Piper OD .. dayboat

Alan H

Super Anarchist
3,260
648
SF Bay Area
I cn't move the boat until he finished the DMV paperwork, which will be another 2-3 weeks so meanwhile I have the rudder at home. It's wood, and no biggie to make another one but the lower pintle is missing.

PiperRudderPost1.jpg

 

Alan H

Super Anarchist
3,260
648
SF Bay Area
The lower pintle on the rudder is missing.  I can either draw up specs...maybe even make a plastic template for a mold and get one cast...**cha-chinnngggggg** $$$$    or have a buddy machine a piece of  one inch bronze rod, then wrap a bronze strap about it, and drill the strap for screws. Braze the rod to the inside of the wrap of the piece of strap and voila!

Except will that hold up?  I know nothing about this sort of thing.  I'd think there needs to be a plastic or nylon bushing in there of some sort, but ???

PiperRudderPost2.jpg

 

SemiSalt

Super Anarchist
7,752
269
WLIS
My little  Chevy S-10 will pull this thing around the storage yard just fine, but I'm not using that little 4-cylinder to pull it on the highway. Besides, with my current setup, my towing limit on the truck is 800 pounds.  NOT.  So I was gonna rent a big U-Haul  8 cylinder pickup.  Those can tow 6K pounds.  It's a fairly steep downhill for about two miles out of this guys driveway to get to town, and then on the highway, it's three hours to the storage yard.  Thre's about a 3,000 foot elevation drop on the highway to that yard.    I'm not sure I want to do that without brakes on the trailer. 

There are some dual axle trailers for sale around the SF Bay area for about $500.  They're all powerboat trailers, but with another $200 worth of steel and some basic welding, I'd have something.  So that's tempting, too.


When a bought my Capri 22 used, I rented a U-haul to tow it from NJ back to CT. When I turned in the truck here in Stamford, the guy who moved it from where I parked it asked me if I'd had any trouble with the brakes. I said no, but I drove cautiously. He said he wouldn't let the truck back  out  on the street without major brake work.  

Long before  that, I sold a little 15 ft daysailor on a trailer. The buyer drove it around the corner and the axle broke. Very embarrassing for me.  We wrestled the little boat onto a different trailer that happened to be vacant so I could store it. He threw the pieces of the broken trailer in the back of his pickup and took them away. He came back with a new trailer in week or so. By the way, the broken trailer was galvanized....except for what wasn't.

Trailers are trouble. 

 

Sail4beer

Super Anarchist
9,809
3,266
Toms River,NJ
It is a parking brake cum surge brake.

Mode 1: parking. Pull lever and lock it.

Mode 2: normal driving.  Fully release lever, and flip out the pawl over the piston so it is free to move.  Now if the trailer starts pushing the car fwd (e.g. when car brakes are applied), the piston is pushed back and the trailer brakes itself.

Mode 3: reversing.  Fully release lever, and flip in the pawl over the piston, so that the piston cannot move.  Now you can reverse without trailer applying its own brakes.

I thought this was how trailer brakes were set up on all light trailers.  Heavy ones have a plug-in-link to the towing vehicle's hydraulics (e.g. on what you folks call a "semi" and we call an "articulated truck" or "artic") ... but AFAIK this is how all Yurp does it for trailers over the EU 750kg unbraked limit and below whatever the threshold is for fully-linked brakes.

How do Muricans brake light trailers?


39CE6EA8-CEB1-4857-B42D-7BB2BF2DB249.jpeg

 

sam_crocker

Super Anarchist
1,508
73
PNW
Fleetwood said:
Machine a UHMWPE thrust washer. 
When Night Runner lost her skeg between Panama and Acapulco, a new thrust washer was made from her plastic cutting board, which IIRC was polyethylene.  A hole saw did a good job getting it close.

 

bmiller

Super Anarchist
5,825
1,092
Buena Vista, Colorado
I'll have to fix that part of the trailer before I can move it..  Both the owner and someone who I haven't met yet, but we've corresponded about the boat think that I can grind out the bad stuff and then weld / sister some 4 inch side, 1/4 steel plate onto the good stuff and it'll be fine.  That will require a LOT less cutting and grinding than cutting out the whole beam.  This beam, on the opposite side has a bad spot as well, right where this destroyed part is, but it's not 1/10th as bad.
I surely hope you don't intend that to be a permanent solution. That piece of rectangular tube needs to be replaced. The bandaid solution might get you home but it ain't right in the long term. All the diagonal bracing will still be attached to swiss cheese. No telling how bad that tube is in the coupler either, at least from what I can see in the photo.

Put the boat on stands and give me the trailer. I'll fix it for the cost of material and a day sail. Wouldn't want all your hard work to wind up in a pile on the highway. 

 

Alan H

Super Anarchist
3,260
648
SF Bay Area
I surely hope you don't intend that to be a permanent solution. That piece of rectangular tube needs to be replaced. The bandaid solution might get you home but it ain't right in the long term. All the diagonal bracing will still be attached to swiss cheese. No telling how bad that tube is in the coupler either, at least from what I can see in the photo.

Put the boat on stands and give me the trailer. I'll fix it for the cost of material and a day sail. Wouldn't want all your hard work to wind up in a pile on the highway. 
If I was going to keep that trailer I'd cut out the entire beam and weld in a new one.  In fact, that was what I'd thought to do, anyway, but there will be a buttload of hacksawing to do, if I choose that option.  I may just grit my teeth and do it, even so, as it's a long way at highway speed from where the boat is now, to where it's gonna live.

In the long run, I will probably get a 22-23 foot long  dual-axle powerboat trailer. There are trailers like this available here for $500-$700 all the time. Then I buy some steel pipe and some  bracing,  do some welding and throw on four of these - https://www.scaffoldmart.com/boat-boat-stand-top-medium-23in.html and have a trailer that I understand for about  $1200. on

For now I just have to get the boat down the hill for < $400, as that's how much disposable moolah I've got available to me right now.

 
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Alan H

Super Anarchist
3,260
648
SF Bay Area
Word from the Class is that there is no source for the fitting that goes into the bottom of the rudder...the "pintle", though it's not really like any pintle I've seen before.  This will be a custom job.

 

bmiller

Super Anarchist
5,825
1,092
Buena Vista, Colorado
If I was going to keep that trailer I'd cut out the entire beam and weld in a new one.  In fact, that was what I'd thought to do, anyway, but there will be a buttload of hacksawing to do, if I choose that option.  I may just grit my teeth and do it, even so, as it's a long way at highway speed from where the boat is now, to where it's gonna live.

In the long run, I will probably get a 22-23 foot long  dual-axle powerboat trailer. There are trailers like this available here for $500-$700 all the time. Then I buy some steel pipe and some  bracing,  do some welding and throw on four of these - https://www.scaffoldmart.com/boat-boat-stand-top-medium-23in.html and have a trailer that I understand for about  $1200. on

For now I just have to get the boat down the hill for < $400, as that's how much disposable moolah I've got available to me right now.
There's no hacksawing involved, sawzall. Or a 7 inch with a cut off wheel.

Replacing that one tube is a couple hours work and 50 bucks in material.

Just my 2c but if that trailer is built to fit and can be saved, well......

 

Alan H

Super Anarchist
3,260
648
SF Bay Area
There's no hacksawing involved, sawzall. Or a 7 inch with a cut off wheel.

Replacing that one tube is a couple hours work and 50 bucks in material.

Just my 2c but if that trailer is built to fit and can be saved, well......
I've never used a sawzall-type reciprocating saw with a hacksaw blade.  If you were guessing, how long do you think it would take to cut through that 2 x 4 rectangular tube with a sawzall-type tool?

How about through an inch of weld bead?

 

bmiller

Super Anarchist
5,825
1,092
Buena Vista, Colorado
I've never used a sawzall-type reciprocating saw with a hacksaw blade.  If you were guessing, how long do you think it would take to cut through that 2 x 4 rectangular tube with a sawzall-type tool?

How about through an inch of weld bead?
Depending on wall thickness, less than a minute, assuming you purchase decent blades.

 
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bmiller

Super Anarchist
5,825
1,092
Buena Vista, Colorado
I've been using cut off wheels in a grinder more and more. My torch is gathering dust.

This video shows a shop doing a comparison cutting a heavy I beam and some square tube with a cutting torch and a grinder/wheel. 

Skip ahead to 11:20




 
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Alan H

Super Anarchist
3,260
648
SF Bay Area
bmiller --  Nice!

On the advice of many on the forum,  including you Mister bmiller... and AGAINST the suggestions of the prior  (technically still current) owner, I've bought:

8 1/2 feet of 2 x 4 rectangular steel tube

 few bits of  3/16ths flat stock

an angle grinder  and a reciprocating saw....and a couple of extra grinding disks and metal cutting blades.

The plan is to take an extra day off from work on Sept. 15th and drive up there. I'll block the trailer in place and cut out/grind out the rusted-out stuff.  I've contacted a mobile welding guy to  tack it all back together again. ALL the seriously corroded crap will be gone.

Then I rent a U-Haul pickup trick and bring it on down here.....

 
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