Re-rigging process suggestions

DaveShap

New member
All,

Our "new to us" Taswell 49, has a 12 year old rig, and the professional rig survey noted a handful of little things we are working through, but we are considering doing a re-wire of the boat ourselves (I have some quotes for yards to do it, but I could buy a small house for that).  I have no issue going up the mast, and doing a one-by-one (or two-by-two) wire swap.

My question(s) is what is the correct "order" to do the swap in, as in which wire first and which wire next (or does it not matter)?.  Also, while I sort of understand the general physics, I am not totally clear on the forces on the mast at rest (I am not a mechanical engineer).  Should I assume that every wire represents a "force" that needs to be replaced as I go?  Or is most of the rig really only used with the sail up?  I guess I just don't want to be hanging halfway up the mast, release a wire, and break the mast in half.

The Taswell 49 has an inner forestay and runners that are not always "in use", so they could be used during the swap.  The Taswell also has the usual complement of forestay, backstay (split -not adjustable), upper intermediate, and lower shrouds.  Boat will be in the water if it matters.

Any advice/help is appreciated.

Dave

 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
6,793
1,139
San Diego
Carefully look at all T/B's to determine if rigging lengths are correct. T/B should be 2/3 closed. Carefully look at all t/b's & toggles for ANY signs of bending, twisting, other physical abuse. If any is found replace these items along with the wire. Slack all the rigging off to barely snug. This relieves any inherent loads from the rigging. Measure each pair of wires - center of pin (in eyes & forks) to end of threaded studs. Measure pin & thread diameters. Or just take down wire & deliver to rig shop with any changes noted, & let them figure out lengths/fittings. Rigging below the masthead can be removed without substitutions - IF your spreader ends allow for removing a single wire at a time. Masthead wires require rigging a temporary replacement. Drop the furler on the ground & run a new h/s into it. Most likely you'll have to pull a bare wire end thru & then install a mechanical fitting. Don't even think about dis-assemblig furler, unless you have to replace foils.

If any of this is confusing hire the pro's.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
68,723
12,373
Great Wet North
Carefully look at all T/B's to determine if rigging lengths are correct. T/B should be 2/3 closed.
Why? As long as the threads are fully engaged and pinned you ain't getting any more strength or utility by closing them more.

Rigging wire seldom shrinks, likewise, masts seldom stretch.

 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
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1,236
worldwide
Why? As long as the threads are fully engaged and pinned you ain't getting any more strength or utility by closing them more.

Rigging wire seldom shrinks, likewise, masts seldom stretch.
Past riggers may have replaced ends and kept the old shroud 

long turnbuckles tell the story 

 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
6,793
1,139
San Diego
Allows you to connect/disconnect the t/b parts without risking damaging the threads. Allows some margin of safety if the t/b becomes un-pinned. Usually allows a one time/one end replacement on the wire. Allows for change in mast rake/tuning.

 

ghost37

Member
185
35
Boston
No reason you can't do a routine re-rig with the mast up despite what others said. Mast support is a bit easier for you, as it was for us, because I assume you have a stout, keel stepped spar. Seems like you could benefit from talking to a pro rigger on gameplan, so I would definitely do that even if you plan to do the work yourself. They can give you some tips on loading / unloading and pre-fab the stays for you if you plan on something like swaged tops and mechanical/ sta-lok bottoms. Goes without saying, but you really need to be sure you or your sig other are comfortable actually doing hours of work up there. 

 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
6,251
1,236
worldwide
No reason you can't do a routine re-rig with the mast up despite what others said. Mast support is a bit easier for you, as it was for us, because I assume you have a stout, keel stepped spar. Seems like you could benefit from talking to a pro rigger on gameplan, so I would definitely do that even if you plan to do the work yourself. They can give you some tips on loading / unloading and pre-fab the stays for you if you plan on something like swaged tops and mechanical/ sta-lok bottoms. Goes without saying, but you really need to be sure you or your sig other are comfortable actually doing hours of work up there. 
You will be drilling and riveting aloft 

Tip cups are troublesome aloft

don’t do it 

2B252A23-5F10-42D8-B2EB-73221A0D2DF9.png

 

ghost37

Member
185
35
Boston
You will be drilling and riveting aloft 

Tip cups are troublesome aloft

don’t do it 
As I said, if you are not comfortable doing the work up there, don't do it. We did and it saved us a significant amount of time, effort, money and disruption not taking the mast down. 

 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
6,251
1,236
worldwide
As I said, if you are not comfortable doing the work up there, don't do it. We did and it saved us a significant amount of time, effort, money and disruption not taking the mast down. 
I don’t know the mast or his location  but I regularly have similar masts pulled ...500 out and 500 in ,... full mast disassembly , re rig , reassemble is two days work 

 

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