Re-gluing seam in Corian galley top

nleclerc

New member
48
6
Singapore
My galley top is made of several sections of Corian glued together (looks like not Corian adhesive which leaves a seamless surface).

One of the two seams has opened up by about 0.1-0.2 mm. I am looking for the best way to reglue the seam / fill the gap without taking apart the galley -is there a high viscosity epoxy that could work its way down a 0.1 mm gap? Any other idea?

Thanks in advance

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Leeroy Jenkins

Super Anarchist
1,558
610
Vancouver
I'm amazed that little bit at the corner isn't cracked or broken. Is this a new install?

A kitchen countertop place might be able to help you out with a colour match. Pretty sure it's just corian dust mixed into an adhesive - you could easily make your own from the bottom of the ice box lid. Epoxy is too brittle though.
 

DDW

Super Anarchist
6,525
1,091
Corian makes methacylate adhesive that is color matched to each color of Corian. However they are very provincial about it, and will not sell it to mere plebeians. There are other suppliers which also color match adhesive to Corian, and are happy to sell to anyone with the money. It works about the same.

The problem will be cleaning the joint enough to get a bond. Then you will have to overfill and refinish.

If the Corian was installed rigidly, it will crack again - it is supposed to float on a few dots of silicone.
 

CaptainAhab

Anarchist
844
230
South Australia
It’s common to caulk these seams with white silicone

very difficult to structurally support the corian and prevent movement
Bull shit

It's common to glue up acrylic countertops and set them on silicone. The seams should never open up. I've been in the cabinetmaking game for 30 years, I haven't seen a failure like that. I suspect it was bonded together with West System epoxy or the like. Not the proper acrylic adhesive. Working Corian/acrylic is child's play. Not many rules to follow.
 

Sailabout

Super Anarchist
Bull shit

It's common to glue up acrylic countertops and set them on silicone. The seams should never open up. I've been in the cabinetmaking game for 30 years, I haven't seen a failure like that. I suspect it was bonded together with West System epoxy or the like. Not the proper acrylic adhesive. Working Corian/acrylic is child's play. Not many rules to follow.
how about when the boat bends, will the corian bend?
 

DDW

Super Anarchist
6,525
1,091
Working with Corian isn't rocket science for sure, but there are at least some rules. One is not to have a sharp inside corner, particularly where there is a joint, as it is prone to cracking at that stress riser. DuPont is adamant on this point. It is less sensitive than their literature suggests, but sensitive. Corian will bend a little, much more than the boat - if your counter breaks due to hull bending, the hull is already in two pieces and the counter of little concern. A greater concern is differential thermal expansion with the substrate and surrounding cabinetry. That's why you are supposed to set it on dots of silicone.
 

nleclerc

New member
48
6
Singapore
Thanks all for the replies / comments. So if I summarize:
* Very likely the yard who installed it did not use Corian adhesive (in fact, they did not respect Corian rules with respect to sharp inside corner)
* Check how the Corian top is mounted - silicone or screws
* Get a kitchen / Corian specialist to come on board and assess how best to fill the gap:
* presumably if the top is mounted on silicone, then Corian adhesive
* if the top is screwed down, maybe silicone?

Thanks all
 

DDW

Super Anarchist
6,525
1,091
Is the counter edge underneath something, so that it is difficult to remove? If not, and if installed properly on silicone, you can get the pieces out and glue them properly then reinstall.

Is it a solid pattern, or something with flecks and/or swirls? If the former, it might be possible to route a slot at the joint and fill, Corian can be refinished just like wood. If the latter, the joint will be obvious if filled, it needs to be glued tight.
 

HotSnail

Member
91
17
Flânsum
From what I see on the photos it isn't installed as one part but as three separate parts to make mounting less critical. If this is the cast I would clean out the seam as well as I could en re-seal it with white silicone.

If you want to glue it with the corona glue I'd take the top out of the bout. The acrylic glue is tho thick to go down in so small a seam, so you would need to take out the worktop, re-glue and then re mount the worktop on board.
 

nleclerc

New member
48
6
Singapore
Unfortunately I cant remove the top without removing the wooden fiddles which would be a nightmare, so i have ruled this out for now.

When meeting with my boat carpenter today, we discussed the possibility of cutting a shallow/ narrow V-groove along the seam and push down some Corian adhesive with a spatula.

My boat is in Phuket (Thailand) and I am flying back to Singapore tomorrow. I will check from under how the top is mounted tomorrow but continue to weight options for a couple of weeks before I go back to Phuket and decide on a course of action.
 




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