repainting the cockpit

Delta Dog

Member
367
24
Nor Cal
Its 40 years old and a mess of various old paint jobs on a modified fiberglass cockpit. I've just done a bit repair and think I'd like to roll on some paint to get everything to the same color. Not looking for a mirror finish or anyhting of that sort, just want to clean it up.

What products to use and what is the right prep? I'd thinking of wet sanding with 600 to a smooth, clean finish and doing something with a light foam roller.

 

py26129

Super Anarchist
2,855
193
Montreal
My Dad used Brightsides on his deck and cockpit and it went on easy and looked fine 4 years later, when he sold the boat.

 

Alcatraz5768

Super Anarchist
Go and talk to a car paint supplier. They should be able to supply you with a 2k 2 part system with a brushing additive to extend the tack time. The product I'm using consists of an epoxy undercoat that's recoatable in about 2hours with the topcoat without sanding if your undercoat finish is good enough. Will be heaps cheaper as it doesn't have "marine" in the title.

 

Black Jack

Super Anarchist
first question - What color do you want? Then are you going to lay down any light nonskid? Thirdly - Where do you keep the boat? Finally Is your boat going to be in the show or is it a working vessel?

Funny how many peoples express horror after they told me the 3 year old paint looks great. "Yeah, its semi gloss Rustoluem." I lay down a decent primer then at 10 bucks a quart; Rustoluem dries in a few hours of warm UV light, it as tough or tougher i think than Brightsides, washes up quickly, easy enough to sand and fills in easy when scrapped by a handle, knife or dropped bottle opener. Best of all nobody needs to wear non marking topsiders to crew. Use a green abrasive pad, cheap foam roller and grab the old paint which covers things nicely when you want to impress your mother-in-law.

 
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Bruno

Super Anarchist
3,958
136
600?

As a fraction of the total cost of a decent ( not great) paint job, paint, primer, and their associated supplies, are relatively small. So spending 2x as much on a better system may increase your total cost by 10% with the result that you get a 100% better job. Up to each individual.

 

Alcatraz5768

Super Anarchist
The ONLY automotive product that might be if some use in a sailboat cockpit is truck bed liner which does make a pretty decent sole coating.

Car paint suppliers don't sell any costings designed to stand up to shoe bottoms or even

clothed asses

Nothing but mute gelcoat will provide the performance of original gelcoat but it sure is a bitch to apply.

For the do it yourself maintenance guy, I suggest you go get advice and materials from your local friendly boat repairman

If his advice doesn't make you feel confident about your plans and skills, hire him to do it RIGHT with a warranty for you
By your rationale, car paint is not tougher than even enamel, which has been used on boats got decades. If you read my post, I said to talk to a car paint supplier, not use car paint. Most car paint suppliers also supply industrial and marine coatings, which in a lot of cases are the same stuff, but in a different can. A lot of people are scared of using and automotive finishes on their boats even though the auto industry will have exponentially more r and d effort put into modern paint finishes.

In the next month I will be helping my mate roll and tip his mast and topsides, and I am happy to share the details and end result if you are interested. He has already done the boom and it looks sprayed and has been smacked with the kite pole numerous times without even a scratch, and the paint was a automotive dtm (direct to metal) product, just sanded and applied.

 

figgy

Member
104
0
I said to talk to a car paint supplier, not use car paint. Most car paint suppliers also supply industrial and marine coatings, which in a lot of cases are the same stuff, but in a different can. A lot of people are scared of using and automotive finishes on their boats even though the auto industry will have exponentially more r and d effort put into modern paint finishes.

In the next month I will be helping my mate roll and tip his mast and topsides, and I am happy to share the details and end result if you are interested. He has already done the boom and it looks sprayed and has been smacked with the kite pole numerous times without even a scratch, and the paint was a automotive dtm (direct to metal) product, just sanded and applied.
Two-part Industrial and marine coatings are not the same in any case I've been in. I do industrial coatings and get my material from my local Kelly-Moore. They carry AkzoNobel products that I use here in the agriculture industry, and since PPG owns A.N., the products from PPG (and support) are easily had without the wait or hassle.

Some of you guys should learn to talk to the people that specialize in the coatings themselves. Give PPG a call direct, they know what you want

DTM can be real good. Properly prepped, I've seen it last years in harsh environments. On a fresh surface, three coats, each 2 mil thick (dries to about 1 each) can give an awesome finish that will last.

 

Delta Dog

Member
367
24
Nor Cal
Thanks for all the advice. The boat is old and has had major ockpit repairs done. I'm not looking for a "professional finish" and may very well have the deck's redone preofessional over the next couple year. My desire is for something clean that will last a couple years.

From reading the notes and checking around online, Interlux Toplac seems to keep coming up as a product the will yield a good finish with amateur application. Any pointers in this direction are most welcome.

 




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