Sailing around the world in a San Juan 24

buys737

New member
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Have you ever wondered (hypothetically) just how far you could go if you set sail one day and headed out over the horizon in a Craiglist special 4ksb with almost no preparation? Well...now you dont have to because three weeks ago this Russian immigrant, Rimas Meleshyus, left Oak Harbor, Washington in an old San Juan 24 he bought for $500 the month before. Where is he headed? Around the world...via Cape Horn. He has no autopilot or self steering, no communications equipment other than a handheld VHF. He has two ancient handheld gps units, 85 gallons of water and a boatload of food. Despite everyone telling him this was probably a bad idea, he left determined to follow his dream. This isn't the first time he's tried this kind of thing. A couple he spent 34 days crossing the Gulf of Alaska, also in a SJ24. He ended up shipwrecked on an island near Kodiak for 9 days before he was rescued by the Coast Guard. I gave him a Spot tracker and a bunch of batteries for it because I figured this could be an interesting show. He is currently a few hundred miles off the coast of Northern California. His progress has not been particularily good. 25 to 50 miles a day...but not always in the right direction. Right now he seems like maybe he's changed his mind and is headed for Hawaii. Anyway, I've attached a link to his Spot tracker if anyone's interested. He seems like a really nice guy with a huge dream and a lot of determination. I wish him well, but he has a lot of challenges ahead of him that Im afraid he's not prepared for.

Here's a link to an article in the local paper. There is also quite a bit of info on the guy if you google him.

http://www.whidbeynewstimes.com/news/213584831.html?mobile=true

And here is a link to the tracker.

http://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0peJuCrfr2oqehW0RAegJdeJsCaHryH5q

 

estarzinger

Super Anarchist
7,479
877
Just so you know . . . . an American couple (Dave and Jaja Martin) with 2 kids sailed round the world in a Cal24 (circa 1995 - we sailed across the Indian Ocean the same year they did).

They then had a third child, bought a 'big boat' - all of 33ft and sailed to Iceland and Norway.

That's just one case.

There are all sorts of people who have successfully made amazing trips in very very modest boats.

 

magic1637

New member
49
0
Have you ever wondered (hypothetically) just how far you could go if you set sail one day and headed out over the horizon in a Craiglist special 4ksb with almost no preparation? Well...now you dont have to because three weeks ago this Russian immigrant, Rimas Meleshyus, left Oak Harbor, Washington in an old San Juan 24 he bought for $500 the month before. Where is he headed? Around the world...via Cape Horn. He has no autopilot or self steering, no communications equipment other than a handheld VHF. He has two ancient handheld gps units, 85 gallons of water and a boatload of food. Despite everyone telling him this was probably a bad idea, he left determined to follow his dream. This isn't the first time he's tried this kind of thing. A couple he spent 34 days crossing the Gulf of Alaska, also in a SJ24. He ended up shipwrecked on an island near Kodiak for 9 days before he was rescued by the Coast Guard. I gave him a Spot tracker and a bunch of batteries for it because I figured this could be an interesting show. He is currently a few hundred miles off the coast of Northern California. His progress has not been particularily good. 25 to 50 miles a day...but not always in the right direction. Right now he seems like maybe he's changed his mind and is headed for Hawaii. Anyway, I've attached a link to his Spot tracker if anyone's interested. He seems like a really nice guy with a huge dream and a lot of determination. I wish him well, but he has a lot of challenges ahead of him that Im afraid he's not prepared for.

Here's a link to an article in the local paper. There is also quite a bit of info on the guy if you google him.

http://www.whidbeynewstimes.com/news/213584831.html?mobile=true

And here is a link to the tracker.

http://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0peJuCrfr2oqehW0RAegJdeJsCaHryH5q
The coast Guard should go ahead and send him a bill

 

kevlar

Super Anarchist
1,830
10
New Jersey
Have you ever wondered (hypothetically) just how far you could go if you set sail one day and headed out over the horizon in a Craiglist special 4ksb with almost no preparation? Well...now you dont have to because three weeks ago this Russian immigrant,
Stopped reading at 'Russian Immigrant'. Crazy Ruskies. :p

Not impossible though.. as proven by the Martins.

 
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nolatom

Super Anarchist
3,482
496
New Orleans
Sprouts? Cheese?

Can he write better than Reid? No, wait, I already know the answer to that.

First leg and Horn rounding has definitely Been done before, father and son doublehanded in a 25' Vertue, a tough little boat, also with sextant and few electronics:

http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f127/brief-review-my-old-man-and-the-sea-3599.html

And Matt Rutheford, solo in an Albin Vega, recently:

https://www.google.com/search?q=matt+rutherford+albin+vega&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=a5EWUvGzJKeU2wW2qoCICQ&ved=0CDoQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=726

Ah, what the hell. Good luck and Godspeed..

 
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Steam Flyer

Super Anarchist
40,087
7,610
Eastern NC
Have you ever wondered (hypothetically) just how far you could go if you set sail one day and headed out over the horizon in a Craiglist special 4ksb with almost no preparation? Well...now you dont have to because three weeks ago this Russian immigrant, Rimas Meleshyus, left Oak Harbor, Washington in an old San Juan 24 he bought for $500 the month before. Where is he headed? Around the world...via Cape Horn. He has no autopilot or self steering, no communications equipment other than a handheld VHF. He has two ancient handheld gps units, 85 gallons of water and a boatload of food. Despite everyone telling him this was probably a bad idea, he left determined to follow his dream. This isn't the first time he's tried this kind of thing. A couple he spent 34 days crossing the Gulf of Alaska, also in a SJ24. He ended up shipwrecked on an island near Kodiak for 9 days before he was rescued by the Coast Guard. ... ...

Well, a SJ-24 is not a good boat for this kind of thing, but it could be worse.

What he needs is not cool electronic doohickeys but to make sure the boat & rig & basic gear is sound. What does he have for ground tackle? Has the standing rigging been replaced at any time in the life of the boat or is it OEM? Have the hatches been given a bit of attention to make them strong & tight? What has he got for a bilge pump?

Most big dreams founder on the most mundane rocks. I know you meant well giving him a SPOT but that's far far down the list of stuff he needs.

FB- Doug

 
Some of you guys need to read about the history of what people have done in sailing from hundreds of years before this Russian guy started out. Seems a modern vacuum happens often when people think everyone needs a 40' boat with autohelm and GPS. What bullshit.

 
I hope he doesn't try to set a chute downwind in a breeze. The SJ24 is a real broach coach. But then that's probably the least of his potential problems. Good luck Ivan, you'll need it.

 

buys737

New member
19
0
Have you ever wondered (hypothetically) just how far you could go if you set sail one day and headed out over the horizon in a Craiglist special 4ksb with almost no preparation? Well...now you dont have to because three weeks ago this Russian immigrant, Rimas Meleshyus, left Oak Harbor, Washington in an old San Juan 24 he bought for $500 the month before. Where is he headed? Around the world...via Cape Horn. He has no autopilot or self steering, no communications equipment other than a handheld VHF. He has two ancient handheld gps units, 85 gallons of water and a boatload of food. Despite everyone telling him this was probably a bad idea, he left determined to follow his dream. This isn't the first time he's tried this kind of thing. A couple he spent 34 days crossing the Gulf of Alaska, also in a SJ24. He ended up shipwrecked on an island near Kodiak for 9 days before he was rescued by the Coast Guard. ... ...
Well, a SJ-24 is not a good boat for this kind of thing, but it could be worse.

What he needs is not cool electronic doohickeys but to make sure the boat & rig & basic gear is sound. What does he have for ground tackle? Has the standing rigging been replaced at any time in the life of the boat or is it OEM? Have the hatches been given a bit of attention to make them strong & tight? What has he got for a bilge pump?

Most big dreams founder on the most mundane rocks. I know you meant well giving him a SPOT but that's far far down the list of stuff he needs.

FB- Doug
Thanks Doug, I don't know much history on the boat but it is very stock and probably an OEM rig. As far as the tracker goes, I promised him that when he first got the boat. Rimas had no money and I figured people might be more apt to help him out and donate stuff he really needed to increase his chance of success if they would be able to follow along on his journey. Also when he needs to stop for repairs and supplies, it might give him more credit with people when they can see what he has already done (or just add to the evidence that he's a bit crazy!) Anyway, I think it helped because a lot of people donated a lot of safety gear, spares, and food. I just wish he could of waited longer and done a proper refit of the boat, but he was determined to leave this year. But honestly, the tracker isn't as much for Rimas as it is for me. I'm just really interested in seeing how he does.

 

CyberBOB

Anarchist
532
37
A San Juan 24 is not the best boat for this trip. It has a huge, very deep cockpit. When sailing, it is customary to plug the cockpit drains, as if it heals or squats, water starts pouring in.

10 years or so, a guy sailed his SJ24 from Oregon to Hawaii. He had a fair amount of experience, and had owned the boat for a number of years. He put in collision bulkheads, upgraded the rigging, etc. Took him a month, was knocked down frequently, and decided not to sail it home, as beating home for 6-8 weeks, after his experiences did not appeal to him. He ended up sailing it through the Panama Canal, and leaving it in the Caribbean.

The Cal 25 ended up getting significantly upgraded, both structurally and the rigging near the beginning of the trip.

The San Juan 24 is a great little boat, but isn't designed for serious offshore work.

I am not saying it is impossible, I wish him luck, I just think he could have chosen a better boat for this trip.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
65,118
10,608
Great Wet North
Just so you know . . . . an American couple (Dave and Jaja Martin) with 2 kids sailed round the world in a Cal24 (circa 1995 - we sailed across the Indian Ocean the same year they did).

They then had a third child, bought a 'big boat' - all of 33ft and sailed to Iceland and Norway.

That's just one case.

There are all sorts of people who have successfully made amazing trips in very very modest boats.
They completely rebuilt and repurposed that boat before they left - they didn't simply buy a bottom $ CL special and sail away.

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
8,887
4,801
Canada
I've owned a SJ24 too. Lovely boat but unless it's in the hands of a good sailor it might be a handful to self steer. No autopilot or windvane is his stupidest decision. It's a bit wet beating to windward - but it goes very nicely in light air. Hope it stays light around Cape Horn.

Some days I wish we lived in an benevolent dictatorship. Somebody would step in and say "sorry this is too stupid an idea". I'm all for sailing around the world in small boats (Webb Chiles for example), but it sure helps if you're a sailor first!

 

BalticBandit

Super Anarchist
11,114
1
Isn't that like buying a car with no wheels or tires, and think you could do the Indy 500? There are the stupid and then there is the unrealistic.
Its more like buying a junker 914 and then just driving onto the Brickyard figuring that if you start now you might get in 200 laps before next Memorial Day weekend

 

HILLY

HILLY
1,128
57
Lake Macquarie
24' boat.. fookin' luxury, probably got a spa..
Small boat for ocean voyaging start at 3'11", and went from Tangiers to Grand Caneria,
little boat...jpg

For going all the way 'round the marble you will need a bigger boat, this model at 12' is all you really NEED, everything else is a WANT...
acrohc australis.jpg

Me personally, something like the Maltese Falcon would be fine.
maltese falcon interior.jpg



Link to crazy bastards in small boats, my hats' off to all of them, the list doesn't include
Evgeny Gvozdev, he is worth googling.
http://www.microcruising.com/famoussmallboats.htm
 

Steam Flyer

Super Anarchist
40,087
7,610
Eastern NC
Some of you guys need to read about the history of what people have done in sailing from hundreds of years before this Russian guy started out. Seems a modern vacuum happens often when people think everyone needs a 40' boat with autohelm and GPS. What bullshit.
I don't think people need a 40'boat with fancy stuff, but I do think crossing oceans... or even sailing around the edges exposed to weather... requires a boat that is sound in the basics. You know, rudders that don't break, masts that don't fall down, hatches that don't let the sea come pouring in, anchors that will hold the vessel in place... in the absence of one of these, or one of a large number of similar basic requirements... a relatively simple situation goes from benign to malignant.

A SJ-24 is not a good choice for a number of reasons, but a super-cheap beater SJ-24 that has no real gear and dubious maintenance for the past ? decades is really just playing Russian Roulette. You can get away with with it for a lot of clicks, enough that the skipper and/or the people watching might not even be aware that's what is going on.

FB- Doug

 
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