Solvents?

Greever

Super Anarchist
4,091
106
Rockford, MI
OK, this is a hot subject for me, as it raises my blood pressure a tad.

I have my boat stored on a custom trailer in my backyard. It only gets about 2-3 hours of direct sun a day and also has two trees that form a bit of a canopy over her.

I normally keep her pretty clean, but last Summer I left a bottle of Starbrite teak oil in the cockpit.

It exploded, unnoticed for a month or two. :angry: It had a chance to evaporate to a thin goo, staining an area about 1'x3' on the starboard seat. Also a little on the floor in the corner.

I scraped as much off as I could at the time, but don't know what I should use to get rid of it without damaging my gelcoat?

Any suggestions will be appreciated! (and by the way: fell free to call me a dumbass for leaving it up there in the first place!)

 

Whinging Pom

Super Anarchist
A solution of oxalic acid should get it off. This stuff is also known as muratic acid. You'll need gloves, goggles etc as it's quite nasty. If you're using it on a vertical surface, mix it up with wallpaper paste to make it stick. Wash off after couple of minutes with lost of fresh water. If it hasn't done the job then try again. Get it from a chemical suppliers or a swimming pool supplies place.

Also for sale in the swindlery as Y-10.

 

Greever

Super Anarchist
4,091
106
Rockford, MI
A solution of oxalic acid should get it off. This stuff is also known as muratic acid. You'll need gloves, goggles etc as it's quite nasty. If you're using it on a vertical surface, mix it up with wallpaper paste to make it stick. Wash off after couple of minutes with lost of fresh water. If it hasn't done the job then try again. Get it from a chemical suppliers or a swimming pool supplies place.
Also for sale in the swindlery as Y-10.

Damn good info.

Thank You Sir!

 

El Mariachi

Super Anarchist
41,182
1
About oven cleaner----BE VERY CAREFUL!! That shit could possibly be the most powerful over-the-counter stuff in the world!

(Somewhere in the States there is my old 90 Bronco driving around. Missing not only the clear coat around the drivers side door hinges and rocker panels, but the next two coats of paint).

 

Greever

Super Anarchist
4,091
106
Rockford, MI
J_T said:
Muriatic Acid IS NOT Oxalic Acid.Muriatic Acid is Hydrochloric Acid.

Do not use Hydrochloric Acid in a confined space or you will be overcome by the fumes and die.

Before you go the acid route you might try Simple Green, Mr. Clean, Ammonia, or Roll Off.

If these items are unsuccessful (are we talking gelcoat or paint?) you might try oven cleaner. Oven cleaner will yellow the gelcoat but the yellowing should come out with some bleach.
I've tried soap and water, simple green, softscrub with bleach.

It's up in the cockpit, so fumes won't be a problem.

PS: it's white gelcoat.

Thanks for the info, I feel like I'll get it one way or the other now!

 

Foghorn77

Super Anarchist
1,133
21
I've tried soap and water, simple green, softscrub with bleach.
It's up in the cockpit, so fumes won't be a problem.

PS: it's white gelcoat.

Thanks for the info, I feel like I'll get it one way or the other now!

Try toilet bowl cleaner (liquid) with a good fresh water rinse after.It works on my gel-coat with no side effects.

 

jfr

Member
328
0
46042
I'm a bit of a chemist (biochem, actually), and one of the rules of solubility is "like dissolves like" so ideally you'd want to dissolve it in ANOTHER oily liquid. But that still leaves you with oily residue. Therefore, the next best thing would be a detergent, in which the molecules themselves are half-oily-half-waterey; the oily half sticks to the teak oil, and the waterey half washes it all away when rinsing.

If a detergent like simple green won't cut it, what you may need to try is some automotive hand cleaner (don't get the kind with the pumice, as your gelcoat may not want to be scratched) which is applied initially WITHOUT WATER (read the directions); when concentrated, it dissolves oil and grease, and, after brushing/soaking for a while, is rinsed off with water afterward. If it can remove that nasty black glop from a mechanic's hands, it should be able to dissolve some teak oil just fine. Test it on a small area first, for the sake of the gelcoat.

I'd stay away from acids, bases, and bleaches unless nothing else works - they don't fit into the "like dissolves like" scheme very well, as they are all water-based. And as for oven cleaner - take Mr. Booth's advice on that one...

 

SemiSalt

Super Anarchist
7,789
287
WLIS
I would add to jfr (who clearly knows more than I but whose comments reflect all I learned in chem class), try to find a way to give the detergent a considerable time to work. Sometimes, it takes time. The point of Scrubbing Bubbles (I think) is to keep the material on the wall long enough to have something happen.

You could try one of the citrus-based goo removers.

 

sailflat

Super Anarchist
1,084
2
Like JFR said...

Go to your local napa and get a can of foaming spray on engine cleaner/degreaser.

 




Top