Retirement planning - how much does it cost!

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,594
3,345
I agree. But I don't need a shower - my best bathing is with a big pot of water, a small wooden stool, a dipper, a big bar of soap and a rough face cloth.  The water can be cold or hot depending upon the climate/ time of year. I picked up the habit living in the countryside / windsurfing in Taiwan.  
On the boat I'm still happy with a deck shower. But it's about the same in that I often sit down on the deck and I don't want to be arrested.

It's rarely hot as our engine isn't often run for long (that saves ice too).  

 

Ishmael

Granfalloon
58,419
16,284
Fuctifino
On the boat I'm still happy with a deck shower. But it's about the same in that I often sit down on the deck and I don't want to be arrested.

It's rarely hot as our engine isn't often run for long (that saves ice too).  
We have a couple of these:

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Nice hot water if it's sunny out. If it's cloudy, it's the kettle and a washcloth.

 

Elegua

Generalissimo
On the boat I'm still happy with a deck shower. But it's about the same in that I often sit down on the deck and I don't want to be arrested.

It's rarely hot as our engine isn't often run for long (that saves ice too).  
I do mine in the cockpit and I have weather cloths, so no worries about arrest.  It cleans out the cockpit and me at the same time. I can get hot water from our diesel heater, but most often I use the kettle left over from dinner. 

 
We sailed for two years. 2014-15 Florida to Europe and back up through the Islands. It ran about Eighty thousand for two years. We had a well prepared 37 footer. One of the thing I didn’t consider was money exchange rate. Going over when the dollar was weak added quite a bit of expense to the trip.
 
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SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
72,102
14,519
Great Wet North
That sums up my life in recent years...

Me to wife: "Have you seen my car keys?"
Wife to me: "Did you look in the refrigerator?"
I always put my keys, wallet, glasses, phone etc. in the same place so I never have to hunt for them.

However my life has been cursed by living with people who never do it and expect me to find them.

When I was a kid it was my dad "Where are my keys etc. etc".

Then I had 10 years of peace when I lived on my own.

Then I got married and it was back to "Where's my purse etc. etc."

In 71 years I have only had 10 years free from it. :mad:
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
4,050
2,969
I always put my keys, wallet, glasses, phone etc. in the same place so I never have to hunt for them.

However my life has been cursed by living with people who never do it and expect me to find them.

When I was a kid it was my dad "Where are my keys etc. etc".

Then I had 10 years of peace when I lived on my own.

Then I got married and it was back to "Where's my purse etc. etc."

In 71 years I have only had 10 years free from it. :mad:
Much of what I do is done on autopilot as part of normal routine. If I get distracted from that normal routine, or don't follow the sequence, all bets are off.

If I concentrate on every action as I do it, I never have a problem. But who does that?

I've developed the habit of writing a brief list of my specific "must not forget" responsibilities for the next day -- doctor's appointments, work items due, required communications with other people, things like birthdays--down on a notebook pad, and placing it on my computer keyboard when I turn off the computer every night.

There's also a wall calendar above the printer that is updated on a daily basis.

I can't count on memory alone to make sure I do all those things, although it turns out that the mere action of writing things down is usually enough to remember them the next day. I'm not going to test that hypothesis, however.

It's a combination of a lifetime of obsessive/compulsive behavior, coupled with a real fear of forgetting things. It's particularly important when you are still working in your mid-70s, as I am.

Now, what were we talking about here?
 
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