Slab Leak

Point Break

Super Anarchist
25,709
3,260
Long Beach, California
I just want to go on record that whatever idiot thought burying all the plumbing in a house in the concrete slab...especially in California........was a frigging idiot. Don't let me catch him in a dark alley (although I'm not very dangerous anymore).

 

Ventucky Red

Super Anarchist
10,889
994
I just want to go on record that whatever idiot thought burying all the plumbing in a house in the concrete slab...especially in California........was a frigging idiot. Don't let me catch him in a dark alley (although I'm not very dangerous anymore).
Let alone use galvanized pipes... 

 

White Lightning2

Anarchist
671
592
PNW
I just want to go on record that whatever idiot thought burying all the plumbing in a house in the concrete slab...especially in California........was a frigging idiot. Don't let me catch him in a dark alley (although I'm not very dangerous anymore).
It should only be allowed for drains and even then, only in corners or edges of the pour! We built our own home 20+ years ago and it has a basement bathroom and kitchen. Both are only the outer walls and only have drains under the slab.

Now, forgetting that the septic tank needed to be set 2' lower to accommodate the basement drains.........

Well, that's why there's a separate small tank and pump next to the big tank....

Wisdom comes from experience, experience comes from a lack of wisdom...

WL

 

DarthSailor

Super Anarchist
1,150
247
yep, basements are your friend with only the drains under the slab, even better pier and beam with no slab so all you have to do is some digging when things go wrong. My folk's house in Louisiana had the main sewer line go bad it was made of some cardboard and tar mix(WTF) and it took only a day to replace. their house was 4 feet off the ground with pier and beam foundation. They replaced the sewer line for like 2800 bucks with PVC from the house to the street and being Louisiana all the grass grew back over the trench in about a month. Plus the streets were not paved so no costs there either. 

 
I just want to go on record that whatever idiot thought burying all the plumbing in a house in the concrete slab...especially in California........was a frigging idiot. Don't let me catch him in a dark alley (although I'm not very dangerous anymore).
you should try a slab in texas, which btw is one big mud (clay) slide, heading to the gulf...   foundation repair is a big business..   pier and beam all the way baby, though I wish the person who thought 24" was tall enough gets wacked in the knee for such suggestion

 

Chris in Santa Cruz CA

Super Anarchist
5,316
913
earths surface
My house in Corvallis designed and built by an architect who spec'd every material down to the nails I think designed and had installed a radiant heating system in 1957 which still works today with no leaks. Proper concrete mix, copper pipe, low speed, low pressure flow, not in a seismically active area. It can work but when it doesn't it sucks

 
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gptyk

Anarchist
570
321
California
Condolences.

My neighborhood has direct contact between copper and concrete. All pipes in the slab. Cheap copper. Of course it didn't last. 

When folks that move here ask about getting a pinhole leak fixed, they really hate the answer "just repipe the whole house." After 2-3 more leaks they wise up. Repipe is a big biz in Orange County. My house is pex in the attic, no copper left. 

 

LakeBoy

Super Anarchist
Decades ago I got pressed into service on a repair.  (was working at the local boat dealer, it was his house.)

They re-plumbed the whole house from the attic and abandoned all the under/through slab supply lines.

 

Ventucky Red

Super Anarchist
10,889
994
Condolences.

My neighborhood has direct contact between copper and concrete. All pipes in the slab. Cheap copper. Of course it didn't last. 

When folks that move here ask about getting a pinhole leak fixed, they really hate the answer "just repipe the whole house." After 2-3 more leaks they wise up. Repipe is a big biz in Orange County. My house is pex in the attic, no copper left. 
At least here in Ventucky; from what my FIL tells me, the code didn't allow for the service line to be in the slab..  But my waistlines are getting close to 70 years old and they are beneath the slab.

I have already replaced the Orangeburg sewer pipe (another real "men of genius" idea) from the house to the city sewer, and I am hoping the cast iron holds out.  Guy at my local plumbing shop is telling me not to worry, stuff will survive a nuclear blast...   fingers are crossed.

 
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Mrleft8

Super Anarchist
24,595
3,066
Suwanee River
Same here in Cow country Florida. PVC pipe buried in concrete makes as much sense as...... Ummmm........... A screen door on a submarine..... (I was trying to think of something no one could find politically offensive)

 

Point Break

Super Anarchist
25,709
3,260
Long Beach, California
Condolences.

My neighborhood has direct contact between copper and concrete. All pipes in the slab. Cheap copper. Of course it didn't last. 

When folks that move here ask about getting a pinhole leak fixed, they really hate the answer "just repipe the whole house." After 2-3 more leaks they wise up. Repipe is a big biz in Orange County. My house is pex in the attic, no copper left. 
This is the 3rd hot water line slab leak, Repaired 1st in 2014 by excavation and repair. 2nd in 2015 with a short bypass. The 3rd one yesterday is being diagnosed and I asked for two bids, one for bypass and one for repipe of the 1st floor. We'll see. With 3 leaks in 8 years I'm thinking that another bypass is just putting off the inevitable. 

 
As someone mentioned above, slab leaks are very big business. The plumbers have a field day with this and cant wait to rip up your floors and start the demo process.

It can run into serious money almost instantly. Restoration companies are even worse, using the scare tactics on you while your water is now turned off and your home temporarily uninhabitable. Remember that you can reroute your pipe above ground and through the walls and/or ceiling saving you the cost of ripping up your foundation and flooring. Drywall and paint is much more economical. Another fact is Pex pipe is great until you have a rodent visit. They love gnawing on that plastic. You know what happens next.

 
455
166
so. cal.
This is the 3rd hot water line slab leak, Repaired 1st in 2014 by excavation and repair. 2nd in 2015 with a short bypass. The 3rd one yesterday is being diagnosed and I asked for two bids, one for bypass and one for repipe of the 1st floor. We'll see. With 3 leaks in 8 years I'm thinking that another bypass is just putting off the inevitable. 
I had my one and only slab leak 10 years ago. Didn't want to go the band aid route so i went with epipe epoxy lined service. No problems since and at the time was cheaper than repiping the whole house.

 

gptyk

Anarchist
570
321
California
This is the 3rd hot water line slab leak, Repaired 1st in 2014 by excavation and repair. 2nd in 2015 with a short bypass. The 3rd one yesterday is being diagnosed and I asked for two bids, one for bypass and one for repipe of the 1st floor. We'll see. With 3 leaks in 8 years I'm thinking that another bypass is just putting off the inevitable. 
Yup. Standard SoCal story. You should likely repipe. I did mine DIY during remodels, but my neighbor had a very good experience with one of the dedicated repipe companies. Decent bid, did a great job, everything but paint on the patched drywall in 2 days. Several other neighbors have used them. Don't remember who, but I'll ask. At least 70% of the houses around here (1974 development) have had to repipe. 

Rodents and PEX. Interesting. We have a massive rodent issue in my area. Keeps the cat busy. The PEX I installed has been in the attic for > 10years. Plenty of ratcrap up there when they find a way in.  (yes, I seal all holes when I can find em) They don't seem to like the pipe. The insulation, on the other hand, they love that shit. I really like using PEX-A instead of copper. I paid my way through college by being a HVAC tech, sweating copper is a piece of cake.  But PEX is just awesome. 10 seconds - 5 clicks of the magic Milwaukee tool and that's a connection that will never fail. 

 

Mrleft8

Super Anarchist
24,595
3,066
Suwanee River
I despise PVC. I'm not a fan of PEX either, but it's better than PVC.

 Copper Is my preferred water conduit, but I understand that it's very expensive..... But if you plan on staying where you are for 15+ years, it's worth the extra, and..... A BIG AND..... You can fix it very easily... Unlike PVC.(and PEX is just a mouse trap....)

 Nobody around here uses copper. I had a hell of a time finding enough copper for a small hobby project. Think anyone around here knows how to sweat a joint? You get crazy grins and jokes.

 PVC rots in the ground, in the air, and crumbles when exposed to sunlight. It's stupid, and impossible to work with, not to mention made from very low grade material. PVC valves? 2 year life span MAX.

 
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