Sailors Powerboat

Snarley

Super Anarchist
3,324
124
US
Good-looking boats BUT...

I can't get over that wasted space in the reverse transom. As it is, the aft stowage is inefficient and difficult to use. If it were a plumb transom you would gain a ton flexible access stowage or increased deck space.
My take was at the time the Pearson 38 was designed everybody and their uncle had some cool looking transom so the Pearson needed some sort of not normal rear end.   Either that or they like big butts...

True_North_38_02 (2).png

 

Matagi

Super Antichrist
Yes ;). The hull is the same, the cabin top is more angled in the front. Anyway...
Ah, I like me a man with no time for subtleties. Great life-choice, makes it so much simpler.

Joking aside:

The Jakt 12 is, well, 12 metres long, the Loxo 32 is, you guessed right, 32 ft, so roughly 9,5 metres.

That's why the hulls MUST be very different. And I don't mean the length, I mean the ability to go into a speed mode that was usually only for planing hulls, without planing.

The Jakt 12 m does it so much better, if you compare the videos, look at the wakes, so much less in the Jakt under comparable circumstances. The main reason however is not the hull form but the lower weight of the Jakt, ca. 1,100 kg vs. 1,600 kg.




 

Veeger

Super Anarchist
The Jakt 12 looks impressive.  BUT,  It’s very light and needs to be light to get the performance objectives.   I just can’t imagine it in a chop or larger waves, more do I believe that most owners will have the discipline to keep it very lightweight.  Multihulls are the same way, theoretically very fast and efficient and for the disciplined racer, they are.  But once they get out to the cruising crowd, that advantage is typically all but squandered.  This will be the same way.  (Gotta have a dinghy, more range, generator and so it goes….)

 

nige

Super Anarchist
The Jakt 12 looks impressive.  BUT,  It’s very light and needs to be light to get the performance objectives.   I just can’t imagine it in a chop or larger waves, more do I believe that most owners will have the discipline to keep it very lightweight.  Multihulls are the same way, theoretically very fast and efficient and for the disciplined racer, they are.  But once they get out to the cruising crowd, that advantage is typically all but squandered.  This will be the same way.  (Gotta have a dinghy, more range, generator and so it goes….)
100%.  Its a very big boat to keep empty.  Cool for the right person though....

 

Monkey

Super Anarchist
11,078
2,712
It’s not really a plus, but it is for most sailors that also play with powerboats. We cancelled a shitload of Russian orders. There were a LOT. Many people are about to move way up the line. I’d assume the same for our competitors. 

 

Matagi

Super Antichrist


I like this. Will be too high for most French channels, sadly. 

Ah well. Must stay on the Med, then (the black roof will be sooo hot, I fear. Put some solarpanels there, if it has to be).

 
Last edited by a moderator:
A

Amati

Guest
Marine Engineering Consultants, Coomera QLD. Otherwise super nice guys and very good build quality.  Just read they went into liquidation late in 2020.

That latter diagram was on a blackboard in an aero course I took and it sure stuck with me. Biplanes with wires = super draggy.
And unstayed masts on sailboats are slow.  ;)

 

kokopelli

Anarchist
As a lifelong sailor on the quest for the "perfect" day boat we developed and built our Momentary lapse of Reason:  A 30 ft powercat for Florida waters.  She easily cruises in the ocean at 22-24 kn and 5nm/gal.

MLR red snapper.jpeg

20200625_142634.jpg

 

ProaSailor

dreaming my life away...
6,124
810
Oregon
As a lifelong sailor on the quest for the "perfect" day boat we developed and built our Momentary lapse of Reason:  A 30 ft powercat for Florida waters.  She easily cruises in the ocean at 22-24 kn and 5nm/gal.

View attachment 499821

View attachment 499822
Paul Bieker design: https://biekerboats.com/project/30-ft-semi-foiling-power-cat/  (details and photos)

  • Displacement to DWL: 1,950 kg (4,300#)
  • Max Payload: 870 kg (1,918#)
  • Cruising Speed (Non-Foiling): 20 kts @ 4,200 rpm
  • Fuel Consumption: 12 L/hr (3.1 gal/hr)
  • Range at Cruising Speed: 320 nm

1812-101B-Web-Arrgt-Sht-01-1024x724.png

Improved on earlier COMMUTER CAT design?  https://biekerboats.com/project/plywood-commuter-cat/

 
Last edited by a moderator:


Latest posts



Top