Stripped vs spliced halyards

Passport111

Member
269
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New boat and need to update lots of running rigging.

Bringing over some extra halyards etc. from previous boat and/or buying new line.  Most of what I would try to transplant is too short and looking to save money on the new stuff. 

I'm wondering what thoughts are on stripping a dynema double braid vs splicing some sk-78 onto an existing double braid. 

Splicing is definitely more economical from a materials perspective.  I have all winter so don't mind the work but want to know what I don't know that would make me change my mind.

 
I used an old halyard that was too short for my dad's boat by stripping the core out the exact distance I needed to. So the tail now is just cover (not a problem because it's never loaded), the part that meets the stopper is cover + core, and the rest is just the Dyneema core.

 

Soho

Member
419
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Bermuda..
I used an old halyard that was too short for my dad's boat by stripping the core out the exact distance I needed to. So the tail now is just cover (not a problem because it's never loaded), the part that meets the stopper is cover + core, and the rest is just the Dyneema core.
+1,  have done exactly the same thing, works fine.  Only wrinkle  has been when you use the halyard to hoist someone up the rig,  you are sort of running a bit of tail through till you get to cored halyard,  it works though,  just have a safety line ( second halyard ) on them too...  

 

yoyo

Anarchist
758
315
Any chance your old covers are in good shape but just too short?  If so pull the old core and insert a dyneema core through the old cover.  Make part of it uncovered (tapered) thereby gaining length you need while saving weight and cost.  Something to consider.

 

Passport111

Member
269
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Thanks all, good to know.  My halyards are all going to be about 20-30' short.  Not sure I want to run a core-less cover that long. 

Seems like splicing dyneema to the old halyard or reusing the cover only is the way to go.  

@yoyo, how you go about running new dyneema through 100' of cover?

 

Haligonian Winterr

Super Anarchist
1,491
63
Halifax, NS
Thanks all, good to know.  My halyards are all going to be about 20-30' short.  Not sure I want to run a core-less cover that long. 

Seems like splicing dyneema to the old halyard or reusing the cover only is the way to go.  

@yoyo, how you go about running new dyneema through 100' of cover?
Tie a piece of messenger to the old core before you pull it. I've pulled hundreds of meters of core into new cover in an hour or two with this.

Splicing a new dyneema "tip" into a halyard is common. So long as you have the sheave space to fit the diameter of the splice (it will be no bigger than a normal eye splice), you shouldn't have any issues. Same for re-covering a Dyneema covered eye at the sheave exit, or splicing in a new ~3m section at the sheave exit when the tip is worn but the rest of the rope is fine.

HW

 

Passport111

Member
269
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Me too. 

I'm not sure how popular it is but I really like the Sampson MLX.  Spliced easily for one but nice hand and seems to hold up well in clutches and winches.  I have not tried the MLX3 yet but the original is to me very nice and I was able to get some great deals at APS (sadly no more).  I may be using what I have from that and supplementing with new MLX.  Better performing than poly core but still at a reasonable price.  

 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
62,196
5,442
De Nile
And you can also insert a piece of inexpensive line in the empty section of the old core.  A 12 strand poly would let you splice it to the new dyneema core if desired. You'd have one fat spot.

 

crashdog

Anarchist
542
182
We have a main halyard (doubled hoist -180 ft) that has 60 ft of exposed core.  We spliced a lighter core material to the tail of the original core before we pulled the core to expose it.  There is a fat bit in the middle where the original core is spliced to the lighter core but it is not that significant.  We also doubled the exposed core back to the reefed hoist point (approx 6  ft - really just a long buried tail on the eye splice). 

So there are a few calculations to make when setting up the halyard - full original core length from full hoist to clutch stopper + doubled core to the reef point, plus original core to light core splice.  and don't forget that you need enough length of original core so that your reefed hoist is still stoppered on the original core. 

If I remember it worked out to needing 75% of total halyard length as covered double braid, and about 33% of total halyard length of light core to get us to have all the required measurements to line up.  On a single hoist, the calculation is a little more straightforward. 

 

us7070

Super Anarchist
10,229
243
Ah yes of course...messenger when pulling the old core.  Thanks all!

BTW always like this outfit's videos.

https://youtu.be/aohGiTNCMQE


that's a neat solution

but how do you make it work with the clutch or jammer?

you want covered dyneema in the clutch - not bare dyneema.., and not the polyester cored line...

so that means the splice has to be at the clutch? right?

 

yoyo

Anarchist
758
315
Cover and dyneema core extend through clutch and past multiple wraps on winch.  Bare dyneema in front of clutch and whatever you want past the winch on the tail.  So any double braid poly to dyneema core splice will be in the tail downstream of any intended load.  So the core splice will be downstream of the winch but the cover must extend well forward of the clutch.  Takes some careful measuring but is doable. 

Its much easier to just pull new dyneema core full length and you would gain the extra length you need by leaving the dyneema uncovered up to the halyard shackle.

 
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Passport111

Member
269
12
Regarding lengths, I'm just keeping it simple and having it stripped to approximately the mast exit when hoisted.  This way it can still be jumped with a good grip and I don't have to worry about chafe at the mast base or any other deck organizers.  

 

yoyo

Anarchist
758
315
Regarding lengths, I'm just keeping it simple and having it stripped to approximately the mast exit when hoisted.  This way it can still be jumped with a good grip and I don't have to worry about chafe at the mast base or any other deck organizers.  
Yes - good point I forgot to mention. 

Also while you are at it consider adding chafe sleeves on the first 6-8 feet of the jib/spin halyards for added protection through the sheave/mast exits when hoisted.  Extend the chafe sleeve on the main halyard far enough for the main to be in the lowered reefed position.

I sky my uncovered halyards using pendants when not in use to keep the UV off the bare dyneema.  I also like to have the halyard cover long enough to still be inside the lower mast exit with the halyards skied for same reason.

 

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