Sausage bags?

bridhb

Super Anarchist
3,267
893
Jax, FL
Anyone know where these can be bought?  I have hank on sails and  flaking, rolling and stuffing them into a normal sail bag, sailing alone, can be difficult at best, and then the bag has to be squeezed through the hatch.  Was thinking a sausage bag (if that is even the correct nomenclature) that could handle the flaked sail, folded over once, might be easier to handle.  Especially with my newer sails (dacron) that are still chrisp and don't fold down very well.

Who sells them?  Any better ideas (except for roller furling)?

 

slug zitski

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worldwide
Anyone know where these can be bought?  I have hank on sails and  flaking, rolling and stuffing them into a normal sail bag, sailing alone, can be difficult at best, and then the bag has to be squeezed through the hatch.  Was thinking a sausage bag (if that is even the correct nomenclature) that could handle the flaked sail, folded over once, might be easier to handle.  Especially with my newer sails (dacron) that are still chrisp and don't fold down very well.

Who sells them?  Any better ideas (except for roller furling)?
Normally I ask the sailmaker for old bags 

sometimes they need new zippers or repairs 

the internet sailmakers sell them new 

https://www.precisionsailloft.com/product/long-genoa-sail-bag/

If the bag will be outside in the UV you must have s custom sunbrella bag built 

 

European Bloke

Super Anarchist
3,407
823
Flaking headsails on your own is a bit of a bastard.

If love to know what tricks people have to make that easier on their own.

 
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inneedofadvice

Super Anarchist
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Sarnia
I like them for single handing. If you drop it correctly, it's almost flaked for you, just a little organizing. I'm about one for four tries.

 

Snowden

Super Anarchist
1,009
506
UK
Flaking headsails on your own is a bit of a bastard. If love to know what tricks people have to make that easier on their own.
If you have hanks you can flake it before you take it off the forestay. Otherwise roll it along the luff and accept you can't brick it.

 

Jono

Super Anarchist
1,090
149
Yep, I call it the poor mans flake.

We could be in from a twilight with the headsail in the bag / turtle, foredeck clear and enjoying a refreshment before the neighbours even got their headsail ready for a dock flake.

Doesn't work quite so well if you are bricking a headsail with battens.

 

climenuts

Anarchist
662
251
PNW
Anyone know where these can be bought?  I have hank on sails and  flaking, rolling and stuffing them into a normal sail bag, sailing alone, can be difficult at best, and then the bag has to be squeezed through the hatch.  Was thinking a sausage bag (if that is even the correct nomenclature) that could handle the flaked sail, folded over once, might be easier to handle.  Especially with my newer sails (dacron) that are still chrisp and don't fold down very well.

Who sells them?  Any better ideas (except for roller furling)?
Any sailmaker should be able to sell you one. North in Richmond gave me one for an old sail.

Flaking headsails on your own is a bit of a bastard.

If love to know what tricks people have to make that easier on their own.
My sails go into foils so I don't have hanks to help me out. When sailing I just do a butcher job and re-do it later. When re-doing it I do a rough upside down flake starting from the head on one side of the boat/dock and then do the nice flake back on the other side.

 

bridhb

Super Anarchist
3,267
893
Jax, FL

Foolish

Super Anarchist
1,686
363
Victoria, BC
Flaking headsails on your own is a bit of a bastard.

If love to know what tricks people have to make that easier on their own.
Leave them hanked onto the forestay.  Then starting from the back, flake them as you move forward.  Then starting from the back again, fold them over twice for a jib or three times for a genoa.  Then unhank them and put them in the bag.  I always leave the bag seam on the starboard side, so that I can just dump the sail out again at the forestay and I know that it is ready to hank on again.

Someone should write a book about this.

Flaked.jpg

 

bridhb

Super Anarchist
3,267
893
Jax, FL
I just need to read your book for the 3rd time (I have bought 2, so you made 20cents off me?)...it has been a while, I  am old and forget stuff.  That is the way I do it, and roll it up and get a tie around it while it is still hanked on, but I am working with a "normal" sail bag and it gets difficult to get it all in at the size that will go through the fairly big fordeck hatch, while the boat is taking care of itself, which it does surprisingly well (I will get a tiller and an autopilot some day, after I relocate the traveler).  It is still a problem even at the dock.  Hoping the sausage bags will help and be easier to drag down the hatch.

 

MRS OCTOPUS

Anarchist
641
195
AUSTRALIA
Ha, when I read these reply’s it seems so easy.

I set headsail turtle beneath sail, tied down well to deck.I have probably left the # 1 (6 meters on the foot) a little long and it’s now gusting 18 to 20, and the wind and waves are conspiring to drag it over the side.

Then fire the halyard, holding on for grim death, drag down the rest of the luff and put a few gaskets on , not too close to the luff otherwise the bronze piston hanks are hard to release. Release hanks while standing/sitting on sail to keep it on the boat, and getting very wet and cold, leave sheets attached in case it goes over the side and stuff  in turtle and close front zip, release sheets and close aft Zip.

I find that if I don’t bag the sails wind and wave action cause wear and trash sail over time.

Set #3.

Flaking nicely when conditions allow.

I bought a couple of used Big boat turtles (North) for peanuts, and made two from each , replaced the Zips and they have been great.

 
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joe.barry

New member
43
8
I made these coffin bags. Quick flake the sail on the deck while still handed on. Sail tie every 6ft, then unhank. Fold 4, 3 or 2x then put into the bag. Zip, tie straps and drag. They stack real well on a bunk, especially if you have some removable stacking poles to hold them in. You can sleep on them as they are 6' long. They treat composite sails gently, and Its done by one person. Easy to shove or pull out the companionway or hatch. Saw similar bags on a Vendee boat. These are very similar to surfboard coffin bags. Yes they are a bit involved, but they were fast to make once you got going. The handles on the sides and ends REALLY help. The bottom is Textilene mesh fabric for drainage and air drying.

 I had sausages, that were a long run of fabric with a zipper along the edges and a pull tie closure at each end. Tied them in 3 places with sail ties, but they tended to be kind of floppy for this singlehander.  

Get a Sailrite or Reliable Barracuda, learn to sew from Youtube, and you too can make lots of really cool stuff. Great therapy.

IMG_4676.jpeg

 
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slug zitski

Super Anarchist
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worldwide
Thanks!  What I was looking for.  Thought maybe half foot length plus some, flaked and folded over once, might work ok.
Don’t know your boat 

if I only had space , budget for one full length bag,  it would be the length of the mainsail foot

the main ,particularly with full length battens , must be handled with a zipper bag 

B4C66DEE-D991-466D-BC02-765AC5B9A095.jpeg

 
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bridhb

Super Anarchist
3,267
893
Jax, FL
I made these coffin bags. Quick flake the sail on the deck while still handed on. Sail tie every 6ft, then unhank. Fold 4, 3 or 2x then put into the bag. Zip, tie straps and drag. They stack real well on a bunk, especially if you have some removable stacking poles to hold them in. You can sleep on them as they are 6' long. They treat composite sails gently, and Its done by one person. Easy to shove or pull out the companionway or hatch. Saw similar bags on a Vendee boat. These are very similar to surfboard coffin bags. Yes they are a bit involved, but they were fast to make once you got going. The handles on the sides and ends REALLY help. The bottom is Textilene mesh fabric for drainage and air drying.

 I had sausages, that were a long run of fabric with a zipper along the edges and a pull tie closure at each end. Tied them in 3 places with sail ties, but they tended to be kind of floppy for this singlehander.  

Get a Sailrite or Reliable Barracuda, learn to sew from Youtube, and you too can make lots of really cool stuff. Great therapy.

View attachment 465553
OK, those are pretty neat.  You should start a business!

 

bridhb

Super Anarchist
3,267
893
Jax, FL
Don’t know your boat 

if I only had space , budget for one full length bag,  it would be the length of the mainsail foot

the main ,particularly with full length battens , must be handled with a zipper bag 

View attachment 465597
My boat is the older Dehler 34 DB-1 based cruiser.  We sail year round so the full battened dacron main stays on the boom.  Have had the boat for a few years and only time I have had the main off was when I put the new one on and a couple of times storm prepping the boat.  My upwind headsails are all dacron.  

 

Parma

Super Anarchist
2,905
367
here
1) at the dock, flake it perfectly, they way you want it to always be flaked.

2) while it is still flaked perfectly at the dock, take a marker that will permanently mark the sail and starting at the clew (not tack) write 1, 2 3, 4 etc on the leech at the mid point of every fold.

3) on the underside of each number 1, 2, 3, 4, etc write A, B, C, D etc 

4) if you do this you will be able to flake that sail perfectly each time regardless of which side of the sail you first begin flaking it on. This works for mains that live on the boom as well.

5) one of the keys to a good even, solid flake is to pull back (aft) HARD at each fold*: this helps extend the desired fold forward from the leech all the way to the tack.

* provided the sail is still attached at the tack and on a forestay or mast track!

 
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Parma

Super Anarchist
2,905
367
here
I made these coffin bags. Quick flake the sail on the deck while still handed on. Sail tie every 6ft, then unhank. Fold 4, 3 or 2x then put into the bag. Zip, tie straps and drag. They stack real well on a bunk, especially if you have some removable stacking poles to hold them in. You can sleep on them as they are 6' long. They treat composite sails gently, and Its done by one person. Easy to shove or pull out the companionway or hatch. Saw similar bags on a Vendee boat. These are very similar to surfboard coffin bags. Yes they are a bit involved, but they were fast to make once you got going. The handles on the sides and ends REALLY help. The bottom is Textilene mesh fabric for drainage and air drying.

 I had sausages, that were a long run of fabric with a zipper along the edges and a pull tie closure at each end. Tied them in 3 places with sail ties, but they tended to be kind of floppy for this singlehander.  

Get a Sailrite or Reliable Barracuda, learn to sew from Youtube, and you too can make lots of really cool stuff. Great therapy.

View attachment 465553
If I were a sailmaker I would offer these and get all the business.

 
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