rs aero

cavi

Member
237
0
Red Bluff Ca
Maybe RS could offer a layaway, where you make payments for a year and get your boat upon final payment? This way there is no interest, yes I know I can save the money and then buy the boat, but that never happens, this way I would be obligated...

 

Reht

Super Anarchist
2,758
6
You're probably thinking of the D-zero. The D-one has a kite (was released around the same time as the RS100) and is a bit of a different kind of boat.

Just trying to make sure we all keep track of what we're talking about. With all the little single-handed boats emerging these days it's a fun time to watch what could happen to growth in that sector of sailing.

 

ortegakid

Super Anarchist
2,603
161
Whitesboro,TEXAS
And the ones you raced with are new rules, real PN # is around 75!

I really hope this boat makes it. I really like the D-one also but I honestly think this boat has better chances, if from nothing else other than the fact that RS has a decent dealer network and soo many other successful boats in the dinghy catagory.

I bought a Raider Turbo last year and it does exactly what I wanted it to do. It carries me, I can singlehand it, and I can sail it with a crew also. Honestly I have come to like it much more with a crew than singlehanded as it is soo sensitive to weight shifts, with a crew it is much more stable. Anyway the biggest issue is that they do not sell enough of these boats to form enough local fleets. Everyone who buys one or sails one loves it but no takers. I feel it is just not enough dealers and not enough marketing. I have many people calling for info on my boat, but they always ask where can they see one, and the answer is there arnt many and that scares alot of people. The issue comes down to racing, since I am by myself I get bunched in with other boats. My boat raced a couple of weeks ago and got thrown in with the IC, they are a 79 dpn while mine is a 89.4 Tough to even compete and finish on time.

So I went out and bought a old laser to have fun racing in a one design. I hope in the future I could get a RS Aero in place of the laser!!
 

Fleet3

New member
35
0
Cavi did you race at Whiskeytown over Memorial Day? We had our Banshee Fleet there for some good racing. The high winds on Sunday took a toll on the old boats knocking out 3 of the 10. Aeros on the Inland Lake Circuit could be fun if there were enough boats for one design. That is going to be the issue - getting enough boats out there and getting the sailors to show up at the same Regatta. My take is that Portsmouth handicapped racing is a waste of time and money - it is all about the ratings, not the race. It makes tennis look appealing.

 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
44,145
9,558
Eastern NC
..... ... ...

My take is that Portsmouth handicapped racing is a waste of time and money - it is all about the ratings, not the race. It makes tennis look appealing.
That depends on what you consider most important.

1- Sailing

2- Ensuring the right people win

Handicap fleet racing can be a lot of fun if you don't take yourself too seriously. Look at how many people mock PHRF (including me) and look at how many people keep racing PHRF (including me). Caveat: I have chops from a bunch of one-design classes. And I already have enough silver/glass knickknacks to last me a while, don't need more to show off.

FB- Doug

 
I sailed Cavi's Raider at Whiskeytown. What a beautiful place to sail. Think lakes of northern Italy.

Yes, Portsmouth Handicap racing can be frustrating. Yet, I think you will find that for a while RS Areo owners will be sailing in handicap fleets. Might as well make the best of it.

On the Raider I was handicapped by a really small screecher and a really clueless skipper, me. Seems that everywhere I went on Saturday on that lake was where the locals never go. You Banshees beat me to a leeward mark in a light air race Saturday when I sat near a cove for a full ten minutes.

Yet, I had a great time all weekend. It's the sailing and the people.

Can you tell who is sailing which boat once we all get ashore?

Get enthusiastic people aboard a class and it will thrive. If the enthusiasm for the RS Areo on media sites is any indicaiton, it will be a rousing success!

Dave Ellis

Tampa Bay, Florida

Cavi did you race at Whiskeytown over Memorial Day? We had our Banshee Fleet there for some good racing. The high winds on Sunday took a toll on the old boats knocking out 3 of the 10. Aeros on the Inland Lake Circuit could be fun if there were enough boats for one design. That is going to be the issue - getting enough boats out there and getting the sailors to show up at the same Regatta. My take is that Portsmouth handicapped racing is a waste of time and money - it is all about the ratings, not the race. It makes tennis look appealing.
 

WestCoast

Super Anarchist
One of the things that inticed me to fly there specifically to test the boat was just how many new singlehanders were coming out all at once.

--

Someone else sort of mentioned it, but it's very true that there is a big difference between *launching* a new singlehanded boat and actually delivering and supporting one worldwide.

The reason I bothered to go and see the boat so early, knowing it would eventually come to the states anyway... was that I know RS can do the global distribution on this boat.

That makes a very very significant impact on the boats ability to generate fleets in all sorts of locations. Means multiple dealers in many countries doing demos... organizing events, showing the boat off.

With no disrespect to any of the smaller manufacturers.... the best boat in the world isn't going to gain serious traction without a robust and proven supply chain.

 
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jwlbrace

Super Anarchist
1,245
1
A34 - due south
That's a double edge sword though... Kirby Torch anyone?

It's interesting, when looking at global dinghy classes, those who we could say are the most successful in terms of reach and recognition, many of them are not owned by one manufacturer with a distribution model. Each of those has a supply chain in place, multiple sailmakers and spar builders, all working in within a ruleset to promote the class. The IP is shared, or even owned by the Class, not the builder.

- International Moth

- 505

- Fireball

- Contender

- OK

- Optimist

- A-Class

and of course the Finn. And we all know who is the most successful builder of contemporary Finns, don't we ;-)

 
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mihnea

Member
225
3
Toronto & SD
I had a quick chat today with someone about the rig size, and at 160lb wet I think I'd got for the 9 given the lack of +15 kts winds around here.

Here's why:

When I windsurf I'm on a 8.8m sail 60-70% of the time, in up to 12 kn. My next smaller sail is a 6.9m, which I use 20-30% of the time in 12-18 kn. And the 5.5m I use 10% (once/twice per season) in over 16 kn.

I usually end up sailing with the 8.8m sail from the sailing club where the dinghy is. Heavier people need to carry more sail in the same conditions - I know a 220lb guy that sails a 9.5m when I'm on my 6.9m, for example. The difference between us is about the same as my windsurf and the RS.

In my simplistic math I think I'd be ok with the 9m RS in Toronto. It should be fine up to about 16-18 kts, same as where I would have to switch to the 5m windsurf sail. More than 15 kn wind speed is rare in Toronto: http://en.windfinder.com/forecast/toronto_island.

I think that even with a 9 RS, planning will only be around 10 kts downwind and maybe 12-13 upwind, or about 2 knots higher than on the windsurf.

 

jwlbrace

Super Anarchist
1,245
1
A34 - due south
I think that even with a 9 RS, planning will only be around 10 kts downwind and maybe 12-13 upwind, or about 2 knots higher than on the windsurf.

I'm sure there'll be plenty of planning upwind in 12-13 knots, a boat like this is a good tactical racer. I'm not convinced there'd be much planing upwind though.

 
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Board skiff

Super Anarchist
1,606
672
I guess it's a necessary reality, but it seems a bit of a shame that many folk are getting excited about a boat they've never seen, simply because it will be (relatively) easily available.

 

FishAintBiting

Anarchist
549
0
I had a quick chat today with someone about the rig size, and at 160lb wet I think I'd got for the 9 given the lack of +15 kts winds around here.

Here's why:

When I windsurf I'm on a 8.8m sail 60-70% of the time, in up to 12 kn. My next smaller sail is a 6.9m, which I use 20-30% of the time in 12-18 kn. And the 5.5m I use 10% (once/twice per season) in over 16 kn.

I usually end up sailing with the 8.8m sail from the sailing club where the dinghy is. Heavier people need to carry more sail in the same conditions - I know a 220lb guy that sails a 9.5m when I'm on my 6.9m, for example. The difference between us is about the same as my windsurf and the RS.

In my simplistic math I think I'd be ok with the 9m RS in Toronto. It should be fine up to about 16-18 kts, same as where I would have to switch to the 5m windsurf sail. More than 15 kn wind speed is rare in Toronto: http://en.windfinder.com/forecast/toronto_island.

I think that even with a 9 RS, planning will only be around 10 kts downwind and maybe 12-13 upwind, or about 2 knots higher than on the windsurf.
I think this says it all for the RS and planing upwind


 

slip knot

Anarchist
952
0
Ontario
I think that even with a 9 RS, planning will only be around 10 kts downwind and maybe 12-13 upwind, or about 2 knots higher than on the windsurf.
I'm sure there'll be plenty of planning upwind in 12-13 knots, a boat like this is a good tactical racer. I'm not convinced there'd be much planing upwind though.
I agree. I personally have never seen a centerline hiker that can plane upwind.

Anyone know of one?

 

dogwatch

Super Anarchist
16,850
1,567
South Coast, UK
I guess it's a necessary reality, but it seems a bit of a shame that many folk are getting excited about a boat they've never seen, simply because it will be (relatively) easily available.
Seen it, sailed it, others locally are buying, maybe we'll have a fleet. Do I have your permission to be excited?
 

Board skiff

Super Anarchist
1,606
672
Yes of course, I hope you enjoy it - it looks a fun boat that can be enjoyed by the whole family. Out of interest have you seen/sailed a Zero? Did you pick the aero because it suits you better, or because others in the area did? Or some other reason?

Some US sentiment seems to be that it is the boat to get because it has a good distribution network. A good, pragmatic, reason but not one to get the heart racing. When you buy a sports car you don't just pick the one who's dealer is closest.

 

Norm

Anarchist
579
2
sosooomii,

don't mean to hijack the thread, can you tell us more about your rumour - trapeze or hiker ?

 




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