Sailors Powerboat

Airwick

Member
486
225
Victoria, BC
I you want long range, comfort in a seaway and efficiency:

ILAN-VOYAGER-Ext-03.jpg


http://www.nigelirens.com/boats/power-boats/ilan/

Or a bigger version:

Adastra-Superyacht-by-John-Shuttleworth_04.jpg


http://www.shuttleworthdesign.com/adastra.php

 

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
12,836
2,542
Its amazing how often 1nm/gal is what people tend to get. I got pretty much the same on our Fountain sport fishing boat, on the Nordic Tug 32 we chartered, on our offshore speed boat, on our lake hot rod jet boat, on both the Fleming 55 and 65 I was fortunate enough to cruise long distance aboard. Somewhat different speeds (8 to 60 knots), but surprisingly similar fuel burns, gas or diesel. Maybe it has to do with what the humans can stand. More power is more fuel burn, but also more noise and vibration, and sometimes more harsh motion underway,
Haha. If the fountain is 800 hp or so at 60 knots on gasoline, that's pretty dead on.
Well diesel is close to 20 bhp/gal/hr...and gas around 12-13 ish depending.

A 70 foot 1400 hp planing boat doing 22 knots is pretty comfy too. But that's 3.2 gal per mile.
However an 8000 hp tug doing 13 knots with its barge is super comfy. But not 1 nmpg:)

 
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Cheap Beer

Anarchist
549
17
Anacortes, WA
Gorgeous.  That's just the sort of vessel that tempts me away from the sailboats occasionally.  The trip to Catalina from here is just a long slog directly into wind, waves and current anyway.  How would you rate the comfort in a swell versus a keelboat?  I never get seasick on sailboats, but have gotten violently ill on planing hull sport fishing vessels a few times due to (I think) the quicker pitching motion.  I have never been on a trawler style boat for any length of time.  





 
I agree the motion on a powerboat is different than a sailboat. Any long crossing of bluewater, I'd much prefer the slower roll of a sailboat. This boat has a quicker roll period (3-4 sec) than most because of its low CG. On the other hand, she is very stiff, resisting initial roll and motion, especially underway. We crossed many exposed sections of water on the east coast including the Gulf Stream and several of the Great Lakes, and Georgia Strait in the PNW. Like any sensible boater, I picked my weather window carefully and avoided beam seas when I could.

BTW, the 3.75 nm/gal fuel burn was real-calculated over 10,000 GPS miles traveled divided by gallons of fuel purchased.

 

lasal

Super Anarchist
2,558
172
Denver
Looks great but how is it possible? Hull speed should be around 8kts, so 10kts at 1gph seems particularly optimistic, no?  Particularly if something like the skoota gets 7nmpg - know it’s more complicated than that but I’d love to know how/if it works. 
Bieker lists the specs for that design, and my spreadsheet shows about 33hp (at the prop) for 10knots. Hull speed is 8.37, at 22hp. So it takes 11hp to slide up on the bow wave an additional 1.63kn (semi-displacement features). 53hp naturally aspirated Yanmar with a 3:1 gearbox and that huge 29" VP prop. According to Yanmar, that fuel burn is not optimistic. Your mileage may vary, especially if using the Paravanes in rough conditions.

The Skoota's Honda just isn't as efficient and those extra 4knots (14knots cruise it said) require that much more fuel.

Bieker's 40'er is I would call a sailor's powerboat because it has a very efficient hull form with the freeboard kept low, and it's designed to cover some ground in most conditions (VP prop and Paravanes). It's unusual because the market generally prefers bigger boats on that DWL. Buyers calculate the added fuel burn for a Selene for example, and see the fuel cost difference isn't that big in the grand scheme of owning and operating the boat. And, sailors could argue that if you're going to build a sailboat hull, more or less, and add Paravanes, why not put a sailing rig and a ballast keel on it and live with 7knots under power?

 

Veeger

Super Anarchist
Bieker's 40'er is I would call a sailor's powerboat because it has a very efficient hull form with the freeboard kept low, and it's designed to cover some ground in most conditions (VP prop and Paravanes). It's unusual because the market generally prefers bigger boats on that DWL. Buyers calculate the added fuel burn for a Selene for example, and see the fuel cost difference isn't that big in the grand scheme of owning and operating the boat. And, sailors could argue that if you're going to build a sailboat hull, more or less, and add Paravanes, why not put a sailing rig and a ballast keel on it and live with 7knots under power?
^ This.         +1    

If you're buying or building a new boat,  the cost of fuel (even if it tripled) is not a factor overall.   (availability of fuel at any price however, might be a determining factor when choosing your dream/bug out boat)

 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
4,976
774
worldwide
^ This.         +1    

If you're buying or building a new boat,  the cost of fuel (even if it tripled) is not a factor overall.   (availability of fuel at any price however, might be a determining factor when choosing your dream/bug out boat)
Its the availablity ...sometimes one hundred miles of coast with no marine fuel docks...jerry jugs  and taxi cabs are ok ...but it gets old fast .

in high season a fuel dock might have a one hour or more waiting line of boats 

the reason you have a motorboat is to cover miles fast ...how fast  and how many miles is a number only the client knows 

 

teamvmg

Super Anarchist
1,969
103
Flat sides so fenders sit nice against sailing boat

Light composite construction so it doesn't bang against sailing boat when alongside [Needs water ballast tank tho]

No skeg or V so it can go right in to shore to take dogs for a p#ss. First mate can get ashore without getting her feet wet too

Open transom [Great for dragging wake boarders, dogs and conger eels through]

Double berth 

Pssyche.jpg

 

barleymalt

Super Anarchist
11,164
27
Michigan
You guys are way overthinking this. I have a 20 foot center console that works pretty well for me. It has done race committee, served as a dive platform and lake runabout, not hard to get on and off the trailer, and pretty damn hard to hurt.  Just hose it down, and it's happy. It takes chop and swells pretty well, None of the floating piano or things that can't fit in a slip or that you are afraid to actually use.

 

Ishmael

≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈
48,209
9,467
Fuctifino
You guys are way overthinking this. I have a 20 foot center console that works pretty well for me. It has done race committee, served as a dive platform and lake runabout, not hard to get on and off the trailer, and pretty damn hard to hurt.  Just hose it down, and it's happy. It takes chop and swells pretty well, None of the floating piano or things that can't fit in a slip or that you are afraid to actually use.
I don't think I'd want to take it on a 3-month cruise around Vancouver Island.

 

Unkle Krusty

Member
379
61
Gabriola BC
I don't think I'd want to take it on a 3-month cruise around Vancouver Island.
Our Yacht Club did a cruise around Vancouver Island in 017. At first we had quite a few interested. But then the power boat owners started adding up the fuel costs. 5 sail boats did the trip. No fizz boats. They either; used too much fuel, lacked cruising comforts, rolled like a bastard, had trouble punching in to waces, or all of the above. A Fisher 30 with 45 hp was the fastest under power, and the slowest under sail. The 39 foot long keel sail boat sailed and motored well. The 40 long keel heavy sail boat was a bit slow, both modes. The 32 foot Hunter with the big main and small jib, went okay, both modes. Our Viking was the second fastest under power at around 7.1 in flat water, and the fastest under sail. All told we did 980 NM. Was easy to add up the fuel used. The main tank is 48 liters, which is not much. We carried three 20 liter jugs. We stopped most everywhere and took 2 months. Can be done in a couple of days in a fast fizz boat. But what for. My idea of a power boat, is a bigger engine and trim tabs for the Viking. Might hit 7.5 to 8. But we do that with the sails up. We motor at around 5.75. Sometimes at 3 when the waves and wind and current are against us. Sometimes zero, for a while, until the tide changes. The Viking has a shit hot motion.

The other 360 boats we met were all sail. An Ontario 32 from Sidney BC. A slow heavy steel boat from Puget Sound area. We would be about 2 hours in front of him after about 40 miles.

Unkle Krusty

 

Pertinacious Tom

Super Anarchist
60,961
1,625
Punta Gorda FL
Flat sides so fenders sit nice against sailing boat

Light composite construction so it doesn't bang against sailing boat when alongside [Needs water ballast tank tho]

No skeg or V so it can go right in to shore to take dogs for a p#ss. First mate can get ashore without getting her feet wet too

Open transom [Great for dragging wake boarders, dogs and conger eels through]

Double berth 

View attachment 256894
Would you be insulted if I nominated this for Admiration by the Society?

 
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