Starlink Anarchy

Grrr...

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10,255
2,666
Detroit
It seems like using a Peplink cellular router and a relatively light data plan with Peplink WAN as its backbone would be ideal - the cell network would fill in any temporary disconnections in service if available, and you could shut down Starlink during months where you were off the boat, relying on cellular data to keep some basic connectivity going if you wanted.

I wonder if Starlink is going to get better or worse - a race between launching satellites vs adding new subscribers
This is what many do. Another option is to use speedify and a tethered cellphone. It will bond the 4g/5g with starlink for seamless failover
 

socalrider

Super Anarchist
1,421
780
San Diego CA
This is what many do. Another option is to use speedify and a tethered cellphone. It will bond the 4g/5g with starlink for seamless failover
Very cool - thanks, had not been aware of the option. I suppose if you're in a spot where you need a cell phone antenna & modem you'll probably be getting good un-crowded Starlink service. Only issue is I don't see that you can use this to bond cellular and Starlink to create a more reliable WiFi network; it only works on a single device, correct?
 

Grrr...

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10,255
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Detroit
Very cool - thanks, had not been aware of the option. I suppose if you're in a spot where you need a cell phone antenna & modem you'll probably be getting good un-crowded Starlink service. Only issue is I don't see that you can use this to bond cellular and Starlink to create a more reliable WiFi network; it only works on a single device, correct?
It's my understanding a pep router can do the bonding, but I've never owned one.

If you set up the device you're doing the bonding on to share its internet, it should be able to share to an indefinite number of other machines. That would require additional ethernet or wifi dongles on the computer. But in that case the pep routers would be a better option if you really need to do it (and if they do the bonding the same way).

I get decent 4G where I am, but the starlink is variable enough that I sometimes can do web business calls. That's when the bonded connection really helps.
 

mckenzie.keith

Aspiring Anarchist
851
285
Santa Cruz
By the way we are trying starlink at our house now. So far it is OK but somehow I didn't realize that the download speed and upload speed are way different. Upload is much, much slower than download.
 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,341
1,043
The Gorge

mckenzie.keith

Aspiring Anarchist
851
285
Santa Cruz
That is the case for all internet service providers.

BTW: The FCC finally granted Starlink the license for mobile use. Not sure how that will translate into individual end user licenses.
Well maybe all major ISPs. My current ISP has symmetric bandwidth. But it is just one guy with an FCC licensed microwave backhaul connection. Many years ago I had symmetric DSL. And more recently I had a T1 line. So all my connections have been symmetric up until trying Starlink. T1 is 1.5 Mbps up and down come hell or high water. Reliable but not fast. And for us it was VERY expensive.
 

Excession

Long term lurker,doesn't say much.
231
43
Australia
unfortunately looks like they are going for the money first.
5K per month
10K up front.
 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,341
1,043
The Gorge
Yeah, the "marine" package is a non-starter for someone like me. I'd guess that the antennae are gargantuan as well.
Even the RV package is a bit of a stretch on retirement income. Looks like multiple solutions are still required if one needs or aspires to "blue water" data.
 

Virgulino Ferreira

Super Anarchist
1,363
1,315
Brazil
FYI, Starlink maritime coverage


1660242796412.png


1660242830061.png
 

lom

Member
52
27
San Juan Is
We are in the PNW and recently have come across a number of cruising boats with Starlink RV onboard, some of these folks work full time from their yacht and said its been pretty straight forward even moving around. 4 boats are making or just have made the big left with Starlink heading for Mexico and beyond. It'll be interesting to see how it goes, at least one of these boats plan to keep a full time remote job through the Mexico part of their cruise further afield.
 

Israel Hands

Super Anarchist
3,175
1,867
coastal NC
I have a friend who lives in Mexico who said that Starlink just dropped its pricing by half there, from $800 upfront to $400, and from $100 per month to $50. Has there been a big price drop? Or has my buddy been drinking mescal again?
 

MR.CLEAN

Moderator
46,682
4,726
Not here
infrastructure bill funding is helping fiber to reach far and wide at 50-70$/month (and they pay for 150 feet of underground cable, here). starlink ain't competitive at 120$ and $599. They just cut those prices in half in the US too.

True story: We signed up for Starlink when we moved to rural vermont last june. We were on slow-as-shit DSL - the only option here - until It arrived in August. Once I got it on the top of the highest gable, it worked great. Sure, it's pricey but 200MB/50MB is almost civilized compared to the nearly unlivable 22/0.5 we were on before. No brainer.

The day after I nearly killed myself on our steep roof, Fidium Fiber was installed at my neighbor's house a mile away. Sure enough, they ran it to the pole on my dirt road. WE called, they came, they installed. We needed an extra 180 feet at 60 cents per foot. 500 MB/200 MB now for 60$ per month for two years.

I got the Starlink down and boxed and returned a few days before the return period ended. I think they charged 100$ return fee.

Lot of running around, but happy with the outcome. Would have been happy with the starlink too.
 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,341
1,043
The Gorge
I just got billed for the same old (high) price. I think the price reductions were in places other than the US.
unlivable 22/0.5
Good grief! Before Starlink, (and moving on board) I had a microwave relay that was about 5/0.5. One could watch movies with it and (eventually) transmit large files. The local DSL was so oversubscribed that on days that it worked at all, it was around 15kbs. Like 1990's dial-up. Centurylink referred to this as "broadband," and charged accordingly.

Currently in a mast-dense part of a marina and the signal is significantly degraded, but still acceptable most of the time. (Can't always stream Dolby Vision 4K without dropouts)
 

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