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hobot

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herbie verstinx

Anarchist
515
266
so. cal.
No, I decided not to go. That show was the reason I became a firefighter and went to paramedic school so I was tempted. I've been to the museum and saw one of the Squad 51's at my neighbor's house (he is a board member of the museum) as it was getting ready for its cross country trip to the Smithsonian. They stopped at a local venue and Tigue and Mantooth were along. I had them sign my own Paramedic certificate. I knew most of the early LA pioneers very well anyway so..........I didn't go.
A friend and fellow racer out of MdR runs and maintains thd website and publications for the museum. It's a cool little museum. Being semi retired I'm thinking of volunteering in the maintenance shop for something to do.
 
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Point Break

Super Anarchist
26,313
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Long Beach, California
The beginnings of paramedic programs in California. In 1969 6 LA County firefighters (LA Class #1) were trained by a group of doctors at Harbor General Hospital and assigned to a nearby fire station (Station 59). The initial training was spearheaded by Dr Michael Criley who wanted to replicate a out of hospital cardiac response unit similar to what he had seen in Northern Ireland….Belfast I believe. That was based out of a hospital. Dr Criley thought the already established staffing and infrastructure of the fire department was a better model and approached LA County FD with the idea. The department agreed. Initially the training was mostly cardiac based. Along the way it was suggested that a trauma element should be added and the curriculum was expanded to take in multiple injuries and illnesses and eventually evolve to the broad scope of practice it is today.

Even though they were trained, they were not authorized to practice that scope of prehospital medicine until the Wedworth/Townsend Paramedic Act was signed into law by Gov Reagan in July 1970. Until then the “paramedics” as they were eventually called were not able to perform any of the advanced life support procedures they had been taught so each call they would swing by Harbor General and pick up an ER Nurse to ride along and perform most of the invasive procedures and drug administrations. The first unit was Squad 59, a green Plymouth station wagon they had painted red. Eventually the concept spread not just through LA County but throughout all California counties one at a time.

I was trained in San Diego County Class 7 in 1976. The small city department I worked in did not have a paramedic program, then 6 of us (two per shift) went to paramedic school and when we graduated 6 months later came back and established the paramedic program in that city. I worked in that program until 1981 when I tested and was hired by a larger so cal department for that paramedic program.

Below is two of the first 6 paramedics with an ER nurse at Harbor and a call on a beach with an ER nurse along. Those were amazing days……..

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veni vidi vici

Omne quod audimus est opinio, non res. Omnia videm
4,520
915
The beginnings of paramedic programs in California. In 1969 6 LA County firefighters (LA Class #1) were trained by a group of doctors at Harbor General Hospital and assigned to a nearby fire station (Station 59). The initial training was spearheaded by Dr Michael Criley who wanted to replicate a out of hospital cardiac response unit similar to what he had seen in Northern Ireland….Belfast I believe. That was based out of a hospital. Dr Criley thought the already established staffing and infrastructure of the fire department was a better model and approached LA County FD with the idea. The department agreed. Initially the training was mostly cardiac based. Along the way it was suggested that a trauma element should be added and the curriculum was expanded to take in multiple injuries and illnesses and eventually evolve to the broad scope of practice it is today.

Even though they were trained, they were not authorized to practice that scope of prehospital medicine until the Wedworth/Townsend Paramedic Act was signed into law by Gov Reagan in July 1970. Until then the “paramedics” as they were eventually called were not able to perform any of the advanced life support procedures they had been taught so each call they would swing by Harbor General and pick up an ER Nurse to ride along and perform most of the invasive procedures and drug administrations. The first unit was Squad 59, a green Plymouth station wagon they had painted red. Eventually the concept spread not just through LA County but throughout all California counties one at a time.

I was trained in San Diego County Class 7 in 1976. The small city department I worked in did not have a paramedic program, then 6 of us (two per shift) went to paramedic school and when we graduated 6 months later came back and established the paramedic program in that city. I worked in that program until 1981 when I tested and was hired by a larger so cal department for that paramedic program.

Below is two of the first 6 paramedics with an ER nurse at Harbor and a call on a beach with an ER nurse along. Those were amazing days……..

View attachment 538064

View attachment 538065
I had a chance to go into the Army PA program that was just starting early 70’s. I was accustomed to great latitude and responsibilities with all sorts of medical therapies and procedures in my time on a internal medicine ward and later in the ER-PreOp in VN. I didn’t think I would be able to do anything close in the civilian world, especially so early in the transition from patient doctor to PA doctor/ patient. I had already found out what I wanted to do in life which is how I became draft eligible after dropping out of my 4 th semester in college to go ocean racing when I managed to squeeze about 8,000 nm ocean sailing before being inducted.
 

Ventucky Red

Super Anarchist
11,421
1,214
I had a chance to go into the Army PA program that was just starting early 70’s. I was accustomed to great latitude and responsibilities with all sorts of medical therapies and procedures in my time on a internal medicine ward and later in the ER-PreOp in VN. I didn’t think I would be able to do anything close in the civilian world, especially so early in the transition from patient doctor to PA doctor/ patient. I had already found out what I wanted to do in life which is how I became draft eligible after dropping out of my 4 th semester in college to go ocean racing when I managed to squeeze about 8,000 nm ocean sailing before being inducted.

The whole physician assistant (PA) program came out of the navy corpsmen and army medics coming back from Viet Nam - had excellent skills and experience but nowhere to practice them.

PAs are pretty much going to be the vanguard of medicine as many MDs are going for the specialist disciplines...

The daughter of a friend of mine from HS is a Navy Hospital Corpsman and has earned all kinds of ratings/certifications along with her college degree while at it. She'll be entering the Navy PA Phase II program in San Diego in another couple of months - when done, with no student debt and a shitload of experience, a commission as a LtJG.
 

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