Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
12,928
2,592
SNIP...

I have however seen time and again how industrial designers can transform an engineer's ugly duckling into a swan.
this reminds me of the ridiculous letter we got once, on a ferry design project, where the drawings had to go to public comment. Some high and mighty self-important "industrial designer" said we had it all wrong but that he would be very happy to steer us in the right direction. Thanks, but no thanks.

 
You guys make me laugh, you are such hard core anarchists you don't bother reading the posts properly before you react.

Tink

Yet again I will wish Dave and his team the very best

 

TalonF4U

Anarchist
713
29
Nevada
This whole thing has been fun to watch.

I am not sure what Tink's deal is, but I smell a troll. But, hey, this is Anarchy, and such is life, so keep hating if it makes you happy!

Re: the weather helm issue and Dave's thought about keeping a little load on the rudder--I agree completely that it's easier to keep control of a boat with a little weather helm when it's at speed. My Canoe rudder is the same as his--in its intial configuration it was pretty balanced and the boat was just way too hard to sail. I had to put a little load on it to make it work right. FYSA, the Blue Angels fly with a spring on the stick for the same reason--precice control is easier when it has a little bit of load. I remember explaining this to an instructor in flight school when he was critsizing the way I'd trimmed the plane in the pattern. I wanted just a touch of feel for more precise corrections. Lost the argument, but got past the school phase and still do the same thing in the plane...

I'm really interested in where this goes. I consider myself a decent sailor (or perhaps just less humble than Dave?...he beat me at worlds...) and my one crack at a moth was awesome but did remind me that it's pretty hard to start sailing one. Guys with only Laser backgrounds are going to have to be fit, skilled, and endure lots of crashing to make that boat--or its slightly chubby brother, the Wazsp--go. I expect the UFO is going to make that transition much less painful and therefore much more available.

I'm also wildly curious to line it up on a Portsmouth line and just let it run. Out in Richmond (CA) we had the most fun racing those big pursuit races... the Moths would do well with consistent breeze if they were upright. The I-14s were generally winners if they could fly three sails most of the time. The Canoes won the races with lots of beats and reaches, and honestly the Thistles were competitive in the drifters. I'm frankly shocked Dave et al has survived so long on SA without answering the fundamental question--"What's it rate????"

 
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wpbeardsley

Member
375
5
I'm pretty interested in getting one and have been communicating with Dave. I think it's more likely than not that I pull the trigger - just waiting to see another video and maybe go for a demo sail later this fall if time allows and then I'm in. Checks a lot of boxes.

 
Laughing at the Tink haters again tonight.

Having reread my first post again I think, in hind sight, my wording could have be very different and a apologise to Dave and his team unreservedly for the tone of the first post.

I have been members of a number of boat design forums over a number of years, have posted ideas and people comment. The comments can be positive and negative and I have found this very useful. Clearly, despite the acidity of the Anarchy website, this is not that type of forum. I know that Dave did not start this post and probably feels a bit hijacked. With the design so complete I am sure he does not want and discussion about the design.

I am not a Troll, just a guy very passionate about innovate small boat design and curious about the design. I have many questions I would like to ask but appreciate Dave is very busy and so I will not waste his time.

I do have some issues with the design but these are minor compared with my admiration of what he has achieved.

Anyway yet again I wish Dave and his team all the best.

Tink

 

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
12,928
2,592
Well I guess for some reason nobody really saw to it to give Tink the correct greeting. So Fuck Off Newbie :-D

 

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
12,928
2,592
The whole hydrofoil thing has been a strange trip. In the 60s it looked like it could happen. Dave Keiper sailed all over the Pacific. And then nothing happened--until the Hobie trifoiler. Again, great excitement, followed by disappointment. Parallel to this, there was the hydrofoil on the original windsurfer, which for some reason never caught on. Finally, the moth happened. That started something. Not sure why other than that it was a racing hothouse and there is nothing like racing, to make something actually have to work.

So fast forward to today. Dave's idea and his boat are the only actual practical boat with hydrofoils. All the others are either yachts, or are impractical. This is a big deal.

 
The whole hydrofoil thing has been a strange trip. In the 60s it looked like it could happen. Dave Keiper sailed all over the Pacific. And then nothing happened--until the Hobie trifoiler. Again, great excitement, followed by disappointment. Parallel to this, there was the hydrofoil on the original windsurfer, which for some reason never caught on. Finally, the moth happened. That started something. Not sure why other than that it was a racing hothouse and there is nothing like racing, to make something actually have to work.

So fast forward to today. Dave's idea and his boat are the only actual practical boat with hydrofoils. All the others are either yachts, or are impractical. This is a big deal.
Please don't forget the efforts of us Brits

Philip Hansfords Mayfly, 23 knotts in 1977

James Grogono Icarus 28.1 knotts in 1985

Both over 500 meters, not an instant GPS reading

Philips second Mayfly used the Hook surface sensor which was then used by the Moth, the AYRS instrumental in developing thesurface sensor for sailboats at this time in the UK but others elsewhere may have been doing the same.

But you are correct Dave's idea is the closest to practical foiler for all and yes that is a big deal.

Tink

 

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
12,928
2,592
I rather deliberately left the British boats out, as much as I love them--you MUSt watch everything the good doctor said about his efforts--they are on youtube now!

Icarus and Mayfly, as well as a whole bunch of other boats, never got to a point where they proved truly practical. Keiper did--sailing across the Pacific. The Hobie was practical enough to actually become a product. The AYRS hydrofoil book is a gold mine of dead ends, false starts, and certainly plenty of grist for the mill of future good ideas though.

 

Doug Lord

Super Anarchist
11,483
21
Cocoa Beach, FL
The whole hydrofoil thing has been a strange trip. In the 60s it looked like it could happen. Dave Keiper sailed all over the Pacific. And then nothing happened--until the Hobie trifoiler. Again, great excitement, followed by disappointment. Parallel to this, there was the hydrofoil on the original windsurfer, which for some reason never caught on. Finally, the moth happened. That started something. Not sure why other than that it was a racing hothouse and there is nothing like racing, to make something actually have to work.

So fast forward to today. Dave's idea and his boat are the only actual practical boat with hydrofoils. All the others are either yachts, or are impractical. This is a big deal.
Please don't forget the efforts of us Brits

Philip Hansfords Mayfly, 23 knotts in 1977

James Grogono Icarus 28.1 knotts in 1985

Both over 500 meters, not an instant GPS reading

Philips second Mayfly used the Hook surface sensor which was then used by the Moth, the AYRS instrumental in developing thesurface sensor for sailboats at this time in the UK but others elsewhere may have been doing the same.

But you are correct Dave's idea is the closest to practical foiler for all and yes that is a big deal.

Tink
I believe John Ilett copied(and improved) the system Dr. Sam Bradfield had used on the original Rave. I talked to John about it before the first Ilett Moth flew with a wand system.

 
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Wess

Super Anarchist
Dave -

If you can, ignore the hanger-ons and the haters, and if possible share how many boats will come out of the first run, when they will be available, and what regions of the country they are going to? Help us understand where fleets may form first...

Wess

 

Dave Clark

Anarchist
882
747
Rhode Island
Dave -

If you can, ignore the hanger-ons and the haters, and if possible share how many boats will come out of the first run, when they will be available, and what regions of the country they are going to? Help us understand where fleets may form first...

Wess
Texas! The amount of buy-in and enthusiasm coming out of the lone-star state is causing me to seriously consider issuing Texas sail numbers. Other nuclei are RI, Connecticut, Florida, california and maybe Annapolis. Non-US countries with buys or serious intent to buy are, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and Switzerland. There's been a good amount of inquiry from England as well, but no trigger pulling (who would after what just happened to the pound?).

Batches contain 9 boats apiece because that's the number of boats you safely get from a barrel of vinylester resin. We're running the batches end to end with no plan on stopping unless demand lets up. We're building at least 20 this winter. The aim is to sell 100 in the first year, expanding exponentially from there. Get on board, people! This ain't vaporware. This is real life.

DRC

 
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