks better in the pics.   I think it had some pluses and the engine was definitely one of them.  It seemed to have very high freeboard and pilothouse along with being pretty hard to see forward through the front windows  Side windows were plexiglass with a lot of cracks around the edges.  It was fairly dark inside and still looked like it needed some attention.  I couldn't stand up at the cockpit wheel without the cockpit cover resting on my head.  I think the sails were a little rough from what the owner said.  We weren't on it too long.  I wonder about docking in a crosswind and being blown around due to the height.  My wife didn't care for it that much plus I don't think could have seen forward from inside.  Most of the minor issues could be addressed but at the moment, we thought we should see if another suits us better.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Dave J

New member
I was looking at an ad for a mid 70's racer/cruiser that I've always liked and still do.  When I got to this picture of foul weather gear in a wet cockpit, it sure drove home the appeal of inside steering.  I'm sure I'll still use my foul weather gear if I get a boat with inside steering but it will be comforting to know "inside" is there if I want it.

  Wet Cockpit.jpg

 

Ishmael

52,413
12,233
Fuctifino
That's not foul-weather gear, that's tailored heavy-duty garbage bags in pretty colours. I wore Peter Storm for years, I know unpleasant when I see it.

 

steele

Super Anarchist
1,731
229
Land of the locks
Sorry J I missed your earlier post on theCooper, your points are well taken. If you dont find a pilot house in your price and size range dont discount a good standard boat with a well made dodger and an underdeck autopilot and remote. Mine has a forced air heater with vents into the storage areas to dry out the wet gear, some sailors have even added a vent low in the cockpit forward to keep your feet warm. 

Ish, my wife and I once rode our bikes 120 miles in the rain with gear like you describe, we were too poor for gortex and even covered our heads in shower caps under our helmets and stuck our feet in plastic bags in our shoes. The smell after 9 hours would have gagged maggots.

 

JAndrews

New member
I live on an '81 Valiant 40PH ("Dorothy"), and have some experience sailing her. Here's a couple of my observations--but remember that you may have different priorities than I.

Our boat has a modified forward cabin--sleeps 2 in a pullman berth which sits to port. The only 3rd berth is the port side settee, as our starboard settee has been replaced with chairs and cabinets. So: sleeps 2... or 3. AMAZING amount of hanging locker space: 2 big hanging lockers and a huge accessible storage locker just forward/below the inside wheel. I love the galley layout, and it's convenient to the whole cabin, has lots of storage and access, and is just generally really functional. Our saloon only really seats 5 or 6. The cockpit is a blue-water (smaller) cockpit, and again, seats maybe 6. This is not a coastal cruiser for big parties in a raft-up: its a boat designed for sailing anywhere you want to go.

Dorothy sails really well. She's easy to balance and comes up to speed quickly. That said, even with brand new sails, she doesn't point AT ALL.  *Maybe* 45 degrees apparent. I haven't tried running inside sheets using the #2 jib--right now, our ability to point is limited by the spreaders and line angles. Summer air is very light, so we usually have a drifter (mostly retired now) or a 120% genoa mounted. Someone who really knows what they're doing might help me with that... but for now, we only sail directly up-wind if we don't care when we get there. That said: fall off to 50 degrees to the wind or further, she's well-mannered, easy to balance, fast, and responsive. Hydraulic steering--and you can still feel the rudder bite. Someone did a great job on that steering design. I sail wing-on-wing for anything like a broad reach down, and get good speed and easy handling that way. We don't have any way to mount or control the a downwind sail we have, so I've only used it Jerry-rigged (heh) on very light-air days. That's something I really want to get fixed... "someday".

We use the inside steering station All. The. Time.--both sailing and motoring. The best sailing here is when the weather is terrible, and it's great to be able to come in and dry off, get hot coffee, and sail in shirt sleeves. That said, the dorade box on the foredeck has to go--it's a real vision blocker. I'm going to replace it with flush solar-powered fans... "someday soon".

Someone epoxied Dorothy's bottom before we got her. We have blisters like measles top-sides; we think of them as "beauty marks". Nothing structural. Most people don't notice them. I do--mostly because I can't power-buff the boat. She has to be hand-waxed, or you end up buffing the tops off the blisters, which looks bad (the fiberglass layer is blue). Still--we got a great boat for a bargain price due to those blisters. We don't talk about them where Dorothy can hear--we don't want her to get self-conscious about them. The inside joinery is gorgeous and the wood still looks great, except the cabin floor, which we badly need to clean and re-oil.

 




Top