SV Seeker

George Graves

Member
90
45
Chance of assymmetry too.
When the boat when into the water, it was listing at about 5 degrees. the builder has since then stuffed as much extra lead into fule tanks as he can - and there is an extra 1000 pounds up on deck to correct for fore-aft. After all of that - In a recent video, 3 men when to the rail, and peered over, and the boat listed again about 3-5 degrees. Someone tell me I'm wrong, but on a 74 foot boat, 3 men should not make a boat list 3-5 degrees. 30-35 foot boat maybe. 74? Seems very tender to me.
 

MikeJohns

Member
478
123
Hobart
When the boat when into the water, it was listing at about 5 degrees. the builder has since then stuffed as much extra lead into fule tanks as he can - and there is an extra 1000 pounds up on deck to correct for fore-aft. After all of that - In a recent video, 3 men when to the rail, and peered over, and the boat listed again about 3-5 degrees. Someone tell me I'm wrong, but on a 74 foot boat, 3 men should not make a boat list 3-5 degrees. 30-35 foot boat maybe. 74? Seems very tender to me.
As a useful indication of GM the roll period, (one side down over and back tot he start position) should be around the max beam in meters.

But the only certain test is to take the lines off the boat and do an inclining test. Some boats have a very low initial stability and although overly tender aren't dangerous as they have a high enough RM at say 15 degrees. Although if 3 people heel it more than say 1/8 of a degree it's never going to stand up to sail.
 

Jim in Halifax

Super Anarchist
1,566
637
Nova Scotia
As a useful indication of GM the roll period, (one side down over and back tot he start position) should be around the max beam in meters.

But the only certain test is to take the lines off the boat and do an inclining test. Some boats have a very low initial stability and although overly tender aren't dangerous as they have a high enough RM at say 15 degrees. Although if 3 people heel it more than say 1/8 of a degree it's never going to stand up to sail.
^^^
This.
 
Oh. That is not good. To be even able to notice the boat heel any amount when it is that size is.... wrong. It had a slow roll period (for it's size) before
Perhaps this might explain the huge fall off in progress toward getting some sail set and getting a feel for this....craft. Any and all of us sailors would be itching to get it out on the water and put it through it's paces.
 

socalrider

Super Anarchist
1,347
698
San Diego CA
Perhaps this might explain the huge fall off in progress toward getting some sail set and getting a feel for this....craft. Any and all of us sailors would be itching to get it out on the water and put it through it's paces.
I think you're giving them too much credit. It doesn't seem to me that this issue is even on their radar yet. Right now they seem to be (slowly, inefficiently) dealing with a very long list of poor design decisions with much less severe consequences.
 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,181
965
The Gorge
So Doug has now been on a sailboat. Is he the only one of the “crew” who has? Has he told them?

Somehow, I’m starting to think this more and more resembles the Crimson Permanent Assurance.
 

Santanasailor

Charter Member. Scow Mafia
1,344
701
North Louisiana
As a useful indication of GM the roll period, (one side down over and back tot he start position) should be around the max beam in meters.

But the only certain test is to take the lines off the boat and do an inclining test. Some boats have a very low initial stability and although overly tender aren't dangerous as they have a high enough RM at say 15 degrees. Although if 3 people heel it more than say 1/8 of a degree it's never going to stand up to sail.
In all seriousness, did they consider a ballasted keel. I know this makes sailing/motoring down the Arkansas/Mississippi River systems a bit more dicey, but

It is a sailboat. Has anyone involved in the design work have any experience in designing and sailing, Sailboats?

I understand that in the late 1800’s there was a serious discussion/debate regarding stability. The English preferred a very narrow hull with a very deep draft and heavy keel, offering little initial heeling resistance but as more heeling was induced, the hull became very stiff. The American’s preferred a very beamy hull with high internal ballast, and a centerboard for lateral resistance. This created a hull with very high initial resistance to heeling with the resistance decreasing as the heeling increases. However, in looking at the pictures, the hull in question is neither very beamy or very narrow with lots of draft. Its kind of rounded but with shallow bilge keels, it appears the reasoning was to make a shallow draft craft with no real regard to sailing or safety.

I have tried exploring these folks plans, the seem very proud of the method used, but no where have I seen anything that resembles hull lines, determination of center of lateral resistance vs center of effort, with no true hull lines drawing, building something that floats is not hard, building something that is safe to navigate on is a whole different ball game. Been there and at least my model floated level and reasonably close to its lines.

Being late to this party and this has been discussed, send me to the correct page, please.
 
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h20man

Anarchy Organiser
591
88
ocean
Origami

transform a flat square sheet of paper into a finished sculpture through folding and sculpting techniques. Modern origami practitioners generally discourage the use of cuts, glue, or markings on the paper.

Facebook description of Sailing Vessel Seeker…

”Sailing Vessel Seeker is our 74 foot “origami” steel hulled….

I’ve been involved with just about every kind/type of boat for more than 70 years. (Since I was a toddler and it was safe enough to put me on a scow). Never had I heard of a boat being an origami. Someone please educate this poor individual. How is a piece of paper that is folded, related to a steel hulled sailboat?
people…. it is a bit bunny mistake. they meant to spell “original” not “origami”…… right?
(no purple font for sarcasm)
 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,288
5,217
Canada
Has anyone involved in the design work have any experience in designing and sailing, Sailboats?
In a word - nope. Some guy sketched something on a piece of paper. Here are the "design drawings"
1656347882388.png

1656347916873.png

The drawing for the origami hull plate cuts was tested in scale models and altered several times till they got a hull shape they liked.

The two bilge keels do have lead in them. How much? Dunno.

To me, it's pretty narrow in beam. L/B = 4.9. Look at the top view. Not much form stability. If it was a proper sailboat I'd say "hey you need a pretty deep keel to keep it upright with that skinny a beam"
 

Autonomous

Turgid Member
4,103
1,332
PNW
IIRC the 'some guy' that drew the tender untenable tender drew Seekers lines.

Question. Was the tender built first? If so, why would you trust his work for your big boat?
 

Santanasailor

Charter Member. Scow Mafia
1,344
701
North Louisiana
In a word - nope. Some guy sketched something on a piece of paper. Here are the "design drawings"
View attachment 525545
View attachment 525546
The drawing for the origami hull plate cuts was tested in scale models and altered several times till they got a hull shape they liked.

The two bilge keels do have lead in them. How much? Dunno.

To me, it's pretty narrow in beam. L/B = 4.9. Look at the top view. Not much form stability. If it was a proper sailboat I'd say "hey you need a pretty deep keel to keep it upright with that skinny a beam"
That’s the drawings I looked at. You are right, narrow, no form stability, begging for a deep keel. Preferably with a lead bulb on the end. Instead, a couple little stubs. I built better sailboats when I was a ten year old.
 
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