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Super Anarchist
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Rasputin22

Rasputin22
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32 according to google.. including known crashed. not sure the original prototypes(A-12) incorporated that much titanium.


What else could they have used at those speeds? 

Before the A-12, titanium was used only in high-temperature exhaust fairings and other small parts directly related to supporting, cooling, or shaping high-temperature areas on aircraft like those subject to the greatest kinetic heating from the airstream, such as wing leading edges. The A-12, however, was constructed mainly of titanium. Titanium is quite rigid and difficult to machine, which made it difficult to form into curves given available techniques. This made the construction of the leading edges of the wing and similar surfaces difficult to form. The solution was found by machining only small "fillets" of the material with the required shape and then gluing them onto the underlying framework which was more linear. A good example is on the wing; the underlying framework of spars and stringers formed a grid, leaving triangular notches along the leading edge that were filled with fillets.

With the move to the A-12, another improvement in RCS was made by replacing the fillets with new radar-absorbing composite materials made from iron ferrite and silicon laminate, both combined with asbestos to absorb radar returns and make the aircraft more stealthy.[11][12][13]

 

Left Shift

Super Anarchist
10,532
3,272
Seattle
What else could they have used at those speeds? 

Before the A-12, titanium was used only in high-temperature exhaust fairings and other small parts directly related to supporting, cooling, or shaping high-temperature areas on aircraft like those subject to the greatest kinetic heating from the airstream, such as wing leading edges. The A-12, however, was constructed mainly of titanium. Titanium is quite rigid and difficult to machine, which made it difficult to form into curves given available techniques. This made the construction of the leading edges of the wing and similar surfaces difficult to form. The solution was found by machining only small "fillets" of the material with the required shape and then gluing them onto the underlying framework which was more linear. A good example is on the wing; the underlying framework of spars and stringers formed a grid, leaving triangular notches along the leading edge that were filled with fillets.

With the move to the A-12, another improvement in RCS was made by replacing the fillets with new radar-absorbing composite materials made from iron ferrite and silicon laminate, both combined with asbestos to absorb radar returns and make the aircraft more stealthy.[11][12][13]
Up in Betts yard in Anacortes, he's been building a titanium cat.  Apparently, once milled, the off-cut titanium scrap can't be recycled.  Anyone know anything about that?

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
68,784
12,410
Great Wet North
What else could they have used at those speeds? 

Before the A-12, titanium was used only in high-temperature exhaust fairings and other small parts directly related to supporting, cooling, or shaping high-temperature areas on aircraft like those subject to the greatest kinetic heating from the airstream, such as wing leading edges. The A-12, however, was constructed mainly of titanium. Titanium is quite rigid and difficult to machine, which made it difficult to form into curves given available techniques. This made the construction of the leading edges of the wing and similar surfaces difficult to form. The solution was found by machining only small "fillets" of the material with the required shape and then gluing them onto the underlying framework which was more linear. A good example is on the wing; the underlying framework of spars and stringers formed a grid, leaving triangular notches along the leading edge that were filled with fillets.

With the move to the A-12, another improvement in RCS was made by replacing the fillets with new radar-absorbing composite materials made from iron ferrite and silicon laminate, both combined with asbestos to absorb radar returns and make the aircraft more stealthy.[11][12][13]
Best part was the CIA bought it all from the USSR using multiple shell companies. :D

 

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
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Up in Betts yard in Anacortes, he's been building a titanium cat.  Apparently, once milled, the off-cut titanium scrap can't be recycled.  Anyone know anything about that?
Yeah, I can. I designed that boat and the deal is that the scrap has to be re-smelted once it leaves the warehouse. One of the suppliers early in the project offered to do the waterjet cutting of the frames and such from digital cut files in their in house cutting facility. If done under their roof and supervision they would have full 'provenance' of the titanium and would credit us with the scrap value of the unused stock left over after the cutting. Betts had a local guy do the waterjet cutting but after all the shipping and hauling to and from the cutting place and then scrapes getting tossed in the parking lot you aren't going to get any 'returnables'.  So many ways for Ti to get contaminated along the way and there are rigorous conventions for cleaning mill scale and other surface contaminates before any welding takes place. You aren't even supposed to use tool steel punches and brakes or even saw blades on Titanium that aren't new and steel particles even get embedded in to the Ti from grinding wheels and such. Jim has quietly done a remarkable job dealing with such a stubborn material as that project slowly proceeds and has kept the Ti cat and the welding in a separate bldg with positive overpressure to keep the nasties that are part of the composite construction bay adjacent to it. The last photos I say of the second hull are looking pretty good! 

 




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