Sailors Powerboat

these things are not real practical other than being pretty, and being good for low-speed cocktail cruising around the harbor.  thankfully, that's good enough

pretty much standard equipment in her home waters, harbor springs MI

View attachment 483480 View attachment 483481
There are good and bad things about jet drives. After owning one, in my personal use, the bad outweighed the good by a significant margin. But others might have positive experiences.

Anyone enjoy owning one for awhile?

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,864
2,003
Punta Gorda FL
The 32 was very popular too. Even my dad liked them. Were they designed by Hunt?
It was 31 and yes, but I'd call both powerboater's powerboats. Beating everyone to Nassau was impressive and made the company but it was a wet, brute force approach. Enough deadrise and enough power means you can dash across a nasty Gulfstream but it's inefficient for anything else.

Those boats are still restored by classic plastic buffs and are among few old boats that defy the "dime to the dollar" rule that says each dollar spent on an old boat increases resale value by a dime. It's closer to 90 cents on an old Bertram so you can go broke restoring them at a much slower rate.

 

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
12,928
2,600
It was 31 and yes, but I'd call both powerboater's powerboats. Beating everyone to Nassau was impressive and made the company but it was a wet, brute force approach. Enough deadrise and enough power means you can dash across a nasty Gulfstream but it's inefficient for anything else.

Those boats are still restored by classic plastic buffs and are among few old boats that defy the "dime to the dollar" rule that says each dollar spent on an old boat increases resale value by a dime. It's closer to 90 cents on an old Bertram so you can go broke restoring them at a much slower rate.
LAst summer I actually ended up next to a fully restored 31 on route 84 as I was driving through Danbury CT!

 

Russell Brown

Super Anarchist
1,759
1,437
Port Townsend WA
58 minutes ago, Matagi said:


What a cool boat! The detailing is kind of amazing. Hard to figure how it can be a budget production boat and be wood at the same time. I'd love to see their operation. Happy to hear talk about wood and sustainability and even happier to hear mainstream talk about wood being a really light way to build.

 

Sail4beer

Usual suspect
10,379
3,681
Toms River,NJ
I love plywood composite boats, they have so much strength, are wonderfully stiff and can look very impressive at a moderate cost. I finished a Norwalk Island Sharpie in that way and it was light and fast.

 
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nige

Super Anarchist
2 hours ago, Matagi said:


What a great looking boat.    I have a hard time believing they can build it for 150k (GBP) including engines and taxes and stay in business, but fingers crossed, its a great combination of the pros without many of the cons.  (I am not a wood fan but understand why its a good solution ;)

 

Matagi

Super Antichrist
Swallow Yachts have been around for a while, they are doing some fantastic sailboats, too, that's where they started. The Coast 250 is essentially a motorsailor, but in fact one of the best sailboats I can think of, great looking as well, in my view. 

Coast-250-cliff-crop-1.jpg


 
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IStream

Super Anarchist
10,927
3,104
I see a lot of volume for 25', which is difficult to do without looking chunky. It looks chunky, but not in a bad way (IMHO).

 

Autonomous

Turgid Member
4,354
1,528
PNW
The Whisper 300 is a breath of fresh air. Like!

On mine (Ha!) they'll delete some of the fancy bits. I don't need two dozen wine glasses or a park bench on the transom, etc. It will have an Alaskan bulkhead and sliding side windows though.

 

valcour

Member
378
91
I’d like to see a smaller, open version of that Whisper.  May 20-22 feet, single engine.   
 

Curious how they are getting what appears to be a compound curve in the plywood topsides with the tumblehome aft.  

 

steele

Super Anarchist
1,758
243
Land of the locks
I’d like to see a smaller, open version of that Whisper.  May 20-22 feet, single engine.   
 

Curious how they are getting what appears to be a compound curve in the plywood topsides with the tumblehome aft.  
It is surprising what you can do with good quaility plywood. This tubby little kayak is 10' x 2 /12'. The fordeck is concave just in front of the  cockpit side to side, and convex for and aft at the bow. Getting the rest of wood to bend to such a short wide shape wasn't easy, but it worked.  843129457_woodduckkayak020.jpeg

 




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