Refinish or replace washboards?

Y’all gave such good advice on my rudder repair that I figured I’d ask about a totally different project. 
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The PO didn’t really care for the bright work. The wood seems sound, but I cannot picture how to sand this without disassembling it. 

Suggestions?

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SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
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Great Wet North
Louvered doors can be sanded with paper wrapped around a paint stir stick.

It's incredibly tedious but not difficult in the sense of requiring skill.

Personally, I'd change to tinted plexi panels.

 

Jules

Super Anarchist
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Punta Gorda
As long as the louvers aren't rotten, I say refinish.  I did that to our washboards and they almost look brand new.

But like Sloop said, prepping the louvers is incredibly tedious.  For the sanding stick, I used PSA sandpaper on long shims.  For cleaning out the corners, I used chisels and floats.  Time consuming but effective.

WB_prep_001.jpg

 

El Borracho

Verified User
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Pacific Rim
Sometimes those things knock apart easier than one might guess. Making sanding much easier. 

Consider varnish with paint topcoat to greatly improve your life.

 

Blue Crab

benthivore
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Outer Banks
As long as the louvers aren't rotten, I say refinish.  I did that to our washboards and they almost look brand new.

But like Sloop said, prepping the louvers is incredibly tedious.  For the sanding stick, I used PSA sandpaper on long shims.  For cleaning out the corners, I used chisels and floats.  Time consuming but effective.

View attachment 405248
Porn, plain and simple

 

El Borracho

Verified User
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Pacific Rim
Do you mean something like AwlWood? https://www.awlgrip.com/products/varnishes/awlwood-clear

I've been wanting to try this stuff out anyhow.

I guess there's also the Interlux equivalent https://www.interlux.com/en/us/boat-paint/varnish/perfection-plus
No, I meant solid paint. Like Brightsides. White, Dark Green, Black, whatever the trim color is. Mine is black which is a good match with stainless and the various hatches and tinted portlights. You can put a good coat of varnish under the paint if you feel like somebody (who oddly prefers varnish and sandpaper to sailing) may want to easily strip it off someday.

 

Zach

Member
160
19
Beaufort, NC
As long as the louvers aren't rotten, I say refinish.  I did that to our washboards and they almost look brand new.

But like Sloop said, prepping the louvers is incredibly tedious.  For the sanding stick, I used PSA sandpaper on long shims.  For cleaning out the corners, I used chisels and floats.  Time consuming but effective.

View attachment 405248
I think this is the first time I've seen anyone use a float, in a sentence since the millennium. 

 

Gouvernail

Lottsa people don’t know I’m famous
38,010
5,544
Austin Texas
Ensign? We are currently putting the finish on a new set of doors my neighbor built for our friend. 
Our friend has a great boat cover from Bartlett Sails that doesn’t let in a drop of rain. 
so... About ten years ago our friend refinished all the teak except seats and cockpit floor with clear Awlgrip. He keeps those well oiled.

anyway.... his old doors looked slightly better than the photos in the OP. 
 

we calculated the price of the wood vs the price of the sandpaper and $10 per hour for his retired guy labor and decided to build from scratch. 
  If we had to do it ourselves at shop rate  the price of new doors is way lower than the cost of bringing old wood back to life..,,, and the new doors are made with better glues than existed fifty eight years ago when the originals were built. 
 

no matter how you look at it, the price difference is no more than a few hamburgers.

If you have the skills to build new doors, I suggest you go new. 

 

Jules

Super Anarchist
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3,399
Punta Gorda
If you have the skills to build new doors, I suggest you go new.
Building doors like that would be a challenge.  It's the louvers that makes it such a challenge and it's also the louvers that make them so visually appealing.  But being able to save the originals might add more to the appeal. 

That being said, building new, it might also be worth considering washboards instead of hinged doors.  Washboards hold up better to impacts.

 

Bull City

A fine fellow
7,064
2,678
North Carolina
I think this is the first time I've seen anyone use a float, in a sentence since the millennium. 
3. a hand tool with a rectangular blade used for smoothing plaster or concrete. 

4. [SIZE=12.633600234985352px]chiefly [/SIZE]North American a soft drink with a scoop of ice cream floating in it: root-beer floats.

It has been a while for me too.

 

Jules

Super Anarchist
8,596
3,399
Punta Gorda
I think this is the first time I've seen anyone use a float, in a sentence since the millennium. 
3. a hand tool with a rectangular blade used for smoothing plaster or concrete. 

4. [SIZE=12.633600234985352px]chiefly [/SIZE]North American a soft drink with a scoop of ice cream floating in it: root-beer floats.
5.   Cheek Floats: ideal for working recessed areas like mortise cheeks.
6.   Mortise Floats: for squaring up mortise ends, fitting wedges in tusk tenons and other trimming jobs.
7.   Face Floats: for accurately trimming tenons, tongues or other such surfaces.
8.   Side Floats: for working the sides of wedge mortises to open them from the initial sinking.
9.   Edge Floats: for opening and sizing molding plane wedge mortises.
10. Bed Floats: for fitting the iron to the bed of the plane, or trimming and final surfacing of chamfers and other work.
11. Small Cheek Floats: for sizing of the mortise to match standardized wedges, and are useful for a number of other fitting and clean-up jobs.

And that's all I have to say about floats.

 

ryley

Super Anarchist
5,516
666
Boston, MA
If it were me, I would remove the doors, use a stripper like CitriStrip, use a bleach and water solution to kill the  mold, then apply wood bleach (oxalyic acid).  Sanding from there should be manageable.  Apply penetrating epoxy and varnish.
If you plan to use awlwood, do NOT use oxalic acid after you strip and sand - from the data sheet "Never use teak cleaners - Oxalic acid residues impede proper curing of both primers and topcoats."

 




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