Stilleto 27

david r

Anarchist
586
53
pond
wow, 6 years later.

when i was a youth Bill Higgins, the designer of the 27 used to stop by our house and get my dad's input on his model and design work.  Bill was the Hobie Cat rep and we had a hobie cat dealership, so that's how we knew him.  i remember  he was getting expired pre-preg and nomex from the airplane companies.  It was still good enough for boats even though the aircraft couldn't use it.  This was in the early 70's.

 

nota

Anarchist
the cat I have not seen yet

is a 40x20 boat with very simple hull berths

but a hard deck so a 20x20 in port at anchor cabin

could be created/erected when  not in motion

so both a sailor and a condo just not at the same time

 
A friend had one of these. 30 years ago, we did some races on it, and some related cruising - 'round Catalina, Ditch Run, and around the SF Bay. It's a fun and fast boat - we sailed from Isthmus to MDR in 2 hours. But I thought it was flexy in waves, and it took like 4 hours to set up or break down for trailering. Yes you can sleep in it. But it's still a small boat, with little room or privacy. For longer cruises, a cockpit tent would be great for lounging room out of the sun, rain, or fog.

By the time you buy one of these, get good sails, running rigging and other stuff for it, you could probably get a nice Farrier tri - probably a better boat, and way easier to set up and break down. I'm not sure how they compare speedwise. Cruise-wise, a Stilletto 27 is less boat than an F24, let alone an F27/28.
 

Tomfl

Member
the cat I have not seen yet

is a 40x20 boat with very simple hull berths

but a hard deck so a 20x20 in port at anchor cabin

could be created/erected when not in motion

so both a sailor and a condo just not at the same time
Must be the new math you are using to get a 20X20 cabin on a boat with a 20 foot beam. While not quite up to your 40X20 I have a Seawind 1000 that has a bolt on hard top over what is basically a hard deck. There was also a sister ship Seawind 1000 that had what was basically a canvas cabin instead of a hardtop. Seawind now makes a few models larger than the ten meter 1000s, including a 13.6 meter one. While I would not claim the Seawinds are the best choice for open ocean passages (even thought they have circumnavigated) they are clearly not an overgrown beach cat; more what I would call a coastal cruiser. They also have generous head room in the hulls with very comfortable berths and what I consider a luxury level gallery; all at the cost of a performance hit.

While at anchor you might get by with some type of canvas cabin/tent that covered the whole deck you would still need some way to go forward if only to raise the anchor which means the canvas cabin or tent would not cover the whole bridge deck but have something like two foot of open deck to walk forward on. As a rule even simple hull berths have some type of raised superstructure to allow sitting headroom over the berths The nearest thing to what you are describing was the old Mcgregor 36. There are also Reynolds 33 which is more of a beach cat but smaller than the Mcgregor (and much faster).

36ft-catamaran-mcgregor-pic-4.jpg
 

Tomfl

Member
A friend had one of these. 30 years ago, we did some races on it, and some related cruising - 'round Catalina, Ditch Run, and around the SF Bay. It's a fun and fast boat - we sailed from Isthmus to MDR in 2 hours. But I thought it was flexy in waves, and it took like 4 hours to set up or break down for trailering. Yes you can sleep in it. But it's still a small boat, with little room or privacy. For longer cruises, a cockpit tent would be great for lounging room out of the sun, rain, or fog.

By the time you buy one of these, get good sails, running rigging and other stuff for it, you could probably get a nice Farrier tri - probably a better boat, and way easier to set up and break down. I'm not sure how they compare speedwise. Cruise-wise, a Stilletto 27 is less boat than an F24, let alone an F27/28.

I have a soft spot for both the Stilletto an fboats but to a large extent ii is a case of horses for courses. The Stiletto was designed on the West Coast of Florida many years ago and as others have noted it is well ahead of it's time. For what I will call bay sailing inside the barrier islands of the West Coast of Florida it is a great choice. There were many folks who set up a tent with the topping lift raised as high as it would go to provide a nice camping area or even pitched a modern tent on the forward tramp.

No question the fboats are much easier to take apart or put together and trailer but cost wise a decent C24 is about ten grand more than a Stilletto and you could probably get three Stillettos for the cost of a C28. I am sorta, kinda, maybe still in the market for some type of day sailer weekend camping cruising small sail boat and all of these boats are in consideration. For a good weather weekend the Stilletto with a tent would likely be more comfortable than the C24 and way cheaper than the C27/28. Even a C28 is not really a standing headroom boat for much of the interior space. For more than a weekend trip the fboats would be a much better choice.

While the fboats are faster than a lot of boats around them they are all what I call reasonable in sail area design and able to deal with more than light winds while the Stilletto is over canvased for anything but light air (which is the normal weather on Florida's West coast. So the Stilletto would be faster in say under ten knots while the f boats would be faster in say 15-20+ knots.

Like I said horses for courses.
 
@david r Hopefully the information is evergreen, like a lot of old SA threads'.

@Tomfl The Seawind looks great. Maine Cats are like this too - open deck with a hard top and canvas sides - all you need most of the time - a lot lighter and simpler.

Richard Woods' designs are great, but rare in the US. I like his two folding cats, 22' and 26'.

I always liked the Warrior 29, but I don't know if it breaks down for trailering.
 




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