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hobot

Super Anarchist
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Snaggletooth

SA's Morrelle Compasse
34,759
5,874
You guyes our benig humpes, and notheng moire......
A seventey yeare olde guye desines and buildes a beautifulle environmentte, adapteng to to the natiuralle setteng and the clienttes requesttes...... a stunneng acchievemente to manney.....

Thick of when he came frome.... materialles and meathodes haive advanced incredibley.

You neede to tacke a steppe up frome thet pettey plane youve beene danceng on.

Haive a goode nitte. :)
 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
70,045
13,233
Great Wet North
You guyes our benig humpes, and notheng moire......
A seventey yeare olde guye desines and buildes a beautifulle environmentte, adapteng to to the natiuralle setteng and the clienttes requesttes...... a stunneng acchievemente to manney.....

Thick of when he came frome.... materialles and meathodes haive advanced incredibley.

You neede to tacke a steppe up frome thet pettey plane youve beene danceng on.

Haive a goode nitte. :)
Snaggy, FLW was probably the single greatest American architect ever but his interiors sucked and he was not a nice person.

Live with it.
 

Chris in Santa Cruz CA

Super Anarchist
6,458
1,448
earths surface
Snaggy, FLW was probably the single greatest American architect ever but his interiors sucked and he was not a nice person.

Live with it.
My uncle Ted was a protege and supervised construction of at least one flw home. Ted, the nicest man you would ever know, had to leave his apprenticeship and the fellowship due to the caustic environment. My dear uncle Ted. Far left. Mid to late 40s before starting his own practice in Seattle.

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boomer

Super Anarchist
16,705
1,730
PNW
wtf is that rig swinging out over the truck?
Fairly ingenious if you ask me. BC loggers loader, with the boom built from Douglas Fir logs. That skidder next to it is the shizzle, too. BC Loggers were fairly ingenious in their operations, and still are.

The years between 1900 and the end of WW I witnessed a dramatic development in timber harvesting methods. It was during this time when the overhead skidder and the less elaborate high-lead system were introduced to BC West Coast logging. By extending a hauling line through a block stationed on top of a spar tree, companies could haul the timber out by partially suspending it above the ground. As this practice continued, logging operations resembled giant factories without roofs. And so it wasn’t long before there was a shift from selective logging to clear-cut logging, and coming up with various hoisting equipment made from the materials at hand. Looking at old photos from the British Columbia Archives is a small step toward understanding the mechanics of BC logging history.

Logging’s industrial revolution began in the 1890s when the first steam-powered engine or “donkey” engine was introduced from the United States. A wire or cable was extended from the donkey to the logs where the hooktender supervised the rigging. When everything was set, an engineer engaged the machine and the logs were pulled in. Donkey engines could drag logs up to 150 metres and this made it easier for West Coast loggers to compete with lumbermen who worked in places where the terrain wasn’t as rough.

But while the machine helped to accelerate the logger’s work, it also introduced new frustration and more danger because stumps and timber not worth the trouble of falling presented obstacles that called for a high degree of skill from the hooktender. The danger stemmed from the fact that the power generated by the larger donkey engines was enough to snap the rigging or the cable when a log got caught on an obstacle. The force of a snapped cable was deadly, maiming and killing those about the landing area. The only thing worse, was a choker setter on hillsides, which was probably the most dangerous of all occupations, and if the choker setter lived long enough or wasn't maimed, he progressed to working the landing to become the hook tender, unhooking chokers.
 
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