Rudder Mystery.. what boat??

Somebody Else

a person of little consequence
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Honestly, who actually has two tape measures in one place at one time.. must be nice.
Well... "in one place at one time" is sort of a stretch, but I have enough tape measures around the house that it's just plain silly.

It's how I compensate for the CRS of old age. I'm the same way with scissors and Opinel N°08 knives -- some in every room. Trauma shears are a favorite -- they even cut Kevlar, Dynema, etc. Let's see... several wooden folding pocket rules, 6"/150mm Starrett engineer's scales, laser range finders, vernier, dial, and digital calipers, dial indicators, full set of gage blocks, 1-2-3 blocks, micrometers... you get the picture.

I have a toolmaker's chest that pretty much has nothing but measuring instruments. When I die my nephews are going to go, "What the fuck?!?"
 

sailor-cfn

Member
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That most definitely looks like a Rudder Craft, which used to be sold under the name Ida Sailor. They make them semi-custom, for many different boat models: when I bought one for an O'Day 222, I needed to take various measurements related to pintel spacing.

The rudder was much better built than the OEM one, and improved boat handling significantly.
 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
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Eastern NC
Rudder Craft Kick-Up Rudder, they're popular with Catalina 22s

I never heard of Rudder Craft, but there is a company named something like "Ideal Rudder" that used to sell aftermarket rudders like this. No way to tell what kind of boat it was bought for.

Unfortunately the maker of these rudders had no idea about the amount of torque transmitted thru the rudder head, they tended to break just below the tiller connection. But some people think it looks really cool, and that's important.
 

sailor-cfn

Member
248
76
I never heard of Rudder Craft, but there is a company named something like "Ideal Rudder" that used to sell aftermarket rudders like this. No way to tell what kind of boat it was bought for.

Unfortunately the maker of these rudders had no idea about the amount of torque transmitted thru the rudder head, they tended to break just below the tiller connection. But some people think it looks really cool, and that's important.
I think it was "Ida Sailor", but we're definitely talking about the same thing.

Sample size of 1, of course, but I used mine for many years in a high(ish) wind area and it never broke nor showed any signs of deformation.

For the O'Day 222, at least, it was a significant improvement on the OEM rudder: it sail significantly better. Probably due to the higher aspect ratio, deeper draft, and maybe a bit more area.
 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
44,287
9,614
Eastern NC
I think it was "Ida Sailor", but we're definitely talking about the same thing.

Sample size of 1, of course, but I used mine for many years in a high(ish) wind area and it never broke nor showed any signs of deformation.

For the O'Day 222, at least, it was a significant improvement on the OEM rudder: it sail significantly better. Probably due to the higher aspect ratio, deeper draft, and maybe a bit more area.
Yes, sorry, your earlier post didn't show in my browser until just now.
Ida Sailor is correct.
Their foil shape is great. It sounds like they finally put a big enough rudder post. I've seen some on Highlanders and non-raced Lightnings as well as Cat22s and similar trailer-sailers; about half had been obviously overtorqued and near failure or busted. Nice thing is that they seem to fail non-catastrophically (obviously it -could- on right day). They're also kinda heavy.

The whole "looks like a rudder post" thing eludes me. A kick-up rudder with traditional cheeks is not difficult to make and it's easy to make it plenty strong, and can be shaped to different aesthetics as you like.
 

Gouvernail

Lottsa people don’t know I’m famous
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Austin Texas
Honestly, who actually has two tape measures in one place at one time.. must be nice.
It all has to do with storage and a staff that loves tools. Our newest full time guy has been working on boats for thirty years and has been here for almost 18. Some of my occasional help has been doing so for 40 years.
Every tool here is pretty much stored in the same place that sort of tool has been stored for 30 years.
Anybody who has ever worked here can walk in snd find whatever he needs because he used to store it there himself.
 




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