Ramming Speed! Tall Ship Docking Adventures

RobbieB

Super Anarchist
3,160
1,655
Charleston, SC
Dropping those anchors takes a bit of work and time, (typically there's only 1 primary that would have held it IF the water wasn't too deep for it to catch) and they'd need room for it to catch and the boat would have still swung with the breeze meaning the lady in pink was screwed no matter what she did, (great Jersey scream by the way, ugg! bet she doesn't even know where the ignition switch is...).  Having sailed on one of those boats I've experienced the mostly manual processes from back in the day that we all take for granted today. Nothing happens fast and/or requires less than 4 people to do.. There was no margin for error in that situation...

 

sailronin

Member
498
20
Seattle, Wa
Anybody ever hear of an anchor?  Promptly deployed when first lost control of engines might have helped mitigate the shenanigans...repeated 5 blasts of the ships whistle wouldn't have hurt either.  
That was my first thought but in the news article it stated that two anchors were deployed so I dropped the comment.  Not sure if that is correct but given the very close quarters it's unlikely that the anchors would have prevented impact.

I spent two terms (about 9 months) as Captain of the Californian, a 145 foot square topsail schooner back in the 1990's. We had a single engine and no bow thruster so I had to be VERY conservative in close quarters maneuvers. On the Californian I would have not have  left the dock in a 25 knot crosswind in such a tight fairway, actually it would have been unlikely she would have sprung off the dock in 25 knots on the beam.  We used to keep one anchor ready to run in harbor but even that would have been little use as it take more than a couple of boat lengths to grab and the video showed about one and a half boat lengths from "almost" ramming Intrepid to the stern impacting the motorsailer.

IMHO a bad decision to leave the dock cascaded into collision and probably a new Captain onboard.

 
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10thTonner

Hazard to Navigation
1,634
595
South of Spandau
I never got it why so many people like these movie prop motor boats with added decorative square rigs. Best they can do is being blown ddw bow first with the sails up. What they usually do is being blown ddw sideways with the sails down - as seen here... Square rigers my arrrse! (In the video it looked like at least the port prop was still running. Forward and reverse. Maybe somebody just underestimated his windage?)

 
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Somebody Else

a person of little consequence
7,638
805
PNW
I never got it why so many people like these movie prop motor boats with added decorative square rigs.
Same reason Rimas has FB fans/adorers/enablers--they don't have a clue about boats or the ocean but find the notion "romantic" and harkening to a time when things were "better."

Don't get me started on how lame playing pirates is! To be authentic, all you need is a cowboy bandana on your head, be shit-faced drunk, and say, "Arrrrgh!" until everyone wants to kill you.

 

Parma

Super Anarchist
2,992
398
here
Pretty good breeze out of the southwest pushing that steel hulled behemoth a pretty good rate - with that much windage I'm not certain they how quickly they could have turned even if they did have both props working. Boat never should've been in that part of the harbor.

As for the boats on the docks and why they didn't get out of the way, well, it's awful hard to get off the dock sideways straight into the breeze with boats fore & aft. Takes some time and careful progress. The lady on the powerboat could have backed out of there but by the time she realized what the heck was going on it was probably too late.

 

Somebody Else

a person of little consequence
7,638
805
PNW
The lady on the powerboat could have backed out of there but by the time she realized what the heck was going on it was probably too late.
Look at her and listen to her: it's always too late with her type. My guess is that she has a lawyer on retainer for whenever she decides to play the divorce card.

 

Crash

Super Anarchist
5,076
1,010
SoCal
That was my first thought but in the news article it stated that two anchors were deployed so I dropped the comment.  Not sure if that is correct but given the very close quarters it's unlikely that the anchors would have prevented impact.

I spent two terms (about 9 months) as Captain of the Californian, a 145 foot square topsail schooner back in the 1990's. We had a single engine and no bow thruster so I had to be VERY conservative in close quarters maneuvers. On the Californian I would have not have  left the dock in a 25 knot crosswind in such a tight fairway, actually it would have been unlikely she would have sprung off the dock in 25 knots on the beam.  We used to keep one anchor ready to run in harbor but even that would have been little use as it take more than a couple of boat lengths to grab and the video showed about one and a half boat lengths from "almost" ramming Intrepid to the stern impacting the motorsailer.

IMHO a bad decision to leave the dock cascaded into collision and probably a new Captain onboard.
Sailronin,

You are undoubtedly right,  and I didn't mean to imply that dropped anchors would have prevented any of the impacts...only that they might have helped mitigate them/lessen the severity of them. Without a tug/tow already hooked up, the anchor was the only hope, however slim.  I loved the directors comments that she didn't think the weather affected the incident...really?  

Concur with the likely need for a new Captain, this once certainly didn't seem to play through in his mind what he would do if he were to lose power at a critical moment...

 

monsoon

Super Anarchist
1,454
238
ELIS
Sailronin,

You are undoubtedly right,  and I didn't mean to imply that dropped anchors would have prevented any of the impacts...only that they might have helped mitigate them/lessen the severity of them. Without a tug/tow already hooked up, the anchor was the only hope, however slim.  I loved the directors comments that she didn't think the weather affected the incident...really?  

Concur with the likely need for a new Captain, this once certainly didn't seem to play through in his mind what he would do if he were to lose power at a critical moment...
Well sure the Captain is always responsible and all that, but what exactly should he have done?  Its tight quarters and windy.  Short of having a tug at hand I can't see what the Perry could have done on her own to avoid getting blown onto the dock and other boats.

 

Dex Sawash

Demi Anarchrist
2,571
798
NC USA
Why are people who film these things with their phones so silly.  Honestly it is not that hard.  

Get a grip on yourself camera person.  Either put down your phone and help, or at least spare the world your commentary and panic.  Drama major perhaps?
I will forgive the guy because he managed to hold his phone in landscape orientation.

 

JohnMB

Super Anarchist
2,837
609
Evanston
Well sure the Captain is always responsible and all that, but what exactly should he have done?  Its tight quarters and windy.  Short of having a tug at hand I can't see what the Perry could have done on her own to avoid getting blown onto the dock and other boats.
If its inevitable that leaving he dock will lead to a loss of control of the boat, the captain  responsibility is to  not to leave the dock.

If its not inevitable, then the captains responsibility is to  take the steps required to avoid loosing control.

We have all fucked up at some point, its best not to do it with something that big andheavy.

 
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Crash

Super Anarchist
5,076
1,010
SoCal
Well sure the Captain is always responsible and all that, but what exactly should he have done?  Its tight quarters and windy.  Short of having a tug at hand I can't see what the Perry could have done on her own to avoid getting blown onto the dock and other boats.
We have a saying in the aviation world that goes something along the lines of "exercising superior judgement so you don't need to exercise superior airmanship to save yourself.  Substitute seamanship for airmanship.  In this case (just a vessel re-positioning apparently from Seafood Fest to home pier) they should have either decided to wait for the wind to abate some, or decided to have a tug standby.  Its the old risk management analysis.  What could go wrong and what is the impact or consequence of it going wrong vs. what is to be gained by going forward with the plan/action.  

 

sailronin

Member
498
20
Seattle, Wa
Well sure the Captain is always responsible and all that, but what exactly should he have done?  Its tight quarters and windy.  Short of having a tug at hand I can't see what the Perry could have done on her own to avoid getting blown onto the dock and other boats.
See my comment above...basically he should not have left the dock in that much cross wind.  

 If you haven't sailed a traditionally rigged vessel it difficult to understand the amount of windage in rigging, yards, furled sails, etc.  We sailed the Californian (a square topsail schooner) from the Farallon Islands to the Golden Gate under bare poles and averaged better than 6.5 knots in 45-55 knots of wind. That's a lot of windage you don't deal with on a modern design.

 

snake

Member
111
0
Maybe im not smart, but looks to me as if the port stern dock line in neatly FLAKED OVER THE RAIL......& props are turning....

I think he just fuked up the maneuver.....

 

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