Single sailing with a 60ft yacht

BarnaBarca

New member
25
6
Barcelona
Hey guys
Let's talk single sailing with a 60ft yacht. What makes the boat a perfect single sailing cruiser for you? I have these key points
- maximum control from the inside. 360 view from saloon, cameras, etc
- easy maneuvering (hoisting and dropping sails, reefing, tacking and jibing, mooring). This includes furlers for everything, electric and hydraulic systems, mooring winch, last generation bow thrusters. 
- reliability, provided by overpowered systems, of good brands, with redundancy
- Plan B for possible emergencies, like manual furling backup
- security, provided by closed cockpit but with easy moving around the deck with high bulwarks (not so much a specific of solo sailing, but important for anybody who spends more days in the sea than onshore)
- easy access for maintenance everywhere. Large engine room, some workshop, etc

With this in mind, we started a custom project: the Ice 62 Targa. Any ideas what can be missed? Thank you!

 

BarnaBarca

New member
25
6
Barcelona
https://theislander.net/current-issue-june-2021-2/.    page nº108

1330655461_TheIslanderJune2021-108(1).jpg

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Foolish

Super Anarchist
1,686
363
Victoria, BC
Lots of nice features the make it singlehandable.  But I've always said that it's not what happens when everything is good, but what happens when everything goes wrong.   So what happens to the boat/skipper when one of the electric winches breaks?  Or when all power is lost?  Or when the halyard breaks and the whole jib ends up on the drink?   I'd be very interested in these kinds of considerations.

And why are there 3 cabins and 2 heads?  Who's going to clean those?

 
Last edited by a moderator:

BarnaBarca

New member
25
6
Barcelona
Guys, I understand your skepticism. Some time ago I would say the same thing.

As all comments are similar, I will reply all together. 

Concerning maintenance, it’s not that dramatic. You need to follow some rules like: anything you repair should be done for years, do maintenance in time, buy nautical material of high quality. How sailor repair things solo? - If you spend more days in the water then onshore you have to know how to repair things, there is no other way. And have a lot of spare parts, there is nothing new in it. The cleaning is not that difficult neither. Anyway, nobody says about making maintenance solo ;).

Emergency situations, this is a good point and that’s what we discussed for several months every day. As true for any short-handed sailing in my opinion, the point is to avoid them. Your sails will never fall down if you change halyard in time and make revision of your material regularly, as any ocean sailor. Energy, don’t use cheap lithium and change batteries in time and if it was mounted correctly it will work. Systems fail time to time, for this you need redundancy and spare parts. In case of urgency you have an option to furl sails manualy as Plan B and you also can trim sails by winch handle. Also you can pump lifting keel manually. Basically everything is designed to have emergency solution. Of course till some point. It is not IMOCA 60 and usually we don’t change rudders on the water as Pip Hare ;).

Foolish, what do you think, what other kind of situation you consider as difficult to manage solo on 60ft?

Hdra, depands on what you mean by “work for the builder”. I do mix passion with a work. I’m not contracted by any of boat builders but i sell boats and now build one ICE and one NEO. Also work with Italia yachts and follow vismara and milius. And also I sail and race as much as i can every week, mostly double hand, sometimes solo, on all types of boats from dinghy (foiling cat Whisper and mono MX Next) to TP52 (not series) and cruising boats 30-62ft. Here I talk as sailor to sailor, I would like to hear an opinion of comunity as we still have a time to add or change something

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Black Jack

Super Anarchist
Sail changes on a boat singlehanded like that will be a PIA for a solo sailor.

Considering the current target demographics that boat has - she will require hired young backs to help ready to leave port and sorting it out upon return. Perhaps the OP could call her Cha-Ching due her sailing ATM dispensing cash and credit characteristics once launched.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

BarnaBarca

New member
25
6
Barcelona
And I'd guess this is the guy who calls ahead for help docking.
Interesting point :)
Where I live there is no shame in calling mariners to help with lines, especially if you short handed. It is not such a question of your ability, more like a good seamanship, here is no lack of mariners usually. Why taking unnecessary risks. As I see in your place people take it as competition.

 

BarnaBarca

New member
25
6
Barcelona
Sail changes on a boat singlehanded like that will be a PIA for a solo sailor.

Considering the current target demographics that boat has - she will require hired young backs to help ready to leave port and sorting it out upon return. Perhaps the OP could call her Cha-Ching due her sailing ATM dispensing cash and credit characteristics once launched.
Really not at all. I prepare 62ft for going to sail solo (prepare solo, we sail double handed on 62) several time a month. From zero it takes 40 min with taking off covers hoisting gennaker and mounting sheets and putting a beer in a fridge. Not such a big deal! After sailing, it takes a bit more time.. 
Again, things are much easier than looks like

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Black Jack

Super Anarchist
Really not at all. I prepare 62ft for going to sail solo (prepare solo, we sail double handed on 62) several time a month. From zero it takes 40 min with taking off covers hoisting gennaker and mounting sheets and putting a beer in a fridge. Not such a big deal! After sailing, it takes a bit more time.. 
Again, things are much easier than looks like
How old are you? Most folks who would think about buying that boat would be over 60. Most self funded solo cruisers/racers are between 55 and 70. I know that most people that age and beyond struggle lifting sails in and out of cabin with boats over 40 feet.

A novice could daysail that boat without much of a learning curve, stocking the fridge with beer no problem. Making it easier to fix shit that breaks, easing trouble shooting complex electrical systems, and even making sail changes a breeze for solo cruisers that do distance and can handle changes due to weather should be the ideals for that recognized demographic, more valuable than adding farkles and tech. 

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Blue Crab

benthivore
14,801
2,169
Outer Banks
Interesting point :)
Where I live there is no shame in calling mariners to help with lines, especially if you short handed. It is not such a question of your ability, more like a good seamanship, here is no lack of mariners usually. Why taking unnecessary risks. As I see in your place people take it as competition.
No one I know  minds lending a hand but you're arguing for a solo experience so ... the real question is can you handle the boat by yourself? I'd say no.

 

MiddayGun

Super Anarchist
1,061
384
Yorkshire
There's no shame in asking for help with tying up the lines, but I wouldn't want to singlehand any boat that I wasn't confident that I could do it solo if required. 

Being in my early thirties puts me at probably the lower end of people on SA and probably half the age of anyone who could afford a boat like that and I'd not fancy regularly trying to get that thing on & off the dock single handed. Sure its possible, but not ideal. 

For racing solo I think 30-35 foot is the sweet spot for me, if I was going off cruising solo then probably something slightly bigger. 

I mean it all depends on what you want to do and where you want to go, a lot of your requirements like inside 360 view from the cabin, giant bulwarks and closed cockpits aren't really required for the type of sailing I'd say most of us do. 

 

spankoka

Super Anarchist
From the marketing point of view, I think the real competition in this niche is going to be from secondhand Deerfoots and Hunter HC50s, etc. With sailboats, you always have to give a very good reason to buy a new vs. used. 

 

BarnaBarca

New member
25
6
Barcelona
Cool to read it all, thanks to these comments, I am once again convinced that we are doing something new. I couldn't imagine this too and 10 years ago was telling that 43ft is a limit for a comfortable sailing. Although I would like some more technical discussions instead of analyzing the yacht market ;)

Black Jack, if you ask, I´m 40, guy I foil with is 63, and he can buy not a boat but a yard. Guy we sail on  ICE 62 double handed is around 60. The other guy I sail with, he is also around 60, and he makes doublehand races on his TP 52, this is a bit crazy, here I would agree =).  But it all doesn't matter, there is no sense in lifting sail from the cabin in 60ft cruiser. If you do it than you are on a Shipman or IMOCA. I would say you, I found it much more  effortless sailing 60ft than 40-43ft just because you move comfortable. And this is even taking in account that I prefer to lift sails by hand from the mast, for the rope twisting reason

Blue Crab, how difficult it to moor a boat depends more on how easy the boat is to steer. To moor X6.4 or Swan 65 or ICE 62 is just a little easier than Bavaria 40, although it can be more scarry. And new Side Power with power control and hold function is just fantastic to give you some minutes for lines

Midday Gun, racing small boats is more fun, I would agree 100% on this. ICE 62 Targa itself is not a daysailor as you can see. It is designed to live onboard for a long period. But I also wouldn't agree that 360 view for solo day sailing is not necessary. If you are along, with some other boats around, and you have to go down it's better you can see from inside what happens. About a closed cockpit, for me personally it's unnecessary neither.

Spankoka, have you ever wondered where used boats come from? Sorry, joke, of course you are right, in most cases. About Deerfoots and Hunter HC50, try to find one in Med ;)

 

Ron Swanson

Member
384
52
Los Angeles
The article is an unserious puff-piece. I don't see anything in this design that lends itself to singlehanding. It looks like any other Euro-cruising boat. I have a few solo miles on a 50 footer and there is nothing here that interests me. Naivete run amuck. 

 
Top