Sprucing up a 40-year-old Nordic

Arcot

New member
13
1
Lund BC
Using @SloopJonB and @IStream 's advice, I've refinished the forward teak (head and cabin) with MinWax wipe-on poly coats followed by MinWax rubbed effect coats

old forward head

View attachment 482239

new forward head

View attachment 482241

fwd head door

View attachment 482242

Thanks for the good finishing advice you guys!

Now it's too cold here to refinish, probably until March, so currently I am replacing the original naugahyde ceiling panels with vinyl, which will really brighten things up.

new and old panels

View attachment 482243

In January, she's due for a haul-out to install a PSS shaft seal to replace the leaking original. And also the cockpit thru-hulls, which are seeping a bit of water through their wooden spacer blocks. Then hopefully I can attain at least a nearly-dry bilge, and clean and paint that area up, along with organizing some wiring and removing tramp wires.

Question for now:  How to clean these teak cockpit grates?  Along with an oxalic acid cleaning, they have a good bit of very old varnish in all the nooks and crannies that must be removed. I'm thinking it's an endless, thankless job just applying heat and scraping. Any better ideas??

View attachment 482245

Thanks,

IH 
Commercial wood furniture refi ishing chemical dipping tank.....

 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
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The space between the panel and the underside of the deck is already an insulating layer, but as pointed out above it will also allow condensation which will be a mess.

Keeping air away from that surface will be a good goal. I used small cell bubble-wrap held in place with blue painters tape around the edges, you could tape it or just staple it to the furring strips. I used what I had a lot of laying around. No condensation, so far. That paper-backed fiber insulation should work too.

- DSK

 

Israel Hands

Super Anarchist
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The space between the panel and the underside of the deck is already an insulating layer, but as pointed out above it will also allow condensation which will be a mess.

Keeping air away from that surface will be a good goal. I used small cell bubble-wrap held in place with blue painters tape around the edges, you could tape it or just staple it to the furring strips. I used what I had a lot of laying around. No condensation, so far. That paper-backed fiber insulation should work too.

- DSK
So basically you're saying that filling that air void is the most important thing?

 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
44,119
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Eastern NC
So basically you're saying that filling that air void is the most important thing?
Yes, air has a high R-value but it circulates. The air gap itself has insulating property, but it wall also allow dripping onto the back of your nicely renewed panels. We had this problem over the dinette which just had some foam-backs vinyl over it. The layer of bubble wrap holds much smaller pockets of air and prevents it from circulating... much nicer now. I would consider using the blue/pink foam panels too if I had some that fit, thickness wise, between the wood strips.

- DSK

 

Grande Mastere Dreade

Snag's spellchecker
This weekend's project is re-covering the 2 big ceiling panels in the V-berth. Due to their size, it's good payback for the effort. You can see what 40 years of boating does to Naugahyde.  :) But there are at least 400 staples to be removed in each panel. Then it's easy to peel/scrape the original glued-on foam layer off, wipe the plywood down with cleaner solution to remove the last of the musty odor, and let dry overnight. Then staple on foam-backed brighter vinyl.

View attachment 482445

View attachment 482446
seriously, go find a car upholstery shop,  pay them to do what you want, it'll be worth the money..

 

Slim

Super Anarchist
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Iz, I think the idea of going without cockpit grates is a good one. It may be possible to convert them into tables or something else.

On the interior colors, be careful of stark white, what is sometimes called Landlord White. I would tend toward warm colors.

Very interesting thread.

B.C.
Fein Multimaster with the 'fingertip' sanding pads. But reusing the teak is also good. 

 

Israel Hands

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On the interior colors, be careful of stark white, what is sometimes called Landlord White. I would tend toward warm colors
In total agreement Bull. The current white salon cushions give the interior an old Howard Johnson's feel. The Admiral and I are poring over upholstery samples and photographs before deciding on the materials.

Regarding the cockpit grates, I'm thinking to have them for "parade dress."  Boat doesn't have a lot of exterior teak, but I've already refinished the hatch boards with 8 coats of Epifanes and they look really nice. Planning to refinish the little bit of teak cockpit trim and the deck handrails, and add a new teak cockpit table (just finished 8 coats on it). With a new flag and the cockpit grates in, she should be looking good for July 4th. Then the grates can be stored for special occasions and for the sad day I part with her.

 

guerdon

Anarchist
Israel, nice boat. Check out Toto Fabrics in New Toto Indiana, they are online and sell small lots at drastic discounts.  Nice people to deal with and will send actual samples for free so you get it right [the admiral will enjoy getting swatches to compare and she will be proud of you saving money.]

 

Israel Hands

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seriously, go find a car upholstery shop,  pay them to do what you want, it'll be worth the money..
Yes, this was an option. But hey, now I have a nice Sailrite upholstery gun!  Damn, it makes this job halfway easy to do with stainless staples. And I have new upholstery skills to apply around the house.

While I'd classify myself as one of those who would definitely rather be sailing than tinkering, I am finding satisfaction in being able to do a lot of this stuff with reasonable results. And the ceiling panels are like the sewing stuff - big on savings. I wouldn't have bought this boat if I couldn't do a lot of this work myself.

 
@Israel HandsThat is a pretty boat - nice lines.  I'm enjoying the thread and looking forward to your tale as you spruce her up and give her the makeover she deserves.    

On the sanding of odd little bits of teak - I've found that a Dremel tool has a number of small sanding attachments that might help, though you'll want to buy the sanding drum replacement sandpaper in bulk, and it will be tough to get into the corners  no matter what.     

 

Israel Hands

Super Anarchist
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Israel, nice boat. Check out Toto Fabrics in New Toto Indiana, they are online and sell small lots at drastic discounts.  Nice people to deal with and will send actual samples for free so you get it right [the admiral will enjoy getting swatches to compare and she will be proud of you saving money.]
Will check this out, thanks.

 

IStream

Super Anarchist
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Question for now:  How to clean these teak cockpit grates?  Along with an oxalic acid cleaning, they have a good bit of very old varnish in all the nooks and crannies that must be removed. I'm thinking it's an endless, thankless job just applying heat and scraping. Any better ideas??

View attachment 482245
I know this may sound heretical, but I'd sand all the easy-to-get-to stuff on the faces and outer edges and leave the nooks and crannies as they are. Get yourself a set of stainless bottle brushes like these:

https://www.amazon.com/Cleaning-Stainless-Bristles-Variety-Bottles/dp/B07HLM9SQQ/ref=sr_1_10?keywords=wire+bottle+brushes&qid=1641575122&sr=8-10

and run them quickly through each orifice to dislodge any loose or flaking varnish. Then just put them back on the boat and use them, letting Mother Nature do her thing.

Next year, run the brush through again for any varnish that's flaked in the meantime. Rinse and repeat as necessary.

I predict that within a year or two, there'll be so little varnish left that you won't feel the need to sand it or at least be able to sand it with far less effort. 

 

Bull City

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The current white salon cushions give the interior an old Howard Johnson's feel. The Admiral and I are poring over upholstery samples and photographs before deciding on the materials.
I had all new cushions made for my H-Boat by a canvas shop in Oriental. I was leaning toward a sage green fabric, but the canvas lady steered me toward blue, I guess because the topsides are blue. I'm happy with the blue, but if I had it to do again, I would have stuck with the green.

We discussed cording on cushions, and she said don't. Cording looks nice but wears quickly. I took her advice.

She also had good advice on the settee cushions. They could have been one long cushion, but she  recommended a break to make it easier to get to the storage underneath, and since the break would not be near your hip while lying down, which is uncomfortable.

On the interior colors, be careful of stark white, what is sometimes called Landlord White. I would tend toward warm colors.
This I know because I painted the interior of my boat something close to Landlord White. I'm planning to repaint it soon. Cream overhead; haven't decided on the "ceiling" yet. Maybe a warm gray.

 
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Israel Hands

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Get yourself a set of stainless bottle brushes
Thanks I'll check those out. And while I've got 80-grit on the orbital, going to first off give the outside faces a buzz. I also picked up one of those 3-sided knives because my wife volunteered to take a crack at the squares (she has infinitely more patience than I do). We will see what that and maybe the Dremel can easily knock off.

The Fein Multimaster that @Slim mentioned looks really handy for future refinishing and mod work. May have to wait on that - I just received the WorkerB upgrade for my sewing machine that @IStream so heartily endorsed. That and a proper sewing table used up last month's tool budget but should be what's needed to up my game and produce the cushion covers etc. 

 

Soho

Member
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Bermuda..
+1 on the The Fein Multimaster,  I splurged and got one years ago,  someone building a Mini Transat boat at the time told they could build a whole f'ing boat with a Fein,  so I got it. Been very useful since then and it's got all sorts of uses if you do any home DIY as well as being good on the boat.  Nothing like having the right tool for the job. 

 

Israel Hands

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coastal NC
Vee-berth panels completed and reinstalled.

image.png

 

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