Running Tide and Kialoa III A2N

Reference

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Always interesting to see how IOR boats do in the in ORC rating.

https://data.orc.org/public/WPub.dll/CC/0341000186K

image.jpeg

 

Foxtrot Corpen

Super Anarchist
Caught a glimpse of Running Tide at New England Boatworks, Portsmouth, RI this past weekend.  Couldn't pass up getting a couple pix of this awesome boat!  Looks like a brand new boat... built in 1969.

...FC

Running Tide 1.JPG

Running Tide 2.JPG

Running Tide 3.JPG

 
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Left Shift

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The original owner, Jakob Isbrandtsen, had his own shipping company and did all right for himself.  Had a cute daughter too.  Both were instrumental in setting up the South Street Seaport when they were just getting it going, IIRC.  

But the boat, as gorgeous as it was and still is, never really set the world on fire back then.  

 

Golfinaspen

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The boat has a new carbon mast (+10ft.), new sails, electric winches, AC, bow thruster, new electronics, etc. Nothing spared.

My dear late friend Ray Brown was the navigator for many years. He was a heart surgeon and set up clinic onboard the boat for the wounded worriers of the fleet after ocean races. 

Understand that last Friday as the delivery crew was departing NEBW the new engine (Nanni) failed (crenkshaft) and has delayed the trip to Annapolis by about a week. The boat is scheduled to compete in the Annapolis - Newport race on 6/5.

 

SloopJonB

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The original owner, Jakob Isbrandtsen, had his own shipping company and did all right for himself.  Had a cute daughter too.  Both were instrumental in setting up the South Street Seaport when they were just getting it going, IIRC.  

But the boat, as gorgeous as it was and still is, never really set the world on fire back then.  
How did it get so famous?

 

Left Shift

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How did it get so famous?
Turns out my memory is based on its LIS performance - mostly light air - and is wrong.  In the SORC and offshore Running Tide with it's beating and reaching in breeze was quite successful.

It was also one of the true new breed of gold-platers.  The old CCA 70' yawls like Windigo were well past their prime.  Plus new money, like Tom Watson, Turner and Isbrandtsen were coming into the racing scene at a high level with fat wallets.

Plus Jakob's daughter was cute.  

 

Cruisin Loser

Super Anarchist
Turns out my memory is based on its LIS performance - mostly light air - and is wrong.  In the SORC and offshore Running Tide with it's beating and reaching in breeze was quite successful.

It was also one of the true new breed of gold-platers.  The old CCA 70' yawls like Windigo were well past their prime.  Plus new money, like Tom Watson, Turner and Isbrandtsen were coming into the racing scene at a high level with fat wallets.

Plus Jakob's daughter was cute.  
Isbrandtsen was hardly "new money". I raced on his previous boat, S&S 66' yawl "Good News"

Hans was nice kid. Almost 50 years has passed....

 

SloopJonB

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quod umbra said:
Was a story back in 1972 maybe about Tide breaking her rod headstay during a Bermuda campaign. It was like one of the first of its kind IIRC. 

Jakob Isbrandtsen gets on the horn to president of US Steel and gets a new one built ASAP. Headstay makes its way down to the shipping department and the the boys are scratching their heads about how to ship the dang thing. Shipping foreman is consulted and he tells them, "Cut it into 10 foot sections and ship it as per normal."
My first awareness of the forces and dangers aboard those huge boats was a story about Tide 50 years ago.

A block blew up - running back maybe? Anyway, the loose line swept a coffee grinder off the deck.

Until I read about that I had no conception of the kind of forces involved on boats that size. I had never been on anything where you couldn't just grab a loose line.

 
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