Pilothouse For Puget Sound, $40K Or Less

Bob Perry

Super Anarchist
31,942
1,333
JAmdrews:

Really? 45 degs apparent is the best you can do? That is very bad. A standard V-40 will do 32 degs apparent and there is no reason you should not do the same.

I had a 140% genoa on mine and sheeted it outside the cap shrouds and I had no trouble pointing.

 

White Lightnin'

Super Anarchist
5,154
149
Anacortes, Wa
Dorothy sails really well. She's easy to balance and comes up to speed quickly. That said, even with brand new sails, she doesn't point AT ALL.  *Maybe* 45 degrees apparent. I haven't tried running inside sheets using the #2 jib--right now, our ability to point is limited by the spreaders and line angles. Summer air is very light, so we usually have a drifter (mostly retired now) or a 120% genoa mounted. Someone who really knows what they're doing might help me with that... but for now, we only sail directly up-wind if we don't care when we get there. That said: fall off to 50 degrees to the wind or further, she's well-mannered, easy to balance, fast, and responsive.
If you have not done it yet, get the rig tuned. No idea of your sailing background, but check halyard tension for draft position and then genoa block for proper angle.  My pilothouse sailboat is sheeted outboard to the rail and in anything over about 7 kts of breeze can easily hold around 35-40 degrees. Under that and she struggles a bit.

WL

 

Albert_pnw

New member
2
0
cascadia
There's a really cool looking Skookum 34 built with a pilothouse that's been on the Oly Peninsula craigslist for a long time.

https://seattle.craigslist.org/kit/bod/d/34-ft-1981-skookum-34/6320646179.html

Personally, I think that looks like a great boat. I'm just not a full keel + wheel steering kind of guy.


To my eye that Skookum appears to be hogging at the chainplates. Not a good sign.


assuming this is the case, what is "hogging at the chainplates?"

 

Albert_pnw

New member
2
0
cascadia
The structure of the boat is getting soft, so the chainplates are pulling that part of the hull up and inwards. Usually this means that the ends droop. This is never a good sign.
Assuming the photos are the same as the original listing, how can one tell? 

https://seattle.craigslist.org/kit/bod/d/34-ft-1981-skookum-34/6463132734.html

Also, one user previously noted:

..."I don't see the hogging,  the sheer looks OK to me, but that IS just one picture and you have a better eye for that stuff than I do, Bob..."

thoughts? 

 

Alan H

Super Anarchist
3,360
777
SF Bay Area
I think you'd have to see the boat in person.  I'd probably hunker down on deck and sight down the toerail, looking for any significant irregularities.

 

Ishmael

52,623
12,377
Fuctifino
Assuming the photos are the same as the original listing, how can one tell? 

https://seattle.craigslist.org/kit/bod/d/34-ft-1981-skookum-34/6463132734.html

Also, one user previously noted:

..."I don't see the hogging,  the sheer looks OK to me, but that IS just one picture and you have a better eye for that stuff than I do, Bob..."

thoughts? 
It would take a lot of deterioration in the hull structure for a glass boat to hog significantly. I'd want to see what it does when it's hauled out. Or measure distance bow to stern, slack off rig and measure again.

 

Alan H

Super Anarchist
3,360
777
SF Bay Area
Skookum 34' are shall we say, not built lightly.  They're freaking tanks. In fact they're so ridiculously beefy that the sheer weight and mass would put me off. I'd prefer something more sprightly.

However, I live and sail down here on SF Bay and I only know Skookum by reputation.  Bob Perry lives, works and farts around in Skookums back yard, AND his business is boats.  I'm sure he knows the Skookum guys.   If Bob says he's suspicious about the sheer hogging, I would not take that lightly.

 

Alan H

Super Anarchist
3,360
777
SF Bay Area
Hey, it looks fine to ME, but I'm just some schmuck who'se seen the boat on Craigslist. 

Personally, that boat features prominently in my late-night-at-work fantasies of chucking it all and moving to Port Townsend.  However, honest truth is that while I'd probably like living on it for a year or two, sailing it might not quite be my cup of tea.  But that's just me.  Whatever makes folks happy...

 

Dave J

New member
It's been a few months of boat looking and trying to find something interesting out there.  If I up my price to $60K to $75K, any suggestions for a decent sailing pilothouse or something with inside steering for Puget Sound?  I've looked at a couple Coopers but they don't seem proportioned for us.  Freedoms look interesting.  We chartered a Panda 40 years ago but not a pilothouse.  That was a great boat.  We looked at an Islander 36 Freeport which is close other than the inside steering.  Size can be in the 33 to 40 range and low maintenance so doesn't need a lot of exterior wood.  It'll be mainly for the two of us (retired) with some guests from time to time.  We prefer something with a more open layout.  My wife would like something finished off nicely, cockpit with seats long enough to sleep on, an aft head and separate shower, quarter cabin and forward cabin, walk through transom or step for easier boarding, but that's all flexible.  I'm probably leaving out a bunch of info but this seems like a good starting point.  Thanks.

 

Dave J

New member
If inside steering is simply a no go, an enclosed cockpit or good dodger and cockpit cover on a typical sloop will probably be next.

 

Baldur

Super Anarchist
A bit bigger and maybe a bit more dough but one hell of a motor sailer, the Cheoy Lee 43 Long Range MS. Designed by my good friend bob perry. This one is in Europe and getting ready for a family circumnavigation. A bit too much crap on de back for me but I suppose it's practical if not beautiful. The lovely contours to the cabin trunk were crafted by my helper at the time Gary Grant. There is a lot of subtle complexity going on there. These boats will surprise you with their performance. Many years ago I went to the SFYC Stagg Cruise on a CL 43 MS. In the crew were designers Dave Pedrick and Frank MacClear. They were puzzled by how the boat could motor so fast. The only boat that passed us as we steamed up the Delta was a SC 50. I sent them the hull lines when I got home. It's a chunk of a boat with huge tanks. I think I started the design with the tank layout then wrapped a hull around it.

CL 43 MS at dock by robert perry, on Flickr

CL 43 MS 2 by robert perry, on Flickr
I am in love.  How have I never heard of this boat? Me want. Pant pant

 

Dave J

New member
Can't...hold...out....much ....longer.  Gasp!  Reaching...for...my....wallet. Double gasp!  Must...have....boat....now!!!

OK, that's pretty much what I'd like.  Now if we can just find an owner of one of these who is as desperate to sell as I am to buy...

 

Dave J

New member
How about a Nauticat 35 with a fin keel?

Profile.jpg

Pilothouse.jpg

 




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