rs aero

European Bloke

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?

Do you mean the bits that will stop the mainsheet going out the back but let the water out?

I should think they'll largely stop the water coming in when you go to the back to mess about with the rudder after launching/recovering.

 

couchsurfer

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NA westcoast
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....no more kicking the back of cockpit to bail ---REVOLUTION!!!!

........................ a bright future indeed! :)

 
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Board skiff

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That's a top hinged bit of thin plastic that rests against a honeycomb grill when closed but flaps open if there is water on board to let it out.

 

Reht

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That's a top hinged bit of thin plastic that rests against a honeycomb grill when closed but flaps open if there is water on board to let it out.
I figured they were transom flaps but the honeycomb-pattern confused me... Fair enough.

 

European Bloke

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If you check your boat off the ramp at the right/wrong angle with no transom and get a load of water in it will be very unstable until it drains out. Those flaps will stop it and the honeycomb will stop stuff going up and make the flaps more resilient.

When you get the boat suck head to wind and blow backwards, especially in a big sea, it can fill up and then become very unstable. Often happens when recovering from a capsize. Those flaps will stop that being a problem.

 

duncan (the other one)

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really? You reckon there's enough volume in that cockpit for it to become an issue?

If its 'unstable' after a capsize, when the cockpit is full, then the design has bigger issues... and I don't believe it does.

 

European Bloke

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I didn't say it had water after the capsize. I said it could get water in after it started going backwards in big conditions before you got hold of the wand. At which point you're back to square one.

But fuck it, I'm sure you're all right and they're all wrong.

 
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BobBill

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SE Minnesota.
Euro Bloke...Ed and Duncan are not being argumentative, I kinda wondered the same thing...the water, one would think, as little as it might be is weight , and likely will push the hull lower...unstable, to me, is tippy, which seems illogical is all. Might be a misinterpretation and can be solved with experience...

Frankly, even though I am now an outrigger/proa fan, I think the boat is ingenious, as I implied earlier. I am waiting for someone to offer an app and velcro etc, to set phone in it to lead the way...boat fits the modern trending there...

 
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Reht

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I wonder how much really would get into the boat drifting slowly backwards after being recovered from a capsize, and how long it would really stick around once the boat isn't drifting backwards (if there's something I'm sure they got right on the cockpit design it would be quick to drain). I have no doubt the transom flaps will help and the honeycomb behind them will help their longevity, but how necessary they are remains to be seen. Wonder if they are stuck in there or if they can be removed (it seems that those gaps in the transom would be an ideal way of getting back in the boat post-capsize if they were clear)...

 

Chris 249

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Why bother with transom flaps when the floor is 4" above the keel?

Who cares if water gets in when you're faffing around the stern getting off the shore?
If you're winter sailing in the UK, Europe or parts of North America, you may definitely care - getting even a bit of cold water in the boat can make sailing less pleasant on light wind days when it's otherwise comparatively warm. We notice it even in Canberra in the winter.

 

Chris 249

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I was coaching the other day and at the end of the day watching everyone pull their boats out, I noted there was one boat built after the 70's. The rest were before. Lasers Finns, Etchells... There are vast improvements that can be made to each of these, so maybe its time.
Looking at it from another angle - if almost everyone you saw was sailing designs made in the '70s, maybe it indicates that those boats still work very, very well?

The Aero does look very nice, though.

 

Norm

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i like it, however to me the Dacron sail gives the impression the rigs underdone compared say a d one or rooster rig, even compared to rs 100.

 

Board skiff

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Is that a newer version than the one at the show - the kicker seems to be led to a single swivel near the daggerboard rather than split out to the sides. I think that is better as it looks like it would be easier to pull on from there. Just a couple of observations a. There is still hardly any photos or video of it going upwind (about half a second in that video) b. does the way the blocks are tied on near the mast base mean that when towing/roof racking those pullies will bounce up and down on the deck and chip away at the gelcoat? I appreciate that mean like an anal question, but it's these real world things that matter.

 
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