Sailors Powerboat

Expat Canuck

Anarchist
627
157
Salish Sea
all the sailors i know who bought a cruising power boat got old Grand Banks'
The problem with the GB is that they are so popular that you are looking at paying $80k for an early '80's fibreglass one (32' or 36'), and they only come with one engine, good for cruising at 7 or 8 knots.

We looked long and hard at them, but in the end went for something that was about 1/2 the price, 10 years newer, and goes twice as fast.  When you are used to traveling at 6 knots, 12 knots is a real luxury.

Just as with sailboats, there is no one powerboat that is right for everyone, even all ex-sailboat owners.  We went with a boat that is perfect for cruising in the PNW summer, when there is seldom enough wind to get you where you need to go on a tight cruising schedule.

 

hobot

Super Anarchist
Flemming 50

slide_58.jpg

 

Shu

Super Anarchist
1,717
95
Lot's of nice powerboats above.  One thing they share is the absolute rejection of the current trend to create all sorts of layered marshmallow shapes for the foredeck.  Nothing to hold onto, little to no nonskid, and a dearth of flat surfaces to walk on.  Completely ignores the situation where you need to go forward on a wet deck, and heaven forbid there is any kind of chop running when you do.  The attached example is not as egregious as some, and it has a hand rail, but those first few steps going forward from the cockpit would be sporty. 

Just to be clear, I would NOT want this boat.

main.jpg

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,431
3,054
The problem with the GB is that they are so popular that you are looking at paying $80k for an early '80's fibreglass one (32' or 36'), and they only come with one engine, good for cruising at 7 or 8 knots.
    I delivered a Grand Banks 36 from the VI to Ft Lauderdale and then a couple of years later delivered the same boat from New Jersey back down to the VI. That GB had twin Cummings and could really haul ass (for a GB that is). The speed available on that hull got us out of the beginnings of Hurricane Erin as we made safe harbor in Turtle Cove in T&C. If we had been dodging that bullet with a single engine GB 36, I don't think we would have made the safety of Turtle Cove.

 
The problem with the GB is that they are so popular that you are looking at paying $80k for an early '80's fibreglass one (32' or 36'), and they only come with one engine, good for cruising at 7 or 8 knots.

We looked long and hard at them, but in the end went for something that was about 1/2 the price, 10 years newer, and goes twice as fast.  When you are used to traveling at 6 knots, 12 knots is a real luxury.

Just as with sailboats, there is no one powerboat that is right for everyone, even all ex-sailboat owners.  We went with a boat that is perfect for cruising in the PNW summer, when there is seldom enough wind to get you where you need to go on a tight cruising schedule.
Out of curiosity, what boat did you get? 

As for Pianos.... Mark Patty built a Lightning (19'CB dinghy) using the west system, and covered it in Mahogany veneer.  It was gorgeous, people would say "How can you race such a beauty?", and his response was "I can sit it in the living room and drink coffee off it, or I can go sailing". 

 

Bull City

Bull City
6,905
2,539
North Carolina
Looks like a William Hand design to me. I like it other that the stupid tall PH.

How's this?

08023_0037-e1363364794402.jpg
Ensign is ostentatiously large, hull is nice, but it's a very expensive, ego-stroking run-about, and therefore aptly named.

The pilot house of the Bowler is tall because the owner is quite tall.

The Bowler cruises at 10 - 12 knots. What about Trumpa?

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Expat Canuck

Anarchist
627
157
Salish Sea
Out of curiosity, what boat did you get? 

As for Pianos.... Mark Patty built a Lightning (19'CB dinghy) using the west system, and covered it in Mahogany veneer.  It was gorgeous, people would say "How can you race such a beauty?", and his response was "I can sit it in the living room and drink coffee off it, or I can go sailing". 
At the risk of much ridicule, I'll admit to now owning a Bayliner 3288 with twin 135 hp diesels.  Makes for a great regatta support boat.  We've had the entire crew of the ILC 40 inside for a crab boil at WIRW a couple of times now.

 

Left Shift

Super Anarchist
10,387
3,182
Seattle
Lefty:

It really wasn't meant to be my take on a Lake Union Dream Boat. But I have been around the Dreamboats for so many years I think, now you mention it, that some of those influences have definitely crept into this design. Makes sense.
It's a very pretty boat.  We are both PNW folks who have watched the Dreamboats putter by for decades.  Nothing wrong with a little influence applied to a new project.  

 

axolotl

Super Anarchist
1,656
183
San Diego
A twin engine trawler of some sort, with major concessions made to seaworthiness.  The same length as your former sailboat, for example, a 36 footer should cruise @ 6kn.  That way it feels the same underway.

 
Top