Road Salt

Snaggletooth

SA's Morrelle Compasse
33,750
5,441
Even New Englanders can't drive on ice..... Well..... You can start driving on ice, but you can't stop.... At least not where you want to stop. The ditch, or the tree is usually the destination on those days.
I blamme 4WD, iddiottes suddenley thick they cane go anny whearre.
 

Bugsy

Super Anarchist
2,502
781
Canada
Where I live sections of road that are adjacent to sensitive and/or drinking water supplies are clearly marked as 'no road salt zones'.
 

billsreef

Anarchist
653
330
Miami
"It's O/K, I've got 4 wheel drive"

They never seem to grasp the idea that all vehicles are 4 wheel brake.
Also doesn't do much on ice. Hit an ice patch buried under several inches of snow once, and found myself doing a slow motion 360. Despite having the 4 wheel drive engaged and going slow.

As for desalination of a pond, I got no idea other than an expensive desalination plant.
 

Snaggletooth

SA's Morrelle Compasse
33,750
5,441
I thick Mickey hase oune that folded oune waye ist a desal plante and folded anorthere waye ist a dinke. Theire mabey orthere parttes invollved. Caulleng Mickey @mikewof
 

mikewof

mikewof
45,639
1,209
I thick Mickey hase oune that folded oune waye ist a desal plante and folded anorthere waye ist a dinke. Theire mabey orthere parttes invollved. Caulleng Mickey @mikewof

I owe Dyslexic Dog for kicking my ass in the NHL Playoff pool so many years in a row.

I bet that there is a saline gradient in the lake, with the O2 depleted part of the lake much more saline than the top bits, and as the lake heats up in the summer, the gradient becomes more pronounced than the fall or spring. So, to mitigate the damage, it might be best to avoid mixing (like with the bubblers) until the most contaminated bits can be pumped out. Desalination is going to likely be too expensive for remediation, and it will leave a bunch of high-salt brine anyway that has to be managed. A workable approach is likely to pump the most contaminated parts into some "trash" land like a leaching field, and seed it with some fast-growing, salt-tolerant plants like Reed Grass (and some others here). If necessary, salt-uptake plants can be mowed and sent to the landfill if the leaching field gets too contaminated by the salt.

It would help to get some water samples at different parts and depths in the lake now while it is still hot, and then take samples again in the winter and spring, so you can see what you're dealing with. A saline tester is pretty cheap, less than $50, and you can pull the samples up with the variable depth sampling system you already used. When you pump out the worst of the water, it needs to be carefully pumped out with the right input diameter and flow rate to keep the input flow laminar and avoid turbulence that would mix the fucked up water with the half-decent water. It will also help to do it at the right time of the year, winter might be perfect, depending on how deep the lake freezes, because the highly saline water will be concentrated away. Short of hiring a bunch of 5,000 gallons road tankers and sending the contaminated water to a well-injection site, (which would be expensive) I don't know of a way to avoid stressing the leaching field. But it may not be a major problem depending on what you have there.

Then as the contaminated water is pumped out and removed, the total salt concentration would go down as the lake refills through rain and presumably clean flows. After the worst of it is removed, then the phosphate and algae can be managed, and then the water reoxygenated with tolerant fish stock. Of course @See Level has the right point, the salt needs to be replaced with sand, which is better than salt and better than nothing, or else the problem is never going to clear up.
 
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WhoaTed

Antichrist
1,139
371
Holland, MI
Where I live sections of road that are adjacent to sensitive and/or drinking water supplies are clearly marked as 'no road salt zones'.
They do the same here (SW Michigan) near the many fruit fields and orchards but not near the many small lakes/ponds like DD’s that are near roads. There are many folks in his predicament, as someone mentioned above the DNR may be able to help, and possibly one of MSU’s Extension programs may be interested in some way.
 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
68,605
12,299
Great Wet North
says the guy from the wet coast of Canada..... when was the last time you saw snow? in person.
Every winter.

I also grew up in the desert where we had snow for months every winter and I skied for years so driving on winter mountain roads is second nature.

Watch "Highway through Hell" - I have driven that road countless times.
 

Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
19,323
4,879
Poland
Sand is only minimally effective, and it does nothing under certain temperatures. Potasium acetate works well, and is (mostly) environmentally friendly. It also won't eat your car.
That and calcium magnesium acetate are better for the environment and work better than salt, but cost far more than salt.

Of course in the long run it's cheaper to use the more expensive deicers if you count the cost of the environmental damage of salt, but who ever looks at the long run nowadays?
 

Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
19,323
4,879
Poland
We do better on snow than drivers in LA or TX do in the rain.
When I lived in San Antonio, TX driving was a real treat. People would drive into flooded low water crossings and get swept away regularly. And when there was a freeze in the winter and the roads had a thin layer of ice on them, the entire city would shut down. Of course all of the people with their SUVs and pick up trucks would go out anyway, and it was like a demolition derby. Idjits.
 




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