Sailing log book

lokate

New member
24
7
New York
I do three books, I have a log book, a guest book and a useful information book. The log book I write maintenance and ship information that is needed to track what's been done when and all that - basically a ship maintenance log. The guest book is for guests to write in, pretty much open format - I've got some great sketches from like 6 year old's in there.... And the useful information book - that's used for trips, getting into places asking questions and writing down the answers (like where's a good restaurant, hardware store, etc. - my memory sucks). This last book is pocket sized and easy to carry about. I don't document enough about trips, that I need to change...

dj
 

Jud - s/v Sputnik

Super Anarchist
6,238
1,711
Canada
I don’t sell shit

And I don’t give a dam about your background
Au contraire, mon ami. It gives us a particular insight into one’s peculiar personality. El Borracho is an original.

Would you have guessed that I once used to be a professional lion tamer, and have willingly put my head into panthera leo’s enormous, sharp-toothed maw, so subdued and hypnotized by me was he. However, I left that one out of the log book (but it will get at least a paragraph in my forthcoming autobiography).
 
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Rite in the rain has a really nice medium size spiral book now, makes a great logbook. Used the yellow ones alot for radio logs etc before but never liked the bound book as much. The spiral one is pretty nice. If you ever get zapped DR plotting becomes a regular practice.
 

thinwater

Super Anarchist
1,044
133
Deale, MD
Gotta be the contrarian.

A total waste of time, except ...
  • Maintenance. Saves double work, keeps you honest.
  • International travel.
  • Navigation in some circumstances.
  • Commercial.
Otherwise, the records are no more actionable than keeping a log when you drive your car, and paper work that is not actionable is a waste.
 

kiwin

Member
364
235
Auckland
Gotta be the contrarian.

A total waste of time, except ...
  • Maintenance. Saves double work, keeps you honest.
  • International travel.
  • Navigation in some circumstances.
  • Commercial.
Otherwise, the records are no more actionable than keeping a log when you drive your car, and paper work that is not actionable is a waste.
Not a waste of time and my practices have saved my bacon a couple of times. The maintenance records are very useful obviously, but the logkeeping at sea - and I only do it on passage - has been very useful a number of times, including with the authorities a couple of times, but also for navigation and housework reasons. When on a watch system at sea and a little sleep deprived, especially in heavy weather, it's very useful to refer back. On a longer trip all the days start to blur together......
 
Agree with Kiwin. And isn’t the best part of a passage precisely when the days start to blur together? When life’s rhythm is about on watch off watch.

But I also think that a “logbook” in which each departing crew member has to record some aspect of their experiences, preferably in verse, can make for the most valuable lifelong memories.
 

DanJ

New member
10
1
Gotta be the contrarian.

A total waste of time, except ...
  • Maintenance. Saves double work, keeps you honest.
  • International travel.
  • Navigation in some circumstances.
  • Commercial.
Otherwise, the records are no more actionable than keeping a log when you drive your car, and paper work that is not actionable is a waste. But on the other hand, any attempts to introduce high-quality time management during hikes should always be discussed, because sometimes interesting ideas arise. I teach at school and when I searched for topics for time management essay https://papersowl.com/examples/time-management/ and found some ideas to create a compact and user-friendly log book, I hope logbooks will be standardized soon at the level of law.
I think not everyone agrees that this is a waste of time. In some cases, during long transitions, this helps a lot.
 
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py26129

Super Anarchist
2,854
193
Montreal
I created my own in Word and print a new pages whenever we run out. Aside from the "diary" of the trip, the book is a great source of useful info such as VHF channels for the locks, mechanical o fp for the boat and a wonderful record of people we met along the way
 

TheDragon

Super Anarchist
3,075
1,017
East central Illinois
I am impressed so many of you still keep a log book, but it seems pretty much irrelevant to me as a singlehander. No watches, no crew, just blogging as my record of my trip. If an authority asked, I would show them my track and blog on PredictWind, but so far nobody has asked.
 
I've just had to consult my present logbook to get my date of first arrival in Ecuador in 2019. I have no other record as I have a new pasport with a different number.
So with no logbook it would have been a stab in the dark to the nearest month but they want precision as that is the date your years roll over for your tourist visas. 90 days cumulative within your own 'personal' year. Currently chasing a 90 day extension.

That said I get about a week to a page.

log.jpg
 
Gotta be the contrarian.

A total waste of time, except ...
  • Maintenance. Saves double work, keeps you honest.
  • International travel.
  • Navigation in some circumstances.
  • Commercial.
Otherwise, the records are no more actionable than keeping a log when you drive your car, and paper work that is not actionable is a waste.
I feel sorry for your crew. You probably talley TP squares for pooping.


For cruising a paper log is like any other traveling momento, pretty nice to go back through and remember. And two months later for the non tech obsessed also nice to know what you did with whatever you already forgot.
 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,265
999
The Gorge
Agree with Kiwin. And isn’t the best part of a passage precisely when the days start to blur together? When life’s rhythm is about on watch off watch.

But I also think that a “logbook” in which each departing crew member has to record some aspect of their experiences, preferably in verse, can make for the most valuable lifelong memories.
Ah, but what about when they prefer an interpretive dance? I understand that there’s notation for that but I don’t grok it.
 

thinwater

Super Anarchist
1,044
133
Deale, MD
Being a contrarian is fun. And people always infer what is not said.
  • Long passages are obviously included in "international travel" and "navigation in some circumstances."
  • The "TP" comment is just weird. I have no idea what that meant or where it came from. We use lots.
We always kept a log for guests to write in and for maintenance records. Also section where me or anyone would write notes about the day. But not hours, fuel consumption, or weather details unless they were pertinent to the story. The story is what matters. It's organized into sections, easy to use. But I'm hardly obsessive about it. If it is not part of the fun, I don't want it. I had to keep records at work.

On my sport boat (F-24), not hardly. Maintenance records only. I don't "log" my climbing adventures either. Some do.
 




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