Ramming Speed! Tall Ship Docking Adventures

kent_island_sailor

Super Anarchist
27,191
5,119
Kent Island!
I found the RIB as bow thruster interesting. They really needed a bigger one, but the little guy did manage to get the bow around and then the ship just blew backwards into the dock.

I know someone who crewed on the Californian when they tried the same thing and the dinghy engine died at the wrong time, leaving them unable to make a tight turn without sideswipping a few boats :eek:

 

monsoon

Super Anarchist
1,454
238
ELIS
See my comment above...basically he should not have left the dock in that much cross wind.  

 If you haven't sailed a traditionally rigged vessel it difficult to understand the amount of windage in rigging, yards, furled sails, etc.  We sailed the Californian (a square topsail schooner) from the Farallon Islands to the Golden Gate under bare poles and averaged better than 6.5 knots in 45-55 knots of wind. That's a lot of windage you don't deal with on a modern design.
OK so we have 2 answers; 1. have a support boat on hand and/or 2. don't leave the dock in strong winds.  Maybe in the future they'll make sure option 1 is available.

My boat is down a longish, narrow fairway.  I really don't have a choice but to motor to and from my slip.  I've always got the sails ready to go, but it would be very very 'interesting' if I lost power on a windy day.

 

jesposito

Super Anarchist
I found the RIB as bow thruster interesting. They really needed a bigger one, but the little guy did manage to get the bow around and then the ship just blew backwards into the dock.

I know someone who crewed on the Californian when they tried the same thing and the dinghy engine died at the wrong time, leaving them unable to make a tight turn without sideswipping a few boats :eek:
I don't think it blew backwards, by the look of the thrust and water on the port side they were full throttle in reverse

 

kent_island_sailor

Super Anarchist
27,191
5,119
Kent Island!
That water is engine exhaust I think, not prop wash. The RIB did get them pointed upwind, all they had to do was go. They backed into the boats behind them instead.

Just FYI, the invention of short range steam tugs made sailing ships MUCH more productive in the time period between their invention and steam cargo ships. Getting the last 10 miles into port could be a huge ordeal for ships back in the day.

 

Parma

Super Anarchist
2,989
396
here
The boat managed to reverse direction and there is definitely some prop wash, making it likely that although the props were fouled they were not 100% ineffective.

One possibility is that with the ropes around the props they could not make enough forward momentum to turn the corner against a stiff cross breeze and ended up getting pinned down in the corner.

 

Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
19,320
4,874
Poland
From the linked article in the OP:  "The tall ship is named for Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, a hero in the War of 1812, who is remembered for his command: “Don’t Give Up the Ship.” "

Captain James Lawrence, not Perry uttered those famous words after he was mortally wounded on the frigate Chesapeake.  In 1813 the Chesapeake had left Boston harbor during the war of 1812 and was engaged in battle with the British frigate Shannon.  A few months later, also in 1813, Oliver Hazard Perry, a friend of Lawrence had a blue battle flag made with Lawrence's dying words for his flagship named after Lawrence.  During the battle of Lake Erie the Lawrence suffered severe damage and Perry transfered the flag to the brig Niagra and won the battle.  He sent the famous message after the battle:  "We have met the enemy and they are ours; two ships, two brigs, one schooner and one sloop."

 

Crash

Super Anarchist
5,071
1,003
SoCal
Another interesting footnote is that they did in the end, "give up the ship."  Chesapeake struck to Shannon.Phillip Brooke, Capt of HMS Shannon was seriously wounded as well during the battle, but would survive his injuries.

 

Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
19,320
4,874
Poland
And yet another interesting footnote.  After the battle, Perry returned to Presque Isle Bay, in Erie, PA where his fleet was built built.  His crews wintered there and the Niagara was anchored in a smaller bay on Presque Isle Bay.  The winters there are very harsh and his crew suffered mightily, kind of Perry's version of Washington wintering at Valley Forge during the Revolutionary War.  The small bay is known to this day by its official name,  Misery Bay.  The Niagara was sunk in Misery Bay to preserve it, as well as the Lawrence and a couple of other ships from the original fleet.  The  Niagara was raised and restored in the early 1900s, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Lake Erie.   The other ships were sold and eventually sunk again due to being too deteriorated to be useful.  Eventually the Niagara was rebuilt again and in 1963 it was on display on land at the foot of State street in Erie.  The rebuilt version only contained a piece of the original keel and it probably wasn't even close in appearance to the original ship.  In the 1980s, Melbourne Smith, the builder of the Pride of Baltimore was commissioned to build a new, more historically accurate, sailing version of the Niagara.  Unfortunately no plans existed from the original brig,  The new ship was launched in '88 and finished in 1990.  The new brig, equipped with a diesel engine and modern safety and navigation features remains home ported in Erie, PA (my hometown) and is used for sail training, historical tours and travels around the Great Lakes every season.  It has been designated the flagship of the state of Pennsylvania.  The new ship only contains a few small pieces of timber from the original and is considered a replica, not a restored ship.  

The new Niagara, under sail near Put in Bay, the site of the Battle of Lake Erie, in 2009.

Brig_Niagara_full_sail.jpg

 

Kevlar Edge

Super Anarchist
2,439
26
On the road
I found the RIB as bow thruster interesting. They really needed a bigger one, but the little guy did manage to get the bow around and then the ship just blew backwards into the dock.

I know someone who crewed on the Californian when they tried the same thing and the dinghy engine died at the wrong time, leaving them unable to make a tight turn without sideswipping a few boats :eek:
he saved Intrepid, that was close

 

Mgineo

New member
I found the RIB as bow thruster interesting. They really needed a bigger one, but the little guy did manage to get the bow around and then the ship just blew backwards into the dock.

I know someone who crewed on the Californian when they tried the same thing and the dinghy engine died at the wrong time, leaving them unable to make a tight turn without sideswipping a few boats :eek:
The Rib wihj the 30 hp outboard was doing nothing. Didn't you notice the 2 green Oldport Marine boats that were pushing the ship off of the 12 Meters? I was driving one of them. They both have 100 hp Yanmar diesel engines, and we were barely able to push them off. Fortunately, we were able to push the ship around the corner and kept the 12's from being crunched. By the way, the ship did drop an anchor at one point, without any warning, I was pushing on the bow at the time and it just missed my boat!

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Latest posts




Top