Rushour on its roof.

LB 15

Cunt
This afternoon at Wags at RQYS. All crew safe and well. Bad luck for Drew and the team.

image.png

 
overlay said:
Superb example of why inshore multihulls shouldn't sail offshore.

The closer they stay to outside assistance  the better the outcome.

Yet the custodians of the  OMR encourages this style of boat.

Clowns?.
Do us a favour , give yourself a fuckin uppercut .

 
overlay said:
Superb example of why inshore multihulls shouldn't sail offshore.

The closer they stay to outside assistance  the better the outcome.

Yet the custodians of the  OMR encourages this style of boat.

Clowns?.
That photo looks way safer than the keels falling off monos, at least the crew have something to hold onto as opposed to boat and crew heading straight for the bottom, I do know how fast a mono sinks I was on one that went under in under a minute a couple of years ago, inshore though so I was able to stand on top of it, maybe OMR should consider that

 

teamvmg

Super Anarchist
1,972
104
overlay said:
Superb example of why inshore multihulls shouldn't sail offshore.

The closer they stay to outside assistance  the better the outcome.

Yet the custodians of the  OMR encourages this style of boat.

Clowns?.
Offshore? Its about 4 meters deep and some guy was posting photos that he took from the shore

 

LionIsland

Member
371
94
Pittwater
Bummer, but maybe not too much damage to mast head and not too much water ingress and good all well of course. 

Always interested in how the rerighting was managed and lessons learnt. Especially on a bigger boat such as this. And in shallow water. 

I still wonder if a small aero capsule (maybe the size of those Hobie mast head ones) with a gas cartridge inflated bag and inclination switch set at say 100* would be feasible and inexpensive insurance against inversion. Should stop the mast head digging in, hopefully keep most water out of the hull and motor and make reeighting easier. A con is the boat would blow away downhill faster. Maybe carefully deploy the anchor if that’s an issue. 

My theory is that on average Murphy gets his way once every 1000 hours of Boat’n. The little fucker. Some people more or less than others. 

So if you do lots of Boat’n it (unspecified stuff up) will happen from time to time, if you don’t do much Boat’n then you can probably say “Hey, I never have fuck ups because I’m shit hot at boat’n“ or if you don’t own a boat you can just slink away from the steaming pile of Murphy pooh and leave it up to the owner to take the rap.  

SB. 




 

newbiesporty

Member
341
6
overlay said:
Superb example of why inshore multihulls shouldn't sail offshore.

The closer they stay to outside assistance  the better the outcome.

Yet the custodians of the  OMR encourages this style of boat.

Clowns?.
You are having a go right?

That's not actually a serious post....

 

PIL66 - XL2

Super Anarchist
2,734
820
Stralya
overlay said:
Seeing we are posting Wednesday Arvo pics. Heres one from a little  further south several weeks back.

  

Gotta love the shallow water.
This boat is upright and back at it as well.... Damaged but not badly

Hope Drew sorts Rushour out quickly... great boat

 

bushsailor

Anarchist
693
193
QLD Australia
Brief report for the benefit of others.

forecast was for 20kn se wind.

We set the boat up with one reef and self tacking heady.

THIS CONFIGURATION IS VERY MANAGEABLE IN 20KN.

We started sailing to windward with the intention of building speed then bearing away to go downwind.

Main traveller was fully down and a crew member was holding the main sheet.

Speed built very quickly as we got hit by a big gust (40 kn) hull started to come up, main was completely dumped but hull kept climbing.

I (helm) turned up to feather the sails but response was slow because all drive was coming from the heady and the bows were pressed.

Boat capsized sideways.

Whole thing took maybe 5 seconds.

  • Mistakes: Bloody B&G wind instruments were not working so no appreciation of building breeze. (Rushour commonly does 20kn on a shy reach so 30kn of wind across the boat seems normal.)
  • We never normally hold the jib sheet. (obviously a mistake)
  • We were rushed with some inexperienced crew and I  never allocated roles.
  • I was complacent. I  never even come close to even flying the hull high on the new Rushour.
  • The gust of wind combined with boat speed gave approx 55 kn over the deck which was obviously enough to capsize a 7 ton boat.
  • The wing mast may have contributed to the capsize.


lucky we were only in 4 m of water and Rushour has a very strong wing mast so we were able to attach ropes to the high hull and tow her around so the bows were pointing into the wind and towed her over.

The bottom hull was flooded and that helped to right the boat.

You need a very big tow boat to pull a big cat over. We used a commercial cat Cat of Nine Tails to pull her up.

We had her upright about 2 to 3 hours after capsize.

I would not want to go through that in the open ocean.

A huge thank you to all the people who rallied around and helped right, retrieve, clean  the boat, and for all the messages. 

It makes you realise how good it is to belong to a strong sailing community.

 

MR.CLEAN

Moderator
46,276
4,424
Not here
I still wonder if a small aero capsule (maybe the size of those Hobie mast head ones) with a gas cartridge inflated bag and inclination switch set at say 100* would be feasible and inexpensive insurance against inversion. Should stop the mast head digging in, hopefully keep most water out of the hull and motor and make reeighting easier. A con is the boat would blow away downhill faster. Maybe carefully deploy the anchor if that’s an issue. 
This new boat has exactly that system.  Unfortunately when the mast came down last month, it didn't work because the angle sensor is in the boat, not the rig!

http://dnaperformancesailing.com/our-boats/dna-tf10-foiling-trimaran/

 

WoobaGooba

Anarchist
636
2
New England
That photo looks way safer than the keels falling off monos, at least the crew have something to hold onto as opposed to boat and crew heading straight for the bottom, I do know how fast a mono sinks I was on one that went under in under a minute a couple of years ago, inshore though so I was able to stand on top of it, maybe OMR should consider that
Do tell more.

 
G

Guest

Guest
What a joke, a crewed boat falling over in 20kts. That folks is why cruising cats are usually fat slugs. As for the 40kt "gust", my experience indicates that 20kts (which is fresh) and gusty does not include 40kts. That would be a front or a squall coming through.

I call bullshit on the excuses.

 
Last edited:
Gutterback, no way is that boat going over in 20kts and as for 40kt gusts they are not as rare as you might think, I have seen a beachcat blown over on the water and then flipped completely over mast end down so I'm talking the hulls 9metres in the air, I've sailed in 30kt gusts safely, I've also been on the water on a fairly benign day and been hit by a little whirly whirly that was sucking water it totally smashed us over, while all the other boats just sat and watched. As for the mono a couple of years ago when I was setting up for a distance race to be held the next day I was asked to crew on a mono about 25ft long they said I could wear my normal clothes drink beer etc so I agreed, well the skipper turned the wrong way under spin, I let the spin sheet go but he kept rounding up in the gust until the gunnel went under, then I was pinned in place until the boat filled, after that the fun started. I learned that on a cat when you put a hull under your having fun but on a mono when you put a hull under your committed.

 

Kenny Dumas

Super Anarchist
1,651
12
Oregon
Thanks for the writeup.  What's the relative size of the self tacking jib vs single reef main?  I guess the protocol on holding sheets should be dependent on that?

 

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