Sailing Cost's

Anyone know a way to purchase and maintain a 30 foot boat with a very limited budget?  It is not the cost of the boat so much that is the problem.  What is the problem for me at least, are the marina fees, registration fees, maintenance / upkeep, insurance, and hurricane worries. . Due to circumstance beyond my control I am unable to become a liveaboard

Based on everything I have researched, owning and maintaining a sailing vessel over 28 feet is exclusively for the Rich.  I am an older, simple man with a modest income with family responsibilities. I live two hours from the coast. I have lake sailing experience but none on blue water. Any thoughts, suggestions comments (good or bad) would be appreciated. 

 

El Borracho

Sam’s friend
6,239
2,327
Pacific Rim
Crypto? :)

Apparently you have done the sums, being realistic. A huge savings can be had by storage on a trailer. Common for 30 foot boats. Hopefully mast-up at a marina with a hoist. 

 

Great Red Shark

Super Anarchist
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544
Honolulu
Yeah,  boats cost money,  no two-ways about that.

If you go SIMPLE - like a modest trailerable it can be done on a modest budget but OWNING a sailboat isn't for everyone - insurance, maintenance, trailer maintenance, safety gear, etc. etc. - the hits just keep on coming, and when you own it,  you're on the hook - that is the price of a command.

I'll put it this way:   I stopped campaigning my modest 30 footer for a couple years and banked the balance.   Last year I used it to pay off my house.

Nobody smart ever said:  "I need to save money,  I know:  I'll race sailboats."

If you're on a tight budget either sail OPBs  (Other People's Boats - folks need good crew,  or a club or rental) or get a dinghy or other really SIMPLE small, light keelboat - complexity in the systems and mass are your wallet's enemy.

 
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AnotherSailor

Super Anarchist
1,270
402
SF Bay
I don't think worrying about hurricanes is too expensive unless it leads to health issues. 

Besides that, a lot of people underestimate the costs, yet you do not have to be wealthy. As others said, keep it simple and keeping it on a trailer will help a ton! I had a boat in the water for some time. It was great when going for a sail, but it added a lot of maintenance costs: hauling out to apply anti-fouling, the diver to clean the bottom, the occasional issue under water that required a haul out, the slip fees. A boat on a trailer takes some time to get in the water, but you save so much time on all the other shit. AND when that hurricane arrives, you are way ahead of the game. 

Partnerships, as some said, are great too. I have been in quite a few and never had an issue. Set up a contract and have clear expectations. 

Good luck! 

 

Rain Man

Super Anarchist
6,926
1,884
Wet coast.
Start by buying a boat that isn't a POS requiring lots of repairs and upgrades.  Pay particular attention to the sails and the auxiliary.  Anything that gets replaced there will be expensive.  Next is the moorage, join a yacht club - typically the moorage rates are 1/3 to 1/2 of commercial and you'll get the initiation fee back in your first few years of moorage savings.  Or get a boat that can be on a trailer.

You can get away with putting the boat on a mooring for a while but the caution is that access is harder than you think, and that means maintenance will be neglected, and the boat will eventually become a wreck.  Coasts all over the world are littered with these neglected dreams.

 

Chris in Santa Cruz CA

Super Anarchist
5,307
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earths surface
I don't think worrying about hurricanes is too expensive unless it leads to health issues. 

Besides that, a lot of people underestimate the costs, yet you do not have to be wealthy. As others said, keep it simple and keeping it on a trailer will help a ton! I had a boat in the water for some time. It was great when going for a sail, but it added a lot of maintenance costs: hauling out to apply anti-fouling, the diver to clean the bottom, the occasional issue under water that required a haul out, the slip fees. A boat on a trailer takes some time to get in the water, but you save so much time on all the other shit. AND when that hurricane arrives, you are way ahead of the game. 

Partnerships, as some said, are great too. I have been in quite a few and never had an issue. Set up a contract and have clear expectations. 

Good luck! 
I drank many hurricanes on bourbon st and I definitely had health issues. No slip fees as I was able to walk but the amount of money needed to find a woman with all her teeth to clean my bottom was like 10 atm max draws in the day which was not going to happen. The idea of a partnership was a non starter given the contemplated activity and lack of legal assistance to forge a contract. 

 

slap

Super Anarchist
Anyone know a way to purchase and maintain a 30 foot boat with a very limited budget?  It is not the cost of the boat so much that is the problem.  What is the problem for me at least, are the marina fees, registration fees, maintenance / upkeep, insurance, and hurricane worries. . Due to circumstance beyond my control I am unable to become a liveaboard

Based on everything I have researched, owning and maintaining a sailing vessel over 28 feet is exclusively for the Rich.  I am an older, simple man with a modest income with family responsibilities. I live two hours from the coast. I have lake sailing experience but none on blue water. Any thoughts, suggestions comments (good or bad) would be appreciated. 
Lots of people with modest incomes own 30ft+ sailboats.  Much of it is spending priorities.  How new are your cars?  How often do you eat out?   What do you do on vacations?  How much of the boat work can be done by you?

As far as buying and maintaining a 30 foot boat on a limited budget the more work you can do yourself the better.  The cost of a marina can be reduced by getting a mooring or finding someone who rents out a slip on a dock at their house.

If you live two hours from the coast and plan to stay there, sailing on a nearby lake on a small boat may be the best solution.  You may actually spend more time sailing or at least have a better (time sailing) / (time working on the boat + commuting) ratio.

 

dacapo

Super Anarchist
13,262
1,348
NY
I’m am not wealthy. I own a 30ft boat ( and a 24 ft boat and a 15 ft boat ....)

if I didn’t feel the need to buy a new sail each year costs have been kept to insurance, yacht club ( mooring and storage) and upkeep (paint, small repairs/upgrades). Well within the reach of most middle class humans. 

 

Surfer7

Member
218
57
Anyone know a way to purchase and maintain a 30 foot boat with a very limited budget?  It is not the cost of the boat so much that is the problem.  What is the problem for me at least, are the marina fees, registration fees, maintenance / upkeep, insurance, and hurricane worries. . Due to circumstance beyond my control I am unable to become a liveaboard

Based on everything I have researched, owning and maintaining a sailing vessel over 28 feet is exclusively for the Rich.  I am an older, simple man with a modest income with family responsibilities. I live two hours from the coast. I have lake sailing experience but none on blue water. Any thoughts, suggestions comments (good or bad) would be appreciated. 
Does it have to be 30'? Is coastal cruising on the blue water your plan or do you want to venture far out onto the Atlantic Ocean? Not sure how many true "trailerable" 30' sailboats there are. I can tell you that the 26' S2 7.9 is a true trailerable coastal cruiser sailboat that is as easy to launch on a boat ramp as a rowboat. Especially if you can leave it in the parking lot with the mast up. You will need a tow vehicle that can pull 6000 lbs (boat + trailer).

The other nice thing about a boat like this is you can trailer it home to protect from a hurricane or just do some repairs/maintenance. Also with the very shallow draft achievable with the lifting keel you go places other sailboats cannot.

Other inexpensive coastal cruiser "trailer sailers" include the Com-Pac 23 and the West Wight Potter 19. But the S2 7.9 is the most seaworthy of the three. None of the three will give you standing headroom or the amenities of a larger boat. But if costs are an issue and you want to sail...

 
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mundt

Anarchist
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321
=
Why 30 feet?  IMHO that's kind of a terrible target. If you just want to go out and have fun sailing get a dinghy or a beachcat or an easily trailerable mono.  A 30 footer on a dock is a very low bang for the buck vessel unless you have targeted a specific racing fleet, already have at least 5 crew lined up or have convinced yourself that you're going to cruise it somewhere, in which case 30 feet is not really ideal either.  Being on a dock is very overrated.  Get something small, fun and cheap, tow it wherever you feel like sailing and then sail the living shit out of it.  

 

leeava

New member
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Anyone know a way to purchase and maintain a 30 foot boat with a very limited budget?  It is not the cost of the boat so much that is the problem.  What is the problem for me at least, are the marina fees, registration fees, maintenance / upkeep, insurance, and hurricane worries. . Due to circumstance beyond my control I am unable to become a liveaboard

Based on everything I have researched, owning and maintaining a sailing vessel over 28 feet is exclusively for the Rich.  I am an older, simple man with a modest income with family responsibilities. I live two hours from the coast. I have lake sailing experience but none on blue water. Any thoughts, suggestions comments (good or bad) would be appreciated. 
Lets go backwards. What is your monthly budget?

 

Sail4beer

Super Anarchist
9,516
3,087
Toms River,NJ
Let’s go back even one step further. Who’s sock is this?

D02503F7-641D-4408-9E49-ADFF2CD84092.jpeg

 
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Santanasailor

Charter Member. Scow Mafia
1,270
675
North Louisiana
As a former S2 7.9 owner and also an owner of a Santana 20 I have a few points I would like to make

1.  If you have to ask, you can’t afford it.  You really can’t.  If you want to make the sacrifices, fine, go ahead but it really isn’t cheap.  Among the other things that our Santana needs, one that is not related to the HURRICANE DAMAGE is, she needs a new traveler car and of course the matching track.  I have not priced the track but the car is over $500.00.  A part that weights about a pound that you can hold in your hand.  Also, due to age she needs new cam cleats.  They run about $35.00 each and she only needs ten of them.  Yes some models can be rebuilt.  Building ten spring loaded cleats is about as much fun as unscrambling an egg.  Each cleat has two spring loaded cams.  

2.  The S2 is a wonderful boat and I miss her dearly.  We had a lot of fun sailing her and she was a good sailor, easily faster than her rating and able to horizon boats with far greater waterlines.  Getting her on the trailer was a great bonus.  

BUT

Finding a mast up marina where you can store her that way and you can trailer launch her from is not that easy.  We hunted and found two in all of the Ft Walton Beach /Destin area.  One was inexpensive, one required a membership at a yacht club.  both were nice places.  

But

Raising and lowering the keel is not for the faint of heart.  It is a job.  The rudder is heavy and if you don’t raise it before you pull it out of the water, you will damage it.  

I will say that with the swept back Spreaders, it is easier to raise and lower the mast than on the Santana.  The Santana’s rig has to be tuned every time the mast this raised.  

Hurricane damage.  Not a worry, well if you are a Vanderbilt or a Rockefeller but for us common folks, well, I am budgeting $5000,00 to rebuild a small hurricane damaged boat and am already over budget.  

If something like pictured below does not bother you, remember, this was caused by hurricane winds 200 air miles from the Gulf.  

So much for the gloom and doom

Sailing year round in the South

PRICELESS

9DB118F3-31FB-4E6B-A935-B68BC8068626.jpeg

7DD2CF65-9BE5-4F51-857C-BCA992DC6909.jpeg

 

bgytr

Super Anarchist
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492
Just a hint...

Every time there is an "s" at the end of a word, it doesn't mean an apostrophe is required.

 

Surfer7

Member
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57
2.  The S2 is a wonderful boat and I miss her dearly.  We had a lot of fun sailing her and she was a good sailor, easily faster than her rating and able to horizon boats with far greater waterlines.  Getting her on the trailer was a great bonus.  

BUT

Finding a mast up marina where you can store her that way and you can trailer launch her from is not that easy.  We hunted and found two in all of the Ft Walton Beach /Destin area.  One was inexpensive, one required a membership at a yacht club.  both were nice places.  

But

Raising and lowering the keel is not for the faint of heart.  It is a job.  The rudder is heavy and if you don’t raise it before you pull it out of the water, you will damage it.  

Hurricane damage.  Not a worry, well if you are a Vanderbilt or a Rockefeller
Agree with checking first if the boat is allowed to be stored on the trailer with mast up.

I currently have an S2 7.9. Raising and lowering the keel? Maybe you didn't have the 4:1 purchase modification. I'm no spring chicken, in my 60s, and raising the keel is not at all hard for me. A nice little workout for my old arms, but not a strain really. Lowering? Gravity makes this child's play: just pay the line out properly using the winch as a brake (of course do NOT let the board free-fall).

The heaviness of the rudder is only an issue when assembling the rudder to the pintles on the boat. Just raising the kick-up rudder is not at all hard for me. I have one of those ss 'hooks' that keeps the rudder in the up position when needed. No strain.

Hurricanes. With some advance warning can you not tow the boat to a safe place? Sturdy pole barn? Home next to your garage and stake hold down ropes to the ground? Or?

 

Santanasailor

Charter Member. Scow Mafia
1,270
675
North Louisiana
We had the boat on dry ground, safely tied down.  The hurricane was supposed to miss and we were at that point 500 miles away (having already damaged the mast step trying to get her moved away from a previous hurricane.) it is a long story, she was supposed to be picked up and the repair done, but the shop never picked her up and even though our S2 and her sister were securely tied down on high ground, the hurricane waves literally washed the ground away from both boats, destroying the club parking area and taking out both boats.  (As well as several others). 

I’m not sure what our keel lift purchase was but we are in our 70’s and it was a real workout that took some time and both of us to complete.  We had the hook to hold the rudder but getting it up high enough to hook usually required me to get down the swim ladder and pick it up.  If I had her still, I would rig a purchase system to lift the rudder.  

All that said, The little Santana is a fun little boat to sail, but the S2 is a boat that has so much special going for it, I really hate to have lost her.  Hopefully, we will have the Santana rebuilt this spring and get her back out on the water.  We already have some trips away from our home lake planned including taking her to Florida and to the mountain lakes of Arkansas.

 
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