Plastic valves?

Capt. Andy

New member
11
8
I was looking at a 1982 30' Newport which I really liked however it had these valves. There's 5 I think. The owner said they've been working well for the past 40 yrs and he didn't seem concerned. I was concerned. And how about the corrosion? What could be doing that? It's either the intake or output for the head. Any ideas? Should I make an offer? What would be the ballpark for replacing with Marelon or bronze?

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Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,701
5,656
Canada
West marine retail pricing, guesses on sizes

3/4" (head intake, sink discharge x 2) $71 + $10 for hose tailpiece

1" (bilge pump?) $143 valve = $10 for hose tailpiece

1-1/2" (head discharge) $178 for valve, $12 for hose tailpiece

The green corrosion is totally normal for a bronze thru-hull of that age. Condensation due to cold water makes the fitting sweat. Unless you see metal being eaten away by corrosion, a wire brush would remove it.

 

billsreef

Anarchist
657
331
Miami
Scratch through that corrosion to bare metal. If it's bronze colored, green or even black it's ok. If it's got a pinkish color it dezincified and needs to be replaced.

 

Capt. Andy

New member
11
8
The green corrosion is totally normal for a bronze thru-hull of that age. Condensation due to cold water makes the fitting sweat. Unless you see metal being eaten away by corrosion, a wire brush would remove it.
Thanks for the reply. What about the black corrosion? I scratched it with my finger nail but couldn't remove any. Any ideas?

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,701
5,656
Canada
Normal. Fingernails are pretty soft. Probably if you pay for a survey (required if you want to get insurance, and marinas want to see that you are insured) you can get a better answer.

Plus taxes, plus new hose clamps, plus new hoses, plus...
You change hose clamps? I just flip 'em inside out...gets the kinks out of them, reduces fatigue

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
68,717
12,366
Great Wet North
Normal. Fingernails are pretty soft. Probably if you pay for a survey (required if you want to get insurance, and marinas want to see that you are insured) you can get a better answer.

You change hose clamps? I just flip 'em inside out...gets the kinks out of them, reduces fatigue
I don't like the bulge the inside out screw causes.

Plus the access for the wrench or screwdriver totally sucks.

 

10thTonner

Hazard to Navigation
1,636
599
South of Spandau
Sorry for the hijack but…

I am going to replace all through- hulls and valves on my boat this year. What’s the rap on these TrueDesign plastic parts? Are they better or worse than bronze?

(Boat was built 1990. Baltic salt water until 2002, then freshwater lake. Massive laminate under water.) 

 
I've had to replace one, the intake for the head. Handle broke off the post, introduced a very very small leak. Oddly enough, placing the handle back onto the seacock and zip tying it secure was enough to stop the leak. I checked it religiously until I was able to haul the boat out and replace it.

Since then, I've been lubricating the seacocks every fall and every spring, making sure I get both sides of the "ball" internal to the seacock. Means pulling the hoses off and any 90 degree adapters, but it's worth it.

Lube is important. *snicker*

 

andykane

Member
462
216
Victoria, BC
Was that broken handle on a Trudesign one, or one of the older marelon ones (Forespar, RC Marine)? The Trudesign ones seem to have a much beefier handle.

I've been very happy with the few Trudesign ones I've used to replace original 37yr old RC Marine marelon valves that have got hard to turn (which, to their credit, sat unused for 5 years). They're solid. Lightweight. No corrosion. Known quality and materials, unlike most bronze (or is it?) ones. Pricing seems very reasonable too. What's not to like?

I had a good lesson in the strength of these "plastic" fittings - I decided to replace a skin fitting while I did the valve because hey, it was nearly 40 years old and it would probably be a good idea, right? It took me a hacksaw, a crowbar, and a whole bunch of hammering to get the thing out and even with a full length saw kerf down the side it was still near indestructible. 

 




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