SC50 Chasch Mer Auction 7/16

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
6,793
1,139
San Diego
WOW. That 50 looked in reasonable when it lived in HI. (not so long ago) Looks like some dreamer was going to "re-build" it.
 

PHM

Super Anarchist
1,053
54
Hull #1. Part of Santa Cruz history. My wife still talks about the time she was handed the helm while surfing into the harbor during a Wednesday night race when she was a UCSC student--a brief moment that stands out as a highlight of her 6 decades of sailing. It's amazing and sad how trashed a boat can get in 6 years. Nice website Here from better days, as recently as 2016. Hopefully the damage is mostly cosmetic and someone will pick her up and restore her to her former glory.
 

Chris in Santa Cruz CA

Super Anarchist
6,197
1,306
earths surface
Hull #1. Part of Santa Cruz history. My wife still talks about the time she was handed the helm while surfing into the harbor during a Wednesday night race when she was a UCSC student--a brief moment that stands out as a highlight of her 6 decades of sailing. It's amazing and sad how trashed a boat can get in 6 years. Nice website Here from better days, as recently as 2016. Hopefully the damage is mostly cosmetic and someone will pick her up and restore her to her former glory.
Some Wednesday’s back in the day there were multiple 50s a 70 and once in a while Merlin. One Wednesday I recall there was a powerful northerly which means flat water by the beach and we watched Merlin beam reach on plane from the pier past the boardwalk to the harbor mouth. Maybe 30 seconds. Like a cartoon. Then I got to do it on solings. Faster than the swells. Did it on an Olson 40 too. Ride over two or three swells before a lull drops you off the step. Nothing like it. Feels like you have harnessed a special power.
 

Chris in Santa Cruz CA

Super Anarchist
6,197
1,306
earths surface
Hull #1. Part of Santa Cruz history. My wife still talks about the time she was handed the helm while surfing into the harbor during a Wednesday night race when she was a UCSC student--a brief moment that stands out as a highlight of her 6 decades of sailing. It's amazing and sad how trashed a boat can get in 6 years. Nice website Here from better days, as recently as 2016. Hopefully the damage is mostly cosmetic and someone will pick her up and restore her to her former glory.
Geez that link makes this even sadder! Wtf They did the 2016 race with all that hoo haww and then walked away and sold it I guess. Maybe the prime mover died or ran out of dough. Had no idea there were different 50s though so the history piece on the site is interesting.
 

ConradGordon

Banned
11
5
The marina its at is well off the beaten path. My guess is it got parked there while seeking the lowest cost, most likely abandoned due to financial issues. Too bad, as the only foam cored boat it has a shot at still being in decent structural shape.
 
Too bad, as the only foam cored boat it has a shot at still being in decent structural shape.
My Olson 40 is about the same age (1983), and is entirely balsa core. There is nothing whatsoever bad about the balsa in my boat. My boat was ridden hard and put away wet for over 4 decades before I got her.

We went over everything quite carefully, and found exactly three areas: (1) under an inboard track, about 18" by 6"; (2) around the prop shaft strut; (3) around the speedo thru hull that was installed without any goo and only hand tight. For areas (2) and (3), the amount of damaged balsa around those wet-for-decades areas, the bad balsa was like peanut butter, but only about one inch of the core from the point of water ingress had been effected at all. Certainly far less than 8 hours of total work to repair all three areas.

While I have seen disastrous balsa problems, I have also seen disastrous foam core problems. With foam, if there is a problem, it's usually delaminatation, and in rare cases, the foam has failed (torn) between the skin. With balsa, if there is a problem, it seems to be very localized to specific holes.

In some cases where production skills were very lacking, like laying up 1990 era Bertrams out doors in Florida humidity, total saturation of balsa has occurred. So if the boat has no rigidity, run.

Balsa is very, very unlikely to delaminate or tear like foam. End grain balsa, installed and laminated with any kind of skill, seems to be a very durable material over many decades. Even if, as with my boat, inane installations were done.
 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
6,793
1,139
San Diego
Foam core de-lams almost always telegraph as bumps. Easy to find. Balsa core when saturated/rotten is either found by accident or by proper use of a moisture meter.
 

ConradGordon

Banned
11
5
My Olson 40 is about the same age (1983), and is entirely balsa core. There is nothing whatsoever bad about the balsa in my boat. My boat was ridden hard and put away wet for over 4 decades before I got her.

We went over everything quite carefully, and found exactly three areas: (1) under an inboard track, about 18" by 6"; (2) around the prop shaft strut; (3) around the speedo thru hull that was installed without any goo and only hand tight. For areas (2) and (3), the amount of damaged balsa around those wet-for-decades areas, the bad balsa was like peanut butter, but only about one inch of the core from the point of water ingress had been effected at all. Certainly far less than 8 hours of total work to repair all three areas.

While I have seen disastrous balsa problems, I have also seen disastrous foam core problems. With foam, if there is a problem, it's usually delaminatation, and in rare cases, the foam has failed (torn) between the skin. With balsa, if there is a problem, it seems to be very localized to specific holes.

In some cases where production skills were very lacking, like laying up 1990 era Bertrams out doors in Florida humidity, total saturation of balsa has occurred. So if the boat has no rigidity, run.

Balsa is very, very unlikely to delaminate or tear like foam. End grain balsa, installed and laminated with any kind of skill, seems to be a very durable material over many decades. Even if, as with my boat, inane installations were done.
No doubt your Olson is in great shape, as are a lot of balsa cored boats. But I would rank Olson as one of the better builders of ULDBs in that era. And yet I owned an Olson 30 several years ago that had completely rotted out and ended up in a dumpster. The reality is nine out of ten times when reading about someone having to do a recore job balsa is involved. So if I was looking at two similar boats that had obviously been neglected for some time and had a choice between balsa core and foam core the latter would get my vote every time. If I was having a new boat built, was using epoxy or vinylester resin, and utilizing infusion or at least a vacumn bag balsa would be my choice for all the reasons you mention. It really is the superior product (for me, at least) but has to be done right. I should mention the NW is not like CA- it's really wet (rain) where that boat is moored. Nearby Shelton gets 68" of rain a year. If that deck, etc. could leak anywhere- it probably did. Hell, sometimes the moss/fungus grows under the glass- I've seen it.
 
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illan_voyager

New member
43
11
(c) The proceeds of a sale under this section shall be applied first to the payment of any liens superior to the claim for charges, then to payment of the charges, then to satisfy any other liens on the vessel in the order of their priority. The balance, if any, shall be paid to the owner.

In other words: the marina gets their back moorage paid - a post or 2 online to muster up a good amount of attention, overall could end up being a cheaper way to sell a boat than cleaning it up & using a broker. Smart move?

Any # of reasons why a boat could've got to this point, borders/citizenship, divorce, bankruptcy, disagreement among partners, covid/related. It's best to hope it's better than it looks, remain a spectator, not judge & just wish for more good boats to come out of the woodwork
 

El Borracho

Verified User
6,687
2,656
Pacific Rim
Grime and surface weathering can be largely addressed in a day or two of scrubbing. Is she really known to be in bad shape? If she was in good condition recently then there is a good chance she didn’t suffer ills from neglectful exposure. Consider that even a 40 year old SC50 in good condition is likely to need new paint, varnish, standing & running rigging, sails and possibly an engine.

Those sexy clear finished wood cabin sides were always going to be an issue.

That most people see a unredeemable disaster, including the marina, could make for a real bargain.

I’d bid on her sight unseen. Maybe as much as $20k. Interesting gamble. Even flying halfway around the world ($2k) for the auction is a reasonable plan for a motivated bidder. Need to be there regardless to arrange for transport to a yard or landfill.
 
Projects always cost MUCH more than you think. So the amount to pay to purchase the project must be a very small number. $1 is perhaps appropriate. Better, get the marina to pay you $1k to get it outa there today.

Let’s say you wanted a boat that is perfect, like new. One might budget $200k, and end up spending $300k.

Compare what you can buy new for $300k with a perfect SC50.

We budgeted $50k, and I’ve got about $200k in my Olson 40, and I did a LOT of the work myself: all electrical, deck hardware, detailed rigging, and most systems.

While an SC50 is bigger than my Olson, the complexity is the same. So the cost won’t be much worse.

You can easily spend $1M on sails, of course. For daysailing and up to 6 days cruising, I get by with a carbon main and carbon jib, about $20k for a SC50. Mid teens common downwind, sailing it like a catamaran. Fun, easy, fast, safe. Gotta go carbon to make this work.

Result: Favorite “thing” I have ever owned. There is certainly nothing new for $200k I would swap for my Olson. Nothing short of $400k, really. And few under $600k.

So the potential is there. But you’ll spend, spend, spend, and spend some more to get there.
 

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