S2 7.9 - Exploding Daggerboard!

DarthSailor

Super Anarchist
1,314
345
As I said I recognized RCYC too late after my post, edited to correct the post. Last time I was there someone hatching a plan for golf balls made out of pill gel and fish food. The thought was the balls could be hit into a body of water, dissolve and attract fish. I am pretty sure they had a press to make the balls but that was as far as it got to my knowledge, we might have been drunk as well.

 

AJ Oliver

Super Anarchist
12,894
1,806
Sandusky Sailing Club
The 7.9 class assoc page has a template for the measurements of the board . . 

might as well go for class legal 

APPENDIX  B: S2  7.9  Class  Association  Rules DAGGERBOARD AND RUDDER SPECIFICATIONS B1.  DAGGERBOARD PLAN 19 9-2-2021

And furthermore . . around here we can get indoor heated winter storage for around $ 650. 

Why would you not do that ???? 

 
Last edited by a moderator:
random. said:
What local rules allow lifting the board?


The boat has been sailing with a lifting dagger board since it's inception.   It is explicitly allowed in class racing, and there is no rule explicitly states you can't lift it in handicap racing.  That is the way it has been rated in every handicap system.  It is no different than Tartans with centerboards, or any other boat that has a feature like that:  the handicap accounts for it.  This is not a lifting keel designed to only lift for transport.  It is a lifting key designed to be raced up or down.

This question has been asked and answered dozens of times, and most always raised by people who hear about and suddenly scream "that's not fair"  and want to decide that THAT'S why they got beat on the race course.  The fact remains, arbitrarily applying a non-existent rule to prevent lifting the keel would be a random penalization to a boat that's already been rated with the ability to lift it.  It's just stupid.

If you weren't such a shit-stirring twat, you could have done a search and found that out yourself without the obvious accusations.
The boat was designed to MORC.  MORC has/had a stability requirement that is performed with the boards up.  The 7.9 passed the test.  On a side note the Kiwi35 failed; but that's a long story.  The boat is more stable with the board locked down and there have been regattas that have required the board be locked down on a case by case basis.

 

DougH

Member
134
44
From the S2 7.9 manufacturer: "The 7.9 is self righting even with the keel fully retracted. There is ballast in the bilge...  One of the reasons that the (keel) lifting plate is such a massive structure is to keep the centerboard (sic) captive, should the boat roll completely over. This happened once on the West Coast shortly after the 7.9 was introduced. Several boats were lost in this storm. A 7.9 pitch-poled, and those on board heard the centerboard slam from full down to full up, and back down again. This same boat was on display at a boat show shortly after, and the sailors' testimonies were directly credited for the sale of a few 7.9's."

 

bridhb

Super Anarchist
3,769
1,115
Jax, FL
The boat was designed to MORC.  MORC has/had a stability requirement that is performed with the boards up.  The 7.9 passed the test.  On a side note the Kiwi35 failed; but that's a long story.  The boat is more stable with the board locked down and there have been regattas that have required the board be locked down on a case by case basis.
Did they come with a way to pin the board down or is that something that has to be added?

 
AFAIK The boat was in Annapolis for a while. Then it was dry sailed in the Houston area. We purchased it in July of 2020. It went straight into our local boat shop and got bottom paint slapped on it. I'm now thinking that because the shop couldn't lift the boat up enough to drop the board all the way down, it may have had some cracks up high (likely caused by freezing, although the board never swelled enough to hinder the up and down through the slot). And like Sail4beer says above, those cracks precipitated the failure. End of story.

Thanks for the input. Don't you fret none. I'm going to keep y'all updated on the rebuild. 

 

dyslexic dog

Super Anarchist
3,892
343
Michigan
I always kept my keel retracted at the dock and flossed the bottom instead of sending a diver down. Keeps the centerboard cleaner too. 

 

BobBill

Super Anarchist
4,611
101
SE Minnesota.
Read through this thread, 

We are human and screw up lots more than we admit...at least the OP is not a killer...and should check stuff when odd mess happen...

Being a sailor, and being that slow should have flagged the OP, but I procrastinate too... 

To me, fix per specs, if specific, is the real problem...what happened teaches...so let us know...

 

LEE73

New member
6
4
US
I had a repair done on my board in 99, when a large crack appeared. Diver alerted me.

Looking at this brake closely I believe there was a repair done before and it gave way.

Fiberglass doesn't break that straight.

 

ScaldedDawg

New member
1
0
Nashvegas
below posted yesterday on S2 class site. Might be worth a call if you want to replace your keel 

My current boat (hull#534 - Chili Pepper) was t-boned 2 weeks ago and totaled with a huge hole in the port side.
Chuck Begley 832-563-0421 

 

AJ Oliver

Super Anarchist
12,894
1,806
Sandusky Sailing Club
The boat is more stable with the board locked down and there have been regattas that have required the board be locked down on a case by case basis.
Yeah, and pretty sure that Charleston area PHRF had or has a rule that boards/keels cannot be lifted if they weigh more than 10% of the boat's weight. 

May have been done to get at the 7.9's 

 

Movable Ballast

Anarchist
6,201
249
San Diego
If that notch is the leading edge of the daggarboard, my guess is that you hit something solid at speed *hard*… like a submerged cargo container edge, and the blunt force impact sheared the outer covering off along that line of fracture which seems to originate at the notch, and peeled it down and off like a banana peel as the boat rode over the obstacle.
Agreed. That "notch" looks like an impact mark and the rest is just a result of that. I would also check the trailing edge of the keel box for damage... 

 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
44,256
9,609
Eastern NC
Yeah, and pretty sure that Charleston area PHRF had or has a rule that boards/keels cannot be lifted if they weigh more than 10% of the boat's weight. 

May have been done to get at the 7.9's 
Rules like that are often flung about but not actually to be found in the rule book. Nor IMHO are they enforceable, unless carefully written. When I raced a Santana 23D, a couple of different PHRF committees gave me shit about the daggerboard, but it turned out that either the "rule" they were trying to quote was entirely absent, or did not say what they thought it said.

FB- Doug

 

MaxHeadroom

Super Anarchist
Yeah, and pretty sure that Charleston area PHRF had or has a rule that boards/keels cannot be lifted if they weigh more than 10% of the boat's weight. 

May have been done to get at the 7.9's 
Lake Michigan PHRF also requires boards to be in the down position while racing.

Wayzata Yacht Club has a fleet of ~8 racing one design. We also have milfoil, which requires running the board to dump weeds, even on the upwind. Downwind in 20+ with the board up can be exciting. As others have mentioned, we have broached with the board up, and the internal ballast  does it's job and brings the boat back up once the kite is attended to....

 

dyslexic dog

Super Anarchist
3,892
343
Michigan
Honestly true confessions . . . 

I used to take pride in being able to winch the board up more easily than my younger crew. 

Not any more . .  father time caught up with me. 

Still really enjoy the boat, but do not race it much. Crew for others sometimes. 
I ended up with rotator cup surgery. Yep

 

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