R2AK 2022

SeaGul

Super Anarchist
1,348
99
Oslo Norway
Different boat/different bows, but Borge Ousland reinforced his Corsair 31 bows with Kevlar before undertaking his incredible (and successful first ever) single season transit of the sea ice-strewn NW and NE Passages in 2010.

Fascinating stuff: https://www.fram.nl/North_Pole_Passage.pdf
Yes but they did it for the ice - not logs.... they had problems with rudders - the std plastic ones - but fixed them to finish...and it was no race...
 

SailingTips.Ca

Feigns Knowledge
771
322
Victoria, BC
And for what it's worth, we passed Campbell River on Team MAD Dog at 11h24 in 2016.

That’s totally amazing! It was pretty light for the first eight hours this year so I’m not sure that would have been possible on any boat.

Huge bummer. Is Dragon raced regularly? Or does she only come out of the barn for R2AK?

Drives me nuts seeing monohulls lead this thing. This should be a multihull race all day long. I think it's that the Farriers are basically cruising boats and aren't that fast. And boats like Dragon and Bad Kitty are older and have too many bits held together by duct tape and bailing wire at this point.

I can think of a list of multihulls that would crush 40' monohulls on an inshore or coastal race.

Lots have races have been cancelled due to the pandemic, but Dragon has been out for a few events, including Swiftsure a couple of weeks ago, which they won for the multis. LOTS of logs in the water then too. In Swiftsure we had to take major evasive action to steer around bow-crushing logs at least once an hour, and this doesn’t include the smaller stuff.

The Farriers definitely aren’t in the same category as Dragon or your M32 in terms of speed, but they meet their design brief very well. That said, isn’t EVERY boat a cruising boat compared to your boat?

And the boats around here are pretty old compared to your neck of the woods. Didn’t you know that this is where old boats come to die?!?!?
 

Airwick

Member
489
227
Victoria, BC
Definitely the most "lumber" I've ever seen.
I hit at least 5 "significant" ones (>6" in diameter and >10 ft long anything isn't worth mentioning) including the one that I believe caused the damage. It was about 2 to 3 ft in diameter and at least 20ft long. Bow went up a wave and came down on top of it.
I had just gone over a "medium" one ( ~6" x 10ft) that hit two hulls, the dagger board and the rudder 30s before. No chance of seeing them at all, only in the stern light glow.

Zoom in on that pictureand look at the background, these are all chunks of various size: that's what tidelines looked like.

I was throttling back too: had the traveller down and pinched up to stay below 7kt. It the biggest hit I was going less than 5 anyway...
Crewed teams could add a head light to try and avoid some of them at night (thought bout it but had to rely on the AP anyway to get some rest).

There's no easy fix for this!

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The Farriers definitely aren’t in the same category as Dragon or your M32 in terms of speed, but they meet their design brief very well. That said, isn’t EVERY boat a cruising boat compared to your boat?

Well I'm between boats at the moment and totally armchair quarterbacking this one. Just finished a condomaran charter through the southern section of the course today and saw a rediculous amount of logs in the water. Way more than we saw when I did the race. Everything was avoidable during the day with maneuvering. Probably helpful to be standing on the high bridge deck of a tubby charter cat. No way we could have avoided if we were running in the dark. It seems that this feature of the R2AK is Russian Roulette with half the chambers loaded. Knowing this, I would go outside. Not sure if this was obvious to competitors before the start. Are the debris conditions the same out of Port Townsend and through Puget Sound?

As for the Farriers, not knocking them. From the Farrier website, "The basic design philosophy has always been to provide safe, roomy, well engineered multihull cruisers with performance provided by design efficiency and good engineering, not at the expense of accommodation, structure, or safety."

Clearly they are popular and do something right, but they are cruisers. And yes, the M32 would pass like they're dead in the water. But, Mama Tried, the Open 8.5m tri, also consistently beats the Farriers, even the carbon ones.
 
Randy, it happened at 2am
That makes more sense. So sorry this happened to you guys! How did it go down? How fast were you going? Please share.

Can you think of any strategies to improve the odds in the future? Slow for 60 seconds at the first sign of floating debris? Headlamps seem like they would just kill the crew's night vision and only penetrate a few seconds up the track. Has anyone experimented with very high power masthead or spreader lights? I'm doubtful it would work but curious if anyone has tried it.

Other than stopping or just crawling along at night there's got to be some way through the minefield.

I know how much effort it is to get to the starting line and it's brutal to get taken out by a log. Terrible.
 

Strategery

Member
81
41
PNW
That makes more sense. So sorry this happened to you guys! How did it go down? How fast were you going? Please share.

Can you think of any strategies to improve the odds in the future? Slow for 60 seconds at the first sign of floating debris? Headlamps seem like they would just kill the crew's night vision and only penetrate a few seconds up the track. Has anyone experimented with very high power masthead or spreader lights? I'm doubtful it would work but curious if anyone has tried it.

Other than stopping or just crawling along at night there's got to be some way through the minefield.

I know how much effort it is to get to the starting line and it's brutal to get taken out by a log. Terrible.
Wonder how many logs they are seeing on the outside?
 

ProaSailor

dreaming my life away...
6,053
753
Oregon
Kootenay Peddalwheelers (FT10) have rudder damage and have pulled into Ucluelet to inspect. (from tracker and Facebook)
Team Kootenay Pedalwheelers (Flying Tiger 10m) is moving north again on the outside, one of only 13 boats on the tracker who have moved in the last hour. Along with their repair in Ucluelet, they got pizza:
“Some fans who having been following us since seeing out boat in Victoria happened to be in Ucluelet where we are doing repairs. They went and bought us pizza for dinner at Shipwreck Pizza!
Huge thanks!”
📸 @kootenay_pedalwheelers

Team Pure and Wild is 154 NM from Bella Bella. They are 48 NM ahead of second place Team Elsewhere (Soverell 33), who is also on the outside route.

Team Fashionably Late (Dash 34 monohull) is leading on the inside, approaching Campbell River,

All the leaders are monohulls this year. Better suited for sailing in a sea of logs?
 
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SeaGul

Super Anarchist
1,348
99
Oslo Norway
The log-problem is special to this race - stronger bows - maybe with som crash zone that can recower after an impakt. Rudders and daggers can be retractable. Slow down the pace at night can work - or avoid the problem by going outside. A catamaran like the Shockwave 37 or TRT1200 should be strong enough to take the impacts -they are also drier to sail and can carry more load/people but not as fast as Dragon SC30 or M32 .... but significant faster than the monos in the race and also faster than the Corsairs/Farriers involved.

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munt

Super Anarchist
1,127
146
The belt
I believe the Vendee boats now have some type of camera and/or sonar on the masthead to detect objects ahead. Probably ridiculously expensive but all new cars have collision avoidance systems so..? Obviously, this year is uniquely bad for logs.
 

ProaSailor

dreaming my life away...
6,053
753
Oregon
I believe the Vendee boats now have some type of camera and/or sonar on the masthead to detect objects ahead. Probably ridiculously expensive but all new cars have collision avoidance systems so..? Obviously, this year is uniquely bad for logs.
FLIR: https://www.flir.com/marine/recreational-boating/



Scion OTM (Outdoor Thermal Monocular): $3,149
 
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Strategery

Member
81
41
PNW
You know Jonathan gets solid weather routing. The overnight track showing them on the long starboard tack getting further offshore to avoid the dying breeze near land...all standard fare, but what winners do...priceless. Go PNW!
 

40Plus

Member
168
44
PNW
That makes more sense. So sorry this happened to you guys! How did it go down? How fast were you going? Please share.

Can you think of any strategies to improve the odds in the future? Slow for 60 seconds at the first sign of floating debris? Headlamps seem like they would just kill the crew's night vision and only penetrate a few seconds up the track. Has anyone experimented with very high power masthead or spreader lights? I'm doubtful it would work but curious if anyone has tried it.

Other than stopping or just crawling along at night there's got to be some way through the minefield.

I know how much effort it is to get to the starting line and it's brutal to get taken out by a log. Terrible.
Randy - We knew this was a possibility going inside, it was a roll of the dice for sure. With massive flooding on the mainland of BC and extreme tides things didn’t line up in our favour, so why did we go inside? The decision to go inside wasn’t easy as our preference was always to go outside, however the routing information we received had 25-35 knts for 10 - 12 hrs near Brooks Peninsula and for anyone that knows that area that isn’t where you want to be with a forecast like that so that was the deciding factor for us to go inside. Definitely the right call for Pure and Wild but not for us.

As for the log strike(s) themselves we were in 12-16 knts going upwind between 10-13 boat speed, it was lumpy and we were trying to be conservative at that point just in case we did hit something. Previous to the bow damage we had hit a log with the daggerboard so were being as vigilant as you could be at night with bumpy sea conditions. There was decent moonlight but realistically you still can’t pick out debris in the water when there are waves like that, as you mentioned a powerful light destroys your night vision.

With reports with even more logs in the water Johnstone Strait and further north we didn’t want keep bashing the boat up just to say we finished, been there done that. Disappointing for sure but comfortable with our decision.
 
Randy - We knew this was a possibility going inside, it was a roll of the dice for sure. With massive flooding on the mainland of BC and extreme tides things didn’t line up in our favour, so why did we go inside? The decision to go inside wasn’t easy as our preference was always to go outside, however the routing information we received had 25-35 knts for 10 - 12 hrs near Brooks Peninsula and for anyone that knows that area that isn’t where you want to be with a forecast like that so that was the deciding factor for us to go inside. Definitely the right call for Pure and Wild but not for us.

As for the log strike(s) themselves we were in 12-16 knts going upwind between 10-13 boat speed, it was lumpy and we were trying to be conservative at that point just in case we did hit something. Previous to the bow damage we had hit a log with the daggerboard so were being as vigilant as you could be at night with bumpy sea conditions. There was decent moonlight but realistically you still can’t pick out debris in the water when there are waves like that, as you mentioned a powerful light destroys your night vision.

With reports with even more logs in the water Johnstone Strait and further north we didn’t want keep bashing the boat up just to say we finished, been there done that. Disappointing for sure but comfortable with our decision.

Thank you for the report. Tough break.
 

alctel

Member
451
129
Victoria
From a comment on team pocket rockets insta

'Well. It was great to meet team pocket rocket. Sorry it wasn't under better circumstances for you guys. That being said it was a fun recovery to help you with. Glad we got you upright. For those wondering the boat ended up being compromised by the pedal propeller going through the port window as the boat went over. This filled the cabin and in turn the port pontoon. This made self rescue impossible. Hope the rest of the damage is easily fixed. All the best. James Mole. -Rescue Specialist- -Canadian Coast Guard-'
 
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