Roller furling fowl-up in Patagonia

plenamar

Member
368
54
Buenos Aires
Is the OP still with us?
Yes, I'm here. Thanks for your replies.

I conclude:

(1) Yes, the sail was an original (oldish) G cut to yankee shape

(2) Top of sail possibly too narrow

(3) Roller-furling with wind free tends to make top of sail lag to leeward and not roll correctly. Possibly have to sail to 100-120 apparent

(4) I don't have the roller furling/foil model here, but it seems of top-notch construction and maintainance. Possibly French and somewhat oversized for our 36 ft boat.  

 

Jud - s/v Sputnik

Super Anarchist
6,221
1,706
Canada
Yes, I'm here. Thanks for your replies.

I conclude:

(1) Yes, the sail was an original (oldish) G cut to yankee shape

(2) Top of sail possibly too narrow

(3) Roller-furling with wind free tends to make top of sail lag to leeward and not roll correctly. Possibly have to sail to 100-120 apparent

(4) I don't have the roller furling/foil model here, but it seems of top-notch construction and maintainance. Possibly French and somewhat oversized for our 36 ft boat.  
I’m new to roller furling, having installed a rebuilt Profurl on my boat exactly a year ago.  I’ve used it once or twice on someone else’s boat previously.  (On one occasion, mid-Pacific, I broke the furling line...thank f’ing god we had a a spare on board...)

So far, we’ve been in one 30+ knot blow where it was pretty critical to get a lot of sail in quickly - we were going downwind and we’re way overpowered...for too long.  Have had another situation but in less wind more off the wind, roughly on the beam.  Neither felt super comfortable reefing in.  It wasn’t easy.
 

Reading about your account makes me wonder where to get a “guide” of some sort to using roller furling - how to use it best/most efficiently/to avoid stressing the rig, etc (esp. in big winds), etc.  Anyone know of such a “guide”?  If single handing, I realize I need to know a lot more esp. of at sea (and not just local sailing).

 
Last edited by a moderator:

kent_island_sailor

Super Anarchist
27,221
5,136
Kent Island!
I’m new to roller furling, having installed a rebuilt Profurl on my boat exactly a year ago.  I’ve used it once or twice on someone else’s boat previously.  (On one occasion, mid-Pacific, I broke the furling line...thank f’ing god we had a a spare on board...)

So far, we’ve been in one 30+ knot blow where it was pretty critical to get a lot of sail in quickly - we were going downwind and we’re way overpowered...for too long.  Have had another situation but in less wind more off the wind, roughly on the beam.  Neither felt super comfortable reefing in.  It wasn’t easy.
 

Reading about your account makes me wonder where to get a “guide” of some sort to using roller furling - how to use it best/most efficiently/to avoid stressing the rig, etc (esp. in big winds), etc.  Anyone know of such a “guide”?  If single handing, I realize I need to know a lot more esp. of at sea (and not just local sailing).
Most roller furling gear is NOT designed to be used under sheet-load tension, i.e. slowly rolling it in under load keeping the sail pulling. I think - maybe - ProFurl may be an exception, you need to check.

Other hints:

1. NEVER EVER let it run free to unfurl. This is very hard on the gear and liable to make a big tangle out of the line around the drum.

2. I always ease the last couple inches out slowly to prevent tangles at the drum.

3. When furling I usually try to have the boat about 30 degrees off the wind.

4. Unless I just can't help it for some reason, I never let the sheet just fly. This is also hard on the gear, the sails, and tends to throw loops in the sheets.

5. I keep *slight* tension on the sheet to fill the sail * a little bit* for a smooth tight roll, but not much tension.

6. I pull the sail in enough to get a wrap or two of jib sheet around it.

7. If the furl is bad with white cloth showing, I do it over. UV is the enemy!

8. At least for my Harken gear, if it takes all your strength, something is wrong. It is not supposed to be all that hard to do.

9. When in doubt, do not persist until it is jammed at 50%. Let the sail back out and drop it on deck.

10. The drag of the rolled up sail is very significant at 50-100+ knots. Take the damned thing down if a hurricane is approaching.

11. If you ignore number 10, do not count on just the furling line to hold the sail. Wrap some line around it and tie it off real well.

12. A sail furled to storm jib size <> a storm jib. You won't get too windward very well in 50 knots with that big roll of sail providing drag and a crap airfoil, a real storm jib is way better. It is also hard on the sail, the sail was not designed to be used that way.

13. If reaching in 40 knots and you want a tiny bit more sail, use freaking gloves to handle the furling line. The wet line can slip on bare skin and also give you a rope burn and then you have it all out and need to get it back in with 40+ across the deck with a burned hand while your wife asks WTF is going on up there with all the noise and heeling. Not that I did that...........that you know of :rolleyes:

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Ishmael

52,336
12,173
Fuctifino
14. Run the furling line through a ratchet block, that way every inch you get in doesn't immediately run back out.

15. I like to furl with the genoa blanketed behind the main. Much easier, much less stress on the sail.

16. I take one turn of sheet around each winch, it gives just enough friction to make the roll much smoother.

17. If it's really windy I will take a turn of the furling line around a winch to help hold it. I do not use a winch handle.

 




Top