Sailor and dolphins rescue woman

SEC16518

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It's interesting a pack a wild dolphins can behave more civilized than a bunch of collegiate sailors....

 

Sail4beer

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https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/oct/17/experience-i-was-attacked-by-a-dolphin

224BB4F9-69C4-4BDB-BB9B-AF38FE4E9403.jpeg

 

Somebody Else

a person of little consequence
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I keep checking in on this thread every few days, looking for the naked girl photos.

Now I read this...

Saw this story in the LA Times. Apparently the girl does not want her name or likeness available to the public, at all.
Phooey!

 

shanghaisailor

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20 hours ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Had to read this a few times to NOT do anything other than believe I got what you were saying.

And a good example of this is a famous bottlenose dolphin named Fungie, who spend most of his long life in Dingle on the Irish west coast. He came to greet us when we sailed into Dingle Bay and the story then was that he would only greet new visitors and not the regular local boats. And he was not interested in boats leaving either. It looks like he became a bit more of a showman over the years, from all the tourist boats chasing him, and the swimmers too. He disappeared just over a year ago, and probably died of old age, after setting a Guinness record of about 40 years of age. And just like Elvis he is still being sighted every now and then.

One of the nicest of many stories about him is this one:

https://www.thejournal.ie/readme/swimming-with-fungi-5338499-Mar2021/

And a short video:


Love the tale of Fungi.

My favourite was a Jacques Cousteau (I think) video years and years ago when some of his divers were swimming with a whale. I seem to remember it was a Humpback. During one of the downstrokes with its pectoral flippers the whale was clearly going to hit, and probably injure a diver. The whale paused mid-stroke until its momentum carried it forward a few feet and continued the stroke therefore missing the diver.

No proof but it sure as hell looked like the whale consciously avoided hitting the diver

 

Sail4beer

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Love the tale of Fungi.

My favourite was a Jacques Cousteau (I think) video years and years ago when some of his divers were swimming with a whale. I seem to remember it was a Humpback. During one of the downstrokes with its pectoral flippers the whale was clearly going to hit, and probably injure a diver. The whale paused mid-stroke until its momentum carried it forward a few feet and continued the stroke therefore missing the diver.

No proof but it sure as hell looked like the whale consciously avoided hitting the diver
Watch a video of Orcas using their tails to stun and kill a variety of fish, rays and mammals and you get a feel for the immense power of a whale’s tail. Interestingly, there are no reported cases of an Orca killing a human being in the wild-different story for captive whales. They are inquisitive and playful around humans and like to show off in the wild. We are lucky.

 

fastyacht

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Love the tale of Fungi.

My favourite was a Jacques Cousteau (I think) video years and years ago when some of his divers were swimming with a whale. I seem to remember it was a Humpback. During one of the downstrokes with its pectoral flippers the whale was clearly going to hit, and probably injure a diver. The whale paused mid-stroke until its momentum carried it forward a few feet and continued the stroke therefore missing the diver.

No proof but it sure as hell looked like the whale consciously avoided hitting the diver
Imagine having 50 feet of kinesthetic sense?

 

JohnMB

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Watch a video of Orcas using their tails to stun and kill a variety of fish, rays and mammals and you get a feel for the immense power of a whale’s tail. Interestingly, there are no reported cases of an Orca killing a human being in the wild-different story for captive whales. They are inquisitive and playful around humans and like to show off in the wild. We are lucky.
Orcas are smart fish, in the wild there are no reports of them killing humans because the humans never survive to tell the tale. The captive orcas figure they have nothing to loose.

 

SloopJonB

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They aren't fish and they aren't whales - they are the largest porpoises. Probably why they are so smart.

There are lots of them around here and never been a story of them killing a person or attacking a boat or anything like that.

The stuff going on near Spain is unlike anything I've ever heard about them.

 

Fiji Bitter

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In the wild.
There are lots of them around here and never been a story of them killing a person or attacking a boat or anything like that.
You must have missed or forgotten about "Luna" then, on Vancouver Island. An (in)famous Orca in it's days, but not necessarily aggressive as such. I recently posted about him in the Mini-Transat thread.

On 10/3/2021 at 1:37 PM, Fiji Bitter said:

It's possibly just that, it could even be that they figured out they can play with you longer if they jam or break the rudder!

Nearly 20 years ago I was "circumnavigating" Vancouver Island (750nm, but much longer if you go into every inlet or fjord), and half-way down the desolate West coast there were constant warnings not to get anywhere near a cute young orca that had become separated from her pod. It just wanted to play, but when people were not allowed to get near him, he became a dangerous nuisance. The situation became very contentious when the indigenous Indians claimed it was the reincarnation of one of their beloved chiefs. Lots of intriguing stories and videos on "Luna", and this one is one of the nicer ones:



 

Omer

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What was the story of rescuing a small dog  which was fallen of a yacht during an ARC in the middle of Atlantic Ocean.

Poor thing was  swimming for hours before being spotted by an other yacht happened to be in the area. 

 

Sail4beer

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Didn’t hear that one, but I do remember being waayy offshore in the Gulf on Mexico of Key West when a golden retriever came swimming towards us. We couldn’t believe it! Pulled the dog aboard and gave it some water. We got back to shore to call the owners( had a collar and info tag) and found that the dog had fallen off their boat at night and had been missing for days off St. Petersburg, about 100 miles north. 

 
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Sail4beer

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Toms River,NJ
Forget his name, but that was his middle name for sure! He was halfway to the Dry Tortugas and heading west when we caught up with him in a powerboat. 

 
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