So I just bought an I-14 today...

Pete M

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pajon, from above

from 330 lb (~150 kg) thru 400 lb (~181 kg) is competive

Any mix between crew & driver. If there were a choice, might go bigger on the driver, but it doesn't seem to matter all that much

brett - Ned's "already got one"

(monty python ref)

 
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Brettmx

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Maybe you and Ron would like to go back and relive the old days. I've already tried to give the boat away so I'm thinking if I ask money someone will think it has value and want it.

 

BWR

Anarchist
870
41
San Diego, CA
if only tyco had appreciated my prose as much as you bobby (btw, don't forget #3 works welll when your fill-in crew has an unnanounced hypoglycemia attack mid capsize recovery)...

pete - look at the dude in the visor on this months page. much scarier looking than those rollers in hawaii last year, imnsho.

AA,

You're killin' me. How about the Nancy boy screaming for Mommy b/c he's skirred up on the bow (bottom of Jun 2006 calendar) I didn't think you needed a bow Monkey on these boats. Pete M looks like he's itchin' his Hemmroids in the (Dec 2005 B&W shot). Has everyone ordered thier calendars? They're going fast.

Mr. Clean,

Congrates, you'll love it. Definately get ahold of the Chicago / midwest group as they are all in the same situation as you and in steep learning mode. I heard one of my old boats was in Detroit area last yr., so there are some other 14ers around. Great to hook up w./ the Toranto group as well. Very helpful to spend time and discuss w/ others. Your sailing experiences are about to change for the better. Soon even the M-24 will be too tame in 25 kts. of breeze. Enjoy sailing unleaded!

 

Ned

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Brett,

The want one part was quoted from JDougherty just above.

I have three of them including an OD14 which is sold but not paid for yet, an ICE USA 1108, and an M12 USA 1157. To keep things simple all my mains say USA 1139.

We now refer to the Melges 24 as "the lead mine".

Dont stop pimping the B IV. The penultimates are a great gateway drug. About half of our fleet in kaneohe are penultimates.

 

Bill E Goat

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Some tips from one of our more experienced 12ft skiff guys

Skiffs Rule 1

In a contest between the rudder and the sails, when the sails are big they ALLWAYS win!

So sail it like a windsurfer (Its the only way you can go wavejumping 2 up!)

Roll the rig to windward to bear away and use fore and aft trim to change the helm, you will see twelves down under that are leaping to windward with both crew on the wire aft of the transome the rig raked over the tuck and to windward this is to ballance the boat.(like a windsurfer)

Skiffs Rule 2

There is no difference between dong the right thing too slow (or fast) and doing the wrong thing.

Both ways you end up "on the fin" so work on timing and train your reflexes (thats why not thinking about it works for people when they sail by "feel")

Skiffs Rule 3

If it is hard to pull on ease it, its faster and skiffing is an apparent wind game, just like windsurfing.

If it feels good DO IT

Skiffs Rule 4

The rudder is a handbrake and can only slow you down more or less, the boat will not jump untill there is no helm (when this occurs determines what range of breeze more than rig size, though minimising drag helps)

If you use it to round a mark , tack or gybe you will slow down, and if your trim and ballance is not perfect you will stall and the sails will win returning the boat to its natural state (perfect for a sudden a fin inspection).

Skiff Rule 5

"Flat is FAST" this applies to ALL sails as well as the boat trim, to allow acceleration and pump up your apparent.

Skiff Rule 6

The headsail will put you "in the piss" more than any other sail.

Unless your trim is perfect you cannot bear away without stalling, or round up at will, without the headsail eased.

When the breeze is fresh and you are two sail reaching, sail with the jib eased to just luffing so that you can go up or down a bit without touching it, or you will assume the position "on the fin again" (not arthur finnigan)

The headsail tacks the boat, by easing the headsail suddenly to spin the boat into the wind and then backing the headsail out of the tack.

Ensure you are through the tack and the boat is flat before sheeting on normaly.

Skiff Rule 7

Fast is safe, the sooner and faster you can get the boat moving the easier the boats are to sail,.

To do this get on the wire, no wire no pace, no pace no good, no good no sail.

It is faster and safer to be crouched on the wire than sitting on the gunwale.

Skiff Rule 8.

The lightest crewmember goes through first....

...and grabs the spinnaker sheet as far towards the clew as they can reach, the heavier behemoth lumbers through the boat as fast as he can heaving the boom through as he goes to speed himself up and assist the gybe, when the boat is dead square and goose winging the kite.

This is a stablising point and if the breeze is really wild or the waves require a pause you can over sheet the kite in this mode and backed or not you will hove too when he is sure the rig is not rolling too far or fast (there may be no pause at all with practice)the skipper yells "now" if he is the runner or simply pulls down to the water line with the spinnaker sheet, making the leach tight, and all that is required to blow the chute through onto the other tack is the smallest twitch on the tiller which is required because the heavyest has by now hooked up and is jumping on the wire allowing the boat to be pushed up filling the spinnaker on the new gybe, the lightweight has tailed new sheet in his spare time and the as the he hits the wire he drops th old sheet, the spinnaker fills with a crack and the boat jumps away assuming he has tailed enough sheet for it to fill.

Jumping on the wire after a gybe allows the boat to be pointed up and accelerate

the sooner you do this the less likely you will be to roll the rig the wrong way cause the rudder to be necessary, and as you are going slow the rudder will fail to beat the sails in the eternal contest.

As you gybe you must be accutly aware of where the masthead is as that is what is steering the boat with the headsail blanketed (like a windsurfer).

All other gybing systems are a variation of this method but with more freedom as the skipper and crew are closer in weight, but also harder as it is harder to keep enough weight on the wire and the sails full.

Skiff Rule 9.

Skiffs do have brakes, as in the example above you can hove to or you can be just trying to get settled after a set, a good method is for the crew to jump out first and as the boat speeds up the skipper follows, problem is that as the skipper jumps out his extra weight sends the boat ballistik, before he has his feet under a fruit loop(foot strap made of cord and plastic tube)you are airbourne with the bitch of all weather helm problems the rig comes to windward and you do an exiting maoeuver called the "windward skate" (or an all standing bearaway to by the lee with two on the wire) part of this move is performed with the crew underwater, and the skipper needs a new trappeze elastic.

OR the crew could just over sheet the kite, the boat heaves to and slows the lee helm jacks the skipper onto the gunwale and assuming he is hooked up the fwd hand tucks his skippers toes (both feet) under the straps where they belong.

and eases out the chute, this is the fun bit.

Works good to avoid collisions too.

Skiff Rule 10.

You know you have too much sail up, when you nose dive and round up at the same time (or you are in a 12' skiff)

When you have it all ballanced too perfection and you have the boat accelerating like a shower of shit off a shiny shovel you get a gust and bear away with it to keep the boat under the rig and next thing you know you are running square and the rig is still accelerating faster than the boat, then the nose starts to sniff, all Yahooing ceases and with a hush you hold the boat under full power straight nose dive (or "going down the mine") ballanced and true untill it is standing on its nose with the mast head on the water, the better the trim the longer it will stay (unless your pole is stuck in a mud bank)

There is no shame in mining, and it is often said the the famous trophy known as the "Miners Helmet" awarded to the "underall champion" has been won many times by the crew who jagged the overall the next season!

The Miners helmet is awarded heat by heat, and eventually for the series for the best straightest and most skillfull nosedives.

For going for more pace is the way to get out of trouble, win and also to do the best nosedives.

Stupid Skiff Trick 4 Play chicken with a 200ft Ferry

po_ferry_2.jpg

 

Brettmx

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Brett,
The want one part was quoted from JDougherty just above.

I have three of them including an OD14 which is sold but not paid for yet, an ICE USA 1108, and an M12 USA 1157. To keep things simple all my mains say USA 1139.

We now refer to the Melges 24 as "the lead mine".

Dont stop pimping the B IV. The penultimates are a great gateway drug. About half of our fleet in kaneohe are penultimates.
I'm picking up USA 1110 tomorrow and NZL 43 is getting shipped in a couple of weeks. The OD 14 is USA 236 and the old Bene is USA 1063 sister boat to Ron and Pete's 1062.

 

Brettmx

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Cool,congrats.
What is 1110? Is NZL 43 one of the Bourke B3's?

See you in Hawaii for PacRims then?

n

I'm not exactly sure what 1110 is- I believe it is a prototype B2 that was built for Paul B for the '96 Worlds. I don't know if was sailed there though. Maybe someone else knows. I'm going to use it basically for practice for a couple of months so I don't beat up on the B3. The B3 is one of Bourke's but was built by Dan Slater. The boat should be plenty fast given Dan got 4th at the last Worlds.

 

BWR

Anarchist
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San Diego, CA
1110 was the original BII that the molds were pulled off. Not sure, but I believe someone sailed it at '97 Worlds. Dan's boat will be good, (Ned it the sistership to Howards NZL boat which I think has made it to HI by now) Different look to it, very Bourkish appearance. Dan is a hell of a sailor and I think could make about anything go well. Will you be heading down to ABYC and San Diego for any of the winter series?

 

MR.CLEAN

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There are clearly some fucked up kids sailing these things. Thanks for welcoming me to the fold. Trust- I will not disappoint, at least if being fucked up in the head and not afraid of wet or pain is the chief prerequisite. And yeah, the girl is just as fucking out of her mind. And would be the first to admit it.

By the way, Brett, if that is your shit you wrote there, you need to expand it into a book. For real, that's some fruity kind shit you put up there, and the "rules" will be going on the wall if my office I use for inspiration. Right now it's got a 36 x 48 " print of the flying tiger deck plan.

Night...

 
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Bill E Goat

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Stupid Skiff Trick 1: Handstand Hiking

Stupid Skiff Trick 2: Skiff Wheelie

Only a queenslander would do this, the sun gets to them you know

head_stand.JPG

pom1__Large___Medium_.jpg

 

Matt D

Super Anarchist
Mr Clean, congrats. Welcome to the world of true insanity. The Midwest group has a few penultimates you could sail with. The Toronto fleet is solid with about 20+ modern I14s, and a half dozen 49ers. Most of their old I14s are here in Ottawa. The Ottawa fleet is a dozen I14s, half of which are penultimates (pre-96 rules I14s).

Your two best competition options if you want a significant regatta in the East, or Midwest is the Toronto fall regatta (Canadian championships this year, last year it was the North Americans, guaranteed to get 20+ I14s), or go to Ottawa, where every spring they host a multi-class skiff regatta. Last year it attracted about 40 skiffs.

I think that there's normally a regatta in Madison, much nearer you once per summer as well. The midwest high perf group mentioned above would have the details.

For info on the Toronto fleet, go to www.i14.ca, or for Ottawa go to their Newsgroup http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/ottawaskiffracingfleet/ .

 

kokopelli

Anarchist
I had a OD 14 GP for a few years in the '90s with my girl friend as crew. And yes, she is my wife now....

All of the above apply, but some comments were I-14 speciffic.

Check the hull for leaks. The boat has internal ring frames. To get all the water out you will have to stand it sideways/inverted.

Do tie off the shroud adjuster after tightening it. You don't want this to slip in a blow...

A newby mistake is to sail the boat like it is doing a wheely. Keep the knuckle down near the water by moving foreward as long as possible. Obviously you will want to get aft under chute once powered up. You will know when that is...

Watch your trapeze hook on the inside skins when climbing back in. They ding easily.

Buy knee pads until you learn to stay off your knees...

Helm traps always. In light air move crew forward and leeward so the helm can trap. My the girlfriend once fell assleep there during a light air day sail. That pretty much was the time I knew she would be my wife....

 

MR.CLEAN

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That pretty much was the time I knew she would be my wife....
Yeah, although I don't believe in marriage, it was an offshore fishing trip that really decided the commitment thing for me. South Beach, 30 knots, fishing for sails with live bait on kites. Steep 8 foot waves so she went and passed out on the floor of the cabin. I woke her up to bring in a sailfish, she said "let me sleep." We came in four hours later, she woke up at the dock, and said "can we go sailing now? It's way more fun than fishing"

Thanks for the tips. The inside of the boat does look pretty fragile.

 

skiffe

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Oops, almost forgot…

Once you’ve mastered some of the basics, there will be times when you’re out on the water and there just isn’t enough wind to get happy about. At these times you will want to start working on some “Stupid Skiff Tricks.” Here are a few examples:

Stupid Skiff Trick 1: Handstand Hiking – This is a real crowd pleaser and is guaranteed to convince any keelboaters in the area that you truly are “Da Shit”. While sailing in light to medium conditions, have your crew trapeze off the racks (or wings in your case) with his hands instead of his feet. He basically just does a handstand off the side of the boat while hanging from the trap, feet ‘a danglin’ in the wind. Bonus Points: If you, as the driver, can do this while steering the boat with the tiller extension in your teeth, you need not ever prove your manhood again.

Stupid Skiff Trick 2: Skiff Wheelie – When other boats see this, it look so weird that they will probably call the Coast Guard. While sailing in really light conditions, hook into the trap and have your crew go to the opposite side of the boat and hook into the trap. Balance the boat so each of you can fully extend off the racks. Now both of you start slowly moving aft until the bow of the boat comes out of the water. Done correctly you can actually get the boat to sail around with the nose at about 45 degrees. Don’t go too far aft or the boat will do a back flip. Bonus Points: have someone at the dock bring your cradle to the edge of the dock as you sail into the harbor doin’ the Skiff Wheelie. Drive the boat right into the cradle. A huge round of applause will erupt from the galley and rounds of drinks will be served on the house. Note, remember to pull the dagger board up, ouch!

Stupid Skiff Trick 3: Skiff Bodysurf – Cool and refreshing! While sailing in medium conditions hand the tiller extension to your crew (that will be his first clue that you’re about to engage in some skiff frivolity and he’ll just roll his eye’s at you like he always does). Unhook from the trap and slide into the water using only your hands to hold on to one of the foot straps or some other convenient hunk of hardware. Weeeeeeeee. If you can get back into the boat while it’s moving, you’re in great shape, congrats. If not, just let go when your crew isn’t looking and see how long it takes him to realize you’re not there. Bonus Points: Grab the rudder and make the boat wipe out. See if you can guess which dismount option (see above) your crew will select. This also is a good trick to perform if, during the course of the day, you have accumulated a large quantity of doodoo butter in your wetsuit. Simply crack your wetsuit collar open a little and watch the little chucks of fear power wash out your pant legs. Adjust your dietary fiber as required.

The lists goes on and on as there are almost an infinite variety of Stupid Skiff Tricks that you can use to improve your sailing skills and generally impress the world at large. But do remember that no matter what trick you are about to attempt, always say, “Hey, watch this!” first to guarantee a dramatic outcome and possible TV coverage.

I'm starting to think I want one...

And that’s just the beginning! We even have a secret handshake and a little hazing ritual called “Jungle Fire” I know you will enjoy.
"Jungle fire" that sounds good, we have a "Virgin converstion" and nude belly sliding rituals and as for the secert handshake, well I'll have a Heineken thanks.

But welcome to the skiff world have fun and tell your mates

 
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MR.CLEAN

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SEMTEX49 said:
Another basic tip is on bearing away. Try and get some windward heel on the boat, usaually helm stays out on the wire as crew moves in. This aids the boat completely and allows you to "stab" the boat down wind with the rudder. In any sort of wind you need a quick bear away and do not do it gradually. The reason for this is as the boat bears away the rig can accelarate with too much power and the hull can't keep up with the acceleration, making the nose dig in and basically you go "tit over arse" (pitch pole). By stabbing the boat down wind, you minimise the time for the rig to power up, minimising your risk of going down the mine.
I haven't seen this advice before, but it reminds me of the 50 degree "stabs" you sometimes need to do on beach cats to keep the leeward hull from submarining with the same end result. Is it that much of a stab on an I-14?

One more quick question: Doesn anyone know the difference in rig height/SA between the OD-14 with Grand Prix rig to a Cross III with the typical race rig at the time?

 

Pete M

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anyone know the difference in rig height/SA between the OD-14 with Grand Prix rig to a Cross III with the typical race rig at the time?
no difference, they were identical at the time

 




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