Santa Cruz 70 - Fleet Roll Call

Cal20sailor

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I just looked on YW and Mirage is for sale too...

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1990/santa-cruz-70-2850116/?refSource=browse

There are a couple SC 52s for sale and I'm shocked they are asking 300's for them! Are they really getting that for the younger sisters?

The SC 70s are going in the 200's which is what I would have suspected...
The 70's are exactly what you want sailing.  Anyone wanting to do a Rimas should buy a 70 and sail it with a jib and still go fast as hell.  They are really well built. 

 

SF Woody Sailor

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I just looked on YW and Mirage is for sale too...

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1990/santa-cruz-70-2850116/?refSource=browse

There are a couple SC 52s for sale and I'm shocked they are asking 300's for them! Are they really getting that for the younger sisters?

The SC 70s are going in the 200's which is what I would have suspected...
The 52's are much more nicely finished, and they can go upwind reasonably well and buoy raced, neither of which is the intended pastime on a SC70. Having said that, if you want to go downwind joyfully and can pay others to do the return trip it is hard to imagine a better ride than a SC70 or SC50.

 

Cal20sailor

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The 52's are much more nicely finished, and they can go upwind reasonably well and buoy raced, neither of which is the intended pastime on a SC70. Having said that, if you want to go downwind joyfully and can pay others to do the return trip it is hard to imagine a better ride than a SC70 or SC50.
Have you sailed on any of the boats you mentioned?  The 70 goes uphill very well.  The 52 is a great boat, but if it's my money, I'm buying a 70.  

 

Monkey

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The 52's are much more nicely finished, and they can go upwind reasonably well and buoy raced, neither of which is the intended pastime on a SC70. Having said that, if you want to go downwind joyfully and can pay others to do the return trip it is hard to imagine a better ride than a SC70 or SC50.
Hmm...  doesn’t sound at all like any of the three 70’s I sailed on. They go upwind like a freight train, albeit a bouncy one from time to time. They’re also gobs of fun to buoy race!  (I’m the fat kid jumping the kite, which is a long running joke from that picture.  My shirt seemed to inflate and I looked huge!)

E834480B-D0C5-40B7-B51A-0C1A989A42FB.jpeg

 
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SF Woody Sailor

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Have you sailed on any of the boats you mentioned?  The 70 goes uphill very well.  The 52 is a great boat, but if it's my money, I'm buying a 70.  
Sure; sailed SC50, SC52, SC70 and Merlin (also SC27 and SC40 although thread drift). They are all awesome boats. I did a PacCup, SF-Catalina, local ocean stuff and a bunch of buoy races on the SC50 but only shorter stuff on the others (including Merlin's maiden sail with the canting keel which is a story for another day). I think it would be difficult to dispute that the SC52 is the best buoy racer in the bunch. It was designed that way. The SC50 and SC70 certainly can go upwind (reasonably well at times), but that was not the task for which they were designed.

If it were my hypothetical money (keeping in mind that I am in NorCal) I would get the SC50. The 70 is too impractical because of its draft, and anyway there would be nobody to race against up here. The SC50 is heaps of fun downhill.

Since it is my actual, not hypothetical, money I have a Lapworth 36. This was the ultralight prototype (well, 71 were built into a healthy OD fleet so not exactly a one-off) for the even lighter Cal 40 which in turn was the spiritual Father of Merlin and in turn the SC70 so I would argue (after a couple of Mt. Gay and Tonics) that  mine is the original West Coast Sled. ;)

I can hear you spluttering out your cocktails, but my 36' mahogany masthead sloop weighs less than a J35 so it was pretty ultralight for the day!

 
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SF Woody Sailor

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They’re also gobs of fun to buoy race!)
I agree although the fun downhill legs seem to only last about 10% as long as the uphill ones. One of the neatest features of buoy racing them is that when they t-bone you can hear it for MILES! (witness 1992 BBS).

 

Cal20sailor

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I agree although the fun downhill legs seem to only last about 10% as long as the uphill ones. One of the neatest features of buoy racing them is that when they t-bone you can hear it for MILES! (witness 1992 BBS).
I did the Chicago scene with the 70's and collisions were verboten.  Protests were usually never flagged but dealt with at the bar.  When one boat was accused of too much rail meat, they were met on the dock with a scale.  Great times and though I didn't sail with him, Tom Neill is missed.

 

SF Woody Sailor

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I agree although the fun downhill legs seem to only last about 10% as long as the uphill ones. One of the neatest features of buoy racing them is that when they t-bone you can hear it for MILES! (witness 1992 BBS).
In the BBS collision, IIRC, the ingress into the cockpit was eventually slowed by a primary winch on the t-bone recipient. 

 

sledracr

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In the BBS collision, IIRC, the ingress into the cockpit was eventually slowed by a primary winch on the t-bone recipient. 
Yup.  Maverick's bow cut through the toe-rail like it was butter, went several feet through the topsides/deck and ended up against the primary drum.  Nearly cut the back 8 feet off the boat... Somewhere I have a picture of Dave Ullman standing inside the hull with his head poking through the hull.

Maverick's damage consisted of about 10 pounds of bondo knocked out of place.

 

Coolerking

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LBC
Westerly is still active in the PNW (Home port Victoria, BC) and has done a few hawaii races in the last few years. She's also had a massive refit recently; looks gorgeous and is an absolute rocketship.

PS She's for sale:

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1987/santa-cruz-70-uldb-3250125/
I forgot how much just looking at something that long ago saved your life and made your life what it is today could flood the brain with snapshots in time. 

Thanks.

If I had a quarter million I'd buy it today.

 
I had the cash piled up to get a 70, until I went sailing on one at age 60: nope, no way. If I was still 30, no problem. But it was only the under 30s aboard that could actually work the boat, all us old farts were basically a waste of time, space, and weight. Wisdom did not make up for age. So once it became reasonable financially, it was out of reach physically.

I like my Olson 40. Seems a practical size. I can easily toss a carbon headsail up on deck through the forward hatch.

 

stayoutofthemiddle

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Hmm...  doesn’t sound at all like any of the three 70’s I sailed on. They go upwind like a freight train, albeit a bouncy one from time to time. They’re also gobs of fun to buoy race!  (I’m the fat kid jumping the kite, which is a long running joke from that picture.  My shirt seemed to inflate and I looked huge!)

View attachment 308307
...it was always my understanding that they "DIDN'T go up wind like a freight train". I though the sucked up hill but killed it off the breeze. At least that is the story I always heard for the ones on the Big Lake that did the Mac...

 

Cal20sailor

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...it was always my understanding that they "DIDN'T go up wind like a freight train". I though the sucked up hill but killed it off the breeze. At least that is the story I always heard for the ones on the Big Lake that did the Mac...
You heard wrong.  Check out last year's Mac results on "the Big Lake."  IIRC, it was largely upwind.  

 
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captain_crunch

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This thread got me curious about the differences between Merlin and the production Santa Cruz 70s.  Some of the dimensions vary based from one source to another.  Also, I'm not sure if the dimensions I found for Merlin refer to her original configuration or her rebuilt configuration.  As I understand it, the Santa Cruz 70s have significant variations form one boat to another.

LOA

Merlin:  68 feet

SC70:  70 feet

LWL

Merlin:  62 feet

SC70:  64 feet

Beam

Merlin:  12 feet

SC70:  15 feet 1 inch

Draft

Merlin:  9 feet

SC70:  7 feet (or is it 9 feet?)

Displacement

Merlin:  24,000 lbs

SC70:  35,000 lbs

Ballast

Merlin:  10,500 lbs

SC70:  9,600 lbs

Sail Area

Merlin:  1834 sq. ft.

SC70:  1362 sq. ft. (or is it 1520 sq. ft.?)

 

sledracr

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Draft

SC70:  7 feet (or is it 9 feet?)   9 feet was standard, the turbo'd ones were deeper

Displacement

SC70:  35,000 lbs  24,000 was the "brochure" displacement, individual boats displaced more or less depending on construction, configuration, etc. 

 
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proOC

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I see Nick often and sometimes talk about the old girls.  Chance was pretty spartan in her day.  Was fortunate to have raced a CYC event with them years ago.

 

proOC

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Did any of the sleds ever make it down to KWRW? Seems like a lot of boat to take on the road!
In the day, maybe but I can not think of one at the moment.  I do remember racing the Havana Cup in 98'.  There was a SC 70 and it was renamed.  If I remember correctly it was the old Thirsty or possibly Pied Piper.  

 
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