Snow Chains

shortbus

Anarchist
660
0
The Bay
Living in northern New England I have always had a 4WD car and/or good snows to get me by, but I'm up against a new problem this winter with a company Ford Escape that has fairly worn all seasons which the (leasing) company won't either upgrade or replace, never mind buying a 2nd set of tires. With this in mind I am wondering about finding some sort of chains or something which will get me by when the roads are nasty, but preferably something I can run at highway speeds since I will be covering a lot of miles. Any suggestions on a modern version of old school chains which can do all of this since my boss has offered to cover this expense? Any suggestions will be appreciated!

 

familysailor

Super Anarchist
3,732
132
San Francisco Bay
Check the owners manual to see what will work.

Cable "chains" fit very tightly might work. I don't know of any chain or variant that encourages speeds over 35 of so.

Had a Honda 600 back in the early 70's. The one that looked like a tipped over Maytag.

Was stranded going into LA at the north end of the Grapevine due to a large storm and chain controls. A guy at the Chevron station took pity on me and built a custom set of chains while the car was on the rack. The only way we could tension them was to partially deflate the tires, put the chains on, then re-inflate.

Worked outstandingly. FWD, so all i needed to do was point where I wanted to go and floor it. Hand brake to slow down if the back end tried to get in front. I could go anywhere as long as I kept the momentum up. It kinda floated through powder.

Are studded snow tires legal where you drive?

 

L Z

Reporters
Back in the early '90s I used to work for a company where we had the license to sell a sort of tire chair called "Yeti Snow Net" which was a very interesting product and worked pretty well. It was a "tire net" made out of rubber that wrapped the tires so it was quiet to ride and didn't damage the roads. They aren't exactly cheap and for your Ford Escape new tires may be close in price.

Interestingly, it has been around since the early '80s and in 2011 it won a "Good Design Award" (http://www.g-mark.org/award/describe/37842/?locale=en). Found a listing in the Japanese site for Rakuten (ex-Buy.com) at http://global.rakuten.com/en/store/tire1ban/item/7704/. Not sure where you would find them here in the USA today but here is what they look like:

11G08018_01_880x660.jpg


Also found these called "Snow-Claws" but not sure how well they work although it looks like they might do the job: http://www.flextrax.com/mycustompage0098.htm

 

U20guy2

Super Anarchist
12,330
1
Living in northern New England I have always had a 4WD car and/or good snows to get me by, but I'm up against a new problem this winter with a company Ford Escape that has fairly worn all seasons which the (leasing) company won't either upgrade or replace, never mind buying a 2nd set of tires. With this in mind I am wondering about finding some sort of chains or something which will get me by when the roads are nasty, but preferably something I can run at highway speeds since I will be covering a lot of miles. Any suggestions on a modern version of old school chains which can do all of this since my boss has offered to cover this expense? Any suggestions will be appreciated!
Is this your company car? Simple tell them its not safe with the current tires either put proper quality winter tires on it or your faced with having to limit your travels to when the roads are snow and ice free. If thats cutting into your pay - pony up and put your own snow tires on it - you can sell them when your done with the car.

No chain traction device will work especially at higher speeds and the new cars have very little clearance for them to start with.

BTW the neighbor in Ann Arbor a couple of years ago we ended up selling him some of our shop tools when we sold the house was for the first time ever given the option by his company to lease a Subaru Legacy - that first winter he had it was one of the worst they had seen in some time. He liked it so much his wife wanted one so they sold the fancy american luxury car they had and got another Subaru. He laughed said all the guys but two opted for the Subaru all the other guys got the Malibu lease option. I bet all of them have a Legacy now LOL.

 

jetboy

Super Anarchist
1,595
0
The only chains I'm aware of that are great for highway speed are something like these:



Just crash the car a few times and they'll get the idea...

 

burndoc

Super Anarchist
1,261
302
South Jersey
Are chains even legal anymore for passenger cars? I thought PA banned them a few years ago because of road damage. I may be wrong.

 

bmiller

Super Anarchist
5,894
1,174
Buena Vista, Colorado
Living in northern New England I have always had a 4WD car and/or good snows to get me by, but I'm up against a new problem this winter with a company Ford Escape that has fairly worn all seasons which the (leasing) company won't either upgrade or replace, never mind buying a 2nd set of tires. With this in mind I am wondering about finding some sort of chains or something which will get me by when the roads are nasty, but preferably something I can run at highway speeds since I will be covering a lot of miles. Any suggestions on a modern version of old school chains which can do all of this since my boss has offered to cover this expense? Any suggestions will be appreciated!
Is this your company car? Simple tell them its not safe with the current tires either put proper quality winter tires on it or your faced with having to limit your travels to when the roads are snow and ice free. If thats cutting into your pay - pony up and put your own snow tires on it - you can sell them when your done with the car.

No chain traction device will work especially at higher speeds and the new cars have very little clearance for them to start with.

BTW the neighbor in Ann Arbor a couple of years ago we ended up selling him some of our shop tools when we sold the house was for the first time ever given the option by his company to lease a Subaru Legacy - that first winter he had it was one of the worst they had seen in some time. He liked it so much his wife wanted one so they sold the fancy american luxury car they had and got another Subaru. He laughed said all the guys but two opted for the Subaru all the other guys got the Malibu lease option. I bet all of them have a Legacy now LOL.
+100

Both the comments on the current car what you should be driving. I have driven a Suby since 2001 and will not even think of anything else. Well at least for my commuter.

 

Bugsy

Super Anarchist
2,502
781
Canada
I am curious as to what kind of job you have where you HAVE to travel on dangerous roads.

I live in a pretty snowy and cold place. I have never lost a sale or customer when I say "the roads are bad - can we please re-schedule?".

No one should fault you for being safe.

 

Grande Mastere Dreade

Snag's spellchecker
Living in northern New England I have always had a 4WD car and/or good snows to get me by, but I'm up against a new problem this winter with a company Ford Escape that has fairly worn all seasons which the (leasing) company won't either upgrade or replace, never mind buying a 2nd set of tires. With this in mind I am wondering about finding some sort of chains or something which will get me by when the roads are nasty, but preferably something I can run at highway speeds since I will be covering a lot of miles. Any suggestions on a modern version of old school chains which can do all of this since my boss has offered to cover this expense? Any suggestions will be appreciated!
small , medium, or large company? if the company has a HR department, file a complaint that you are being forced into unsafe working conditions and any injuries sustained will result in a substantial lawsuit..

 

U20guy2

Super Anarchist
12,330
1
Living in northern New England I have always had a 4WD car and/or good snows to get me by, but I'm up against a new problem this winter with a company Ford Escape that has fairly worn all seasons which the (leasing) company won't either upgrade or replace, never mind buying a 2nd set of tires. With this in mind I am wondering about finding some sort of chains or something which will get me by when the roads are nasty, but preferably something I can run at highway speeds since I will be covering a lot of miles. Any suggestions on a modern version of old school chains which can do all of this since my boss has offered to cover this expense? Any suggestions will be appreciated!
small , medium, or large company? if the company has a HR department, file a complaint that you are being forced into unsafe working conditions and any injuries sustained will result in a substantial lawsuit..
Says someone who doesn't know what HR does. Mention Lawsuit to HR and you'll have your walking papers before you hang up the phone. HR's primary role is to protect the company not you.

Talk to your director or whom ever about the questionable tires on your company car and ask them what the protocol is for getting proper winter tire tread on it. Your not the first person to have this issue someone will know the best approach.

If your stuck with the car for a few years - I'd just get my own set of winter tires for it you can sell a winter set of tires for very little loss when your done with it if the tires are still in good shape if the tires are done then consider it the cost of keeping your hide safe and being able to meet with clients when you may have otherwise not been able to do so safely.

BTW - I never did understand why companies lease SUV type vehicles with higher price points and opt for the FWD version the company would have paid less if they had simply leased a Focus which has the same FWD capability in crap conditions as a FWD Escape - not to mention you get better mileage with the Focus.

 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
62,196
5,442
De Nile
yeah, stay away from HR. what's amazing to me is that HR Reps will sometimes raise cases, and then find out what really happens.

 

Death Roll

Super Anarchist
5,623
0
The only chains I'm aware of that are great for highway speed are something like these:

Which is still longer than the life expectancy of any pedestrians that run afoul of a vehicle so equipped.
Hard enough for them to dodge the wheels, and then they have to contend with the whirling chains of death.

 

dsquared

Member
112
1
ct
drive your own vehicle, leave the escape at the office and charge them the mileage, not worth arguing about personal safety.

 
Jesus. Do what we do in Minnesota when the roads are to bad, (which has to be pretty fucking bad. Like the plow trucks are getting stuck), stay home.
Cost and time of chains will be more than a set of snow tires. If it's bad enough for chains you shouldn't be out there anyway you will just be blocked by the people who don't have them. Weather predictions and plowing are so advanced now you can plan appointments around the conditions.

 




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