Rudder Repair

Blue Crab

benthivore
16,220
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Outer Banks
I've got a spot that has likely let water in. I'm not going to fix things til I have to.

Q: should I drill a hole to let the water, if any, out? It will still be wet inside. Thoughts?

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
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Canada
I'd say 2/3 - 3/4 of all sailboat foam core rudders are wet on the inside. Just a WAG

I think "soggy" is better than "saturated" so I would drill and let excess water out and then seal the hole.

 

Crash

Super Anarchist
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I’d guess Zonk is being conservative with his guess, B)  but his advice is spot on!

 

allweather

Member
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baltic
3/4 of all sailboat foam core rudders are wet on the inside
How would I be able to tell that though? Asking since I have my rudder off right now and fighting to get the barrier coat off before fixing some minor osmosis bubbles.
And would like to know if there is more to it while I am doing the work anyway...

 

MiddayGun

Super Anarchist
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442
Yorkshire
How would I be able to tell that though? Asking since I have my rudder off right now and fighting to get the barrier coat off before fixing some minor osmosis bubbles.
And would like to know if there is more to it while I am doing the work anyway...
Drill a hole in the bottom & see if any water comes out. 

 

Bristol-Cruiser

Super Anarchist
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Great Lakes
I'd say 2/3 - 3/4 of all sailboat foam core rudders are wet on the inside. Just a WAG

I think "soggy" is better than "saturated" so I would drill and let excess water out and then seal the hole.
The surveyor for my last purchase said that virtually all such rudders are wet. I rebuilt my Niagara 35 rudder a number of years ago because I had rusty water oozing out at the top every winter. Turns out the rudder was built with a stainless shaft but carbon steel web (for strength?) inside. Had the web replaced with stainless and filled the core with thickened epoxy. New 5200 around the gap between shaft and glass. Seemed to work pretty well.

 

DDW

Super Anarchist
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I'd say 2/3 - 3/4 100% of all sailboat foam core rudders with a SS post are wet on the inside or will be. Just a WAG
FIFY. A SS post penetrating the envelope will eventually let water in no matter what you do. With a carbon post and good construction you have a pretty good chance of keeping it out. Imagine boring a 3" hole in the bottom of the boat, sticking a SS tube in the hole, and sealing around it with something. Now head offshore, giving the tube some firm twists and yanks every minute or so. 

You can tell the rudder is wet with a moisture meter (unless it is carbon skinned). I've walked through boatyards doing this and it is a rare exception that isn't wet. 

 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
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worldwide
Every two or so years , when you drop your rudder for inspection , bearing maintenance , it’s important to re caulk the rudder stock to blade joint 

5200… Sika …

these keeps water out of the blade 

60CDED7F-5B5B-4A60-A2BA-4DE4E0B9549E.jpeg

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
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Canada
That's a good idea. Sika or other is flexible which MAY seal the joint better than just glass/resin

 

DDW

Super Anarchist
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Actually, though this has been the subject of a cover up for years, water draining from rudders in the cause of ocean level rise, not global warming as some would have you think. 

 




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