Santana 35 Hull Construction

12 metre

Super Anarchist
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English Bay
Timur said:
Precisely.  I also owned Santana 30/30GP in early 90s.  Beautiful boat in terms of layout and deck space.  Also rated 120.  The J80 came out same time and kicked our asses every race.  The old school designs were just aweful performing boats.  OK upwind, but atrocious offwind.  Broaching bitches.  Glad them days over.  Why anyone would waste $1000s to restore the dog is not debatable, it's silly stupid.
Pretty simple really - because some people like to cruise their local waters as well.

OK, the GP not so much, but you could certainly cruise the PC version.

 

Crash

Super Anarchist
5,076
1,010
SoCal
Did a ton of weekend overnights on my 30/30RC.  It was a great boat for that.  Plus could race it as well.  And as a MORC hull, it actually goes downwind pretty damn well I'd say.  Sure it won't get on a plane, but neither will a J/80 unless its really blowing.

 

Jeff K

Member
A Santana 35 was my fist sailboat. Definitely likes the heavy air better but with a short fractional rig it's probably just right for double handling with limited experience. It's also better behaved downwind than most IOR boats. Just do it man!

 

JPD

Anarchist
509
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LIS
I've come across a 1979 Santana 35 while looking for a coastal cruiser. Not many photos, and I've requested more, but they get a pretty good write-up. My research came across a site "About Santana 35" that said the hull was hand glassed with balsa core. The integrity of a balsa core in a boat this age worries me. Are my worries highly justified? I would expect some osmosis in a 40yr old glass boat, and in solid glass I don't see it as a major issue, but in a balsa sandwich I am guessing the moisture can have more serious structural consequences. Is a survey going to be highly reliable in picking up internal damage?
My 73 Ranger 33 taken last fall finishing a race. Solid glass hull. 

Your right about the moisture. If the inevitable leaks were ignored, the deck will be a nightmare.

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Somebody Else

a person of little consequence
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PNW
The Santana 35 is under-canvassed until the more realistically rigged boats are starting to reef. At that point they start to sail (unreefed) to their potential.

Witness the Schock 35: A Santana 35 hull with the bow made with less overhang (longer waterline, finer entry) and a much needed jacked-up rig. The Schock 35 was made by mocking up a more plumb stem on the Santana and fairing everything to that with straight tangents... nothing fancy. Instant success.

 

sail2fast

New member
2
0
Santana 35 was my first keel boat and we raced the crap out of it.  Ocean and one-design SF bay racing.  Could really take a beating.  Won the crewed Farallons overall on a windy year.  The only structural repair was a simple job--reinforcing the seat back to hull attachment (due to chainplate loading).  You get a lot of boat for very little money (sleeps 8, standing headroom, etc).

However, nobody has brought up the rig yet--aluminum fractional rig that bends a lot in normal use.  Best to check it carefully, as it would be difficult and expensive to replace...

 

BobBill

Super Anarchist
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101
SE Minnesota.
Like most "old" stuff, hulls, blocks, etc are built to last, and seldom are  abused, personal inspection notwithstanding. 

Though not large, my  current wee rig is composed of old hulls and some new stuff, and not destined to sit in a landfill for eons, from which I saved them...

However, one cannot ignore the regeneration costs in tems of time, labor and moola. Then there is mooring and storage etc...

Personally, I like old...lasting rigs keep "lasting" avec some satisfying effort.

 
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rudimentary

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561
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PHRF NW
I have many great memories sailing on a 'Tuna 35. Back in the day we won our Div. against a very tough fleet at the Whidbey Island Race Week in a Santana 35.  Yes, they like breeze but do OK in moderate winds as well. I have come across far less water logged Santana 35's compared to many J Boats of the same era. For the money the Santana 35 offers a lot of bang for the buck. The aft. berths are huge which is great as the v-berths are almost always non-existent. Being a frac. it is easier on your headsail budget and for cruising you don't need to worry about the runners. Many had Volvo's diesels for power so that kind of sucks but otherwise I think a decent boat - beamy and a fair bit of draft for the era.  In big breeze with the blade and a full six pack of beef on the rail you can give PHRF headaches to a lot of faster hardware out there. You can do way worse than a Santana 35 is my .02 

 

alanfw

Member
58
8
Hervey Bay
Thankyou everyone for the interesting discussion. By the sound of it, the Santana 35 is not a good choice for 2 handed (or single handed) sailing, which is one of my major requirements.

 

Somebody Else

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By the sound of it, the Santana 35 is not a good choice for 2 handed (or single handed) sailing, which is one of my major requirements.
Well neither is the Moore 24 which Webb Chiles took around the world...

After he retired, my friend took a Santana 35 from Los Angeles to Malaysia, stopping at virtually every island along the way, mostly single-handed. The biggest obstacle he dealt with was storage. Storage for tools, spares, food, clothes, etc. Smallish fuel tank and fresh water tank. Other than that he didn't have many complaints.

There are a lot of little tweaks you can do to a boat set-up for full crew to make it better for single-handing. This is the area where experience really matters.

  • Setting up the reefing so it is easy to use.
  • Hanks on the heads'ls instead of luff groove systems.
  • Slides on mains'l instead of bolt rope in a groove.
  • ...many more
 

alanfw

Member
58
8
Hervey Bay
Well neither is the Moore 24 which Webb Chiles took around the world...

After he retired, my friend took a Santana 35 from Los Angeles to Malaysia, stopping at virtually every island along the way, mostly single-handed. The biggest obstacle he dealt with was storage. Storage for tools, spares, food, clothes, etc. Smallish fuel tank and fresh water tank. Other than that he didn't have many complaints.

There are a lot of little tweaks you can do to a boat set-up for full crew to make it better for single-handing. This is the area where experience really matters.

  • Setting up the reefing so it is easy to use.
  • Hanks on the heads'ls instead of luff groove systems.
  • Slides on mains'l instead of bolt rope in a groove.
  • ...many more
You make very good points...  Ease of depowering (reefing main, furling or changing headsail) is VERY high on my list of requirements, as is full 6ft headroom.

 

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